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Let's speak about the quality in our products and more...

Discussion in 'Rumors and Speculation' started by Mr.Source, Oct 17, 2017.

  1. valiant67

    valiant67 Rich Corinthian Leather
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    If that is the case, the service manager probably needs to be trained for better people skills if his feelings are affecting his treatment of customers.
     
    somber, danbek, Doug D and 3 others like this.
  2. wtxiceman

    wtxiceman Well-Known Member

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    That's no joke, or fired.
     
  3. UN4GTBL

    Level 2 Supporter

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    Here's a little story for you all.

    Started my car this morning, and it just *barely* started. I knew that I should have just gone to get a new battery on my way to work and got a new battery, but I didn't. So, when I came out after work, the car was dead in the water. Thankfully, when my car was weird last year, I picked up a portable booster that I kept in my car, so I was able to boost the car at work, and then on my way home I picked up a new battery. Tried to swap it in the parking lot, but didn't have the socket in the car for the battery clip bolt. So, I jumped the car again with my booster, and went home. Was thinking to myself "this will only take a couple minutes"

    Little did I know it wouldn't...

    Turns out, the bolt on the battery clip in the Caliber doesn't have a nut and bolt. Instead, DUMBLER saved $0.0005 and put a piece of sheet metal on the bolt instead of a nut. Which, is in the worst location ever, being blocked by the radiator hoses from the bottom, and by the frame and radiator from the top. Nevermind that there are about half a dozen bolts with nuts holding the battery tray onto the frame. So, that meant that, like just about everything else with my Caliber, the front bumper and the driver's headlight had to come off, as the bolt was just spinning freely, while not coming out:

    [​IMG]

    So, eventually I was able to destroy enough of my battery tray to get the battery clip off and get the old, dead battery out

    [​IMG]

    Here's the carnage, you can see how the piece of sheet metal actually broke in two pieces allowing it to spin around freely when the bolt was turned with a socket. The battery clip is ok, but the other piece of black plastic is a piece of the battery tray that I ended up tearing out to get the battery out (gonna need a new battery tray now):

    [​IMG]

    And finally the new battery in the dang car:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    THANK YOU DUMBLER CHRYSLER FOR TAKING A 4 MINUTE JOB AND MAKING IT A 4 HOUR JOB!
     
    aldo90731, Ian, jorisr and 5 others like this.
  4. Beentherebefore

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    I had the same experience...............................already 25 years ago.
     
  5. Beentherebefore

    Level III Supporter

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    Back in the 60's and 70's when they had a real "performance" reputation and were competitively reliable, a used Mopar for sale was considered a desirable vehicle. I sold a '62 Plymouth ex-police car to a guy down the street that happen to see a "For Sale" sign on it. I sold my '68 Charger with a 440" within a few days of placing an ad in the local paper. It had over 400 runs at the dragstrips on it and visibly burned some oil. The buyer pressed the gas pedal to the floor entering the freeway, it snapped his neck back and he pulled out his wallet when his test run was over. I had a standing offer to buy my '72 Petty-blue Roadrunner with a 340" motor even though the car had 100,000+ miles on it and needed some work. By the time I put my '79 LeBaron up for sale, things had started to change. No offers and I had to trade it to the dealer to get rid of it. The few people that I know that recently tried to unload a used Mopar are having a much harder time. Can't sell them on reliability, economy, or longevity. Even selling on a "performance" reputation, they are up against Mustangs, Camaros, Bimmers, and hopped up "rice-rockets"......and the overall bad reputation of most Mopar dealers.
     
    Ian and JavelinAMX like this.
  6. hemirunner426

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    hey,we agree on something...merry Christmas.
     
  7. humdrum

    humdrum Well-Known Member

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    I read all of this and compare it to my current experience. My 2014 Cherokee just turned 43,000 mi, and had to service it once when the engine light came on. It was a gasket in a transmission module that caused the engine light to come on. Diagnosed and fixed in under one hour. They even gave me a loaner figuring it might take longer. So the ugly stories of having to be stranded out on the road have not come true.

    Now compare this to my wife's daily driver, a 2013 Ford Focus with the 2.0, dual clutch 6 speed transmission, which has now been in the shop a fifth time to have the clutches replaced, the Cherokee has been the reliable one in this family.

