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Looking ahead: product pipelines

Discussion in 'Mopar News' started by Dave Z, Dec 22, 2017.

  1. DAGAR

    DAGAR Active Member

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    not if the way you save weight is by compromising structure which at some point on a larger car you are going to do before the same weight for a smaller car. That's just physics....
     
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  2. David S

    David S Member

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    Obviously, that goes without saying. But now you said it anyway.
     
  3. David S

    David S Member

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    The 2005-2010 LX had poor ratings as well. The present one has poor small overlap ratings. A new FWD car could be made that was lighter and had good ratings including small overlap ratings. FWD saves weight compared with RWD.
     
  4. TripleT

    Level III Supporter

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    flex modulus per once its math, it can be overcome. Aluminum is the wrong direction. Big issue is the glass transition a high speed impact, that is why carriers like PP are better then Urethane or Epoxy.
     
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  5. David S

    David S Member

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    [QUOTE="Max Wedge, post: 1084910909, member: 90369"]What you have written down here does not dictate that the charger was heavier due to it being RWD. There's many variables. You should look at what chrysler was targeting at the time.[/QUOTE]

    Irrelevant to what I was answering. You can make the weight disappear so long as you switch to FWD and smaller engines. If you don't like the Intrepid comparison here are some current examples:

    Regal 3417 lbs
    Accord 3131 lbs
    Sonata 3,247
    Optima 3,219 lbs
     
  6. AlfaCuda

    AlfaCuda Active Member

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    After reading this thread I am now excited. Lots of exciting tech and products on the way. It’s all good news for FCA.
     
  7. DAGAR

    DAGAR Active Member

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    Like me I see you state the obvious... Unfortunately, that car along with it's investment would be unprofitable in the current climate. You can say I have to prove it, but of course there's no way to PROVE it either way, but recent experience has shown that FCA isn't going to pull off a front drive profitable vehicle made in their current capacity and don't say but Latin America... Have you checked the tariffs? Won't work. Recent measurable data on FCA's attempts shows this won't work. That's far more proof that it wont than your yeah, but 2 decades ago or because I say SUSW would be awesome here. I am part of the discussions on future product and FCA market direction. Are you?
     
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  8. DAGAR

    DAGAR Active Member

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    Irrelevant to what I was answering. You can make the weight disappear so long as you switch to FWD and smaller engines. If you don't like the Intrepid comparison here are some current examples:

    Regal 3417 lbs
    Accord 3131 lbs
    Sonata 3,247
    Optima 3,219 lbs[/QUOTE]

    and given those choices, people didn't choose the FCA offerings - never have really. Since the K-car days, it's been money on the hood and sell with the deal....
     
  9. David S

    David S Member

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    "Foreign-made vehicles imported into the U.S., whether new or used, either for personal use or for sale, are generally dutiable at the following rates: Auto 2.5%, Trucks 25%, Motorcycles either free or 2.4%. "

    Wow, 2.5%, that's only 1/4 of what the EU charges on US cars.

    www cbp gov/trade/basic-import-export/importing-car

    Recent experience, Sergio's halfhearted attempts with overweight cars, no direct injection like the 2010 Giulietta got, the 200 crippled in the market with a too short wheelbase so it didn't overlap with the 300, and the Dart just thrown together to meet the US government requirements for Fiat to purchase Chrysler. I want to see Chrysler and Dodge succeed, do you or Sergio?
     
  10. TripleT

    Level III Supporter

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    The slam SM for the failed US people moving Sedan Market is covered in other threads, no need to rerun it here. Everyone is divesting from its overcapacity. Only thing that more expensive sedan by FCA would have made was more loses and a quicker exit. Product pipeline is the thread title.... what can you add about that? If one wants to be in sedan market it needs to be