    As the car was in the shop, my friend who sold me the focus, as well as the Edge, Freestyle before that, beckoned me to test the new 2018 Focus. While it is interesting (3 cylinder, Ecoboost, with a different 6 speed than what our Focus had, and Stop/Start tech) I still have reservations about Ford's latest iteration of the Focus. They also use the same setup in the Fusion. Driving the new car I actually thought that the transmission was malfunctioning until I realized that what was causing the abruptness was the Stop/Start system. I suppose one has to get used to that. The 3-cylinder turbo performed as well as the 2.0 four with supposedly better mpg. Yet, a 3 cylinder? How reliable can that be?

    Personally, my wife likes the Mazda 3, but I've heard that the transmission is the same as in the dreaded dual clutch Focus. Will have to check that out. IDK. No new Dodge or Chrysler available.
     
    UN4GTBL likes this.
  8. mopar22

    mopar22 Well-Known Member

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    Mazda 3 is way better then the focus. Ford actually has a group of people looking for a lawsuit because of teh transmissions while mazda does not. SO mazda did something right there
     
    UN4GTBL likes this.
  9. jclick

    jclick Well-Known Member

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    I am a Dodge to Honda convert. Current Civic I bought new has 150K miles and the only thing I've had to replace is one taillight bulb, a couple lights in the center stack, and normal wear items. There has never been so much as a hiccup from the engine. Accord was flawless as well. I will still consider a Dodge when the time comes, but it will be tough to pass on the proven quality from Honda. Based on my experience with Mopar and Honda, there is a difference.
     
    Ian, Beentherebefore and JavelinAMX like this.
  10. valiant67

    valiant67 Rich Corinthian Leather
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    Ford didn’t do any better with the DDCT than FCA did. Fortunately FCA sold far few DDCT cars in the US than Ford and FCA quickly gave up on them, something proper testing would have prevented coming to market.
     
    JavelinAMX likes this.
  11. DBY2014

    DBY2014 Active Member

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    And those are the kinds of stories I have heard in my office for the last 24 years from my coworkers. We all use our personal cars for work and put on similar mileage. I always seem to be the one with cars in the shop. All of my Chrysler/Daimler/FCA vehicles over the years that I use for work couldn't make it to 100K miles without significant repairs. I currently have quite a few coworkers with over 200,000 miles on their Accords and Camrys. Their repairs are usually things that are supposed to break and wear over time. That has been one of my most frustrating things- trying to support my FCA employed family and friends while getting ridiculed about my cars always breaking down by my coworkers. Now that I own a Honda we will have to see how things go for me.
     
    #891 DBY2014, Dec 6, 2017
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2017
  12. somber

    somber 370,000 miles
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    For me, it is the opposite. I drove my Neon for 370K pretty much trouble-free miles (fuel pump once, cruise control went out once, motor mounts twice, shift bushings once). Meanwhile, several of my co-workers with Hondas (mostly Odysseys) experienced total transmission failures and other serious issues.
     
  13. mopar22

    mopar22 Well-Known Member

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    With the amount of miles you had the motor mounts are pretty much wear items since you have to remove them for the timing belt that's supposed to be replaced every 100k if i'm remembering correctly
     
    somber likes this.
  14. somber

    somber 370,000 miles
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    And probably I should consider the shifter bushings wear items as well.
     
    Cody's Car Conundrum likes this.
  15. mopar22

    mopar22 Well-Known Member

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    Most things on a car at that mileage would be a wear item. I had a 03 neon with a bent valve that would still drive just fine for it's last 6-8 months of it's life while getting better gas mileage then ever before, shows you just how well those cars were even if they didn't look the best inside and out
     
    somber likes this.
  16. tlc

    tlc Active Member

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    Had a 2001 Neon that had 201,000 miles when I got rid of it. A 2002 Dodge Caravan with 222,000 miles on it when I totaled it. Still have a 1996 Avenger with 204,000 miles on it. None had major repairs. Never replaced a starter, alternator, transmission, clutch, etc.
     
    somber and aldo90731 like this.
  17. hemirunner426

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    you got it right.
     
    djsamuel likes this.
  18. hemirunner426

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    thanks for sharing..we have all kinds of good stories like this.we need to share more of them.all the converted people yell and scream about how great there Japanese cars are.why don't we?
     
    tlc and somber like this.
  19. somber

    somber 370,000 miles
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    There is something like that right here on Allpar. Take a look at the 200,000 mile club postings. I love to read through those, because every one is posted by someone who loves their car.
     
    djsamuel likes this.
  20. JeepandRams

    JeepandRams Active Member

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    I have a customer with 320k miles on her Jeep Patriot. I have 2 Toyota service managers who have bought new Ram Hemis with one trading a 2000 mile Tundra.
     
    wtxiceman likes this.

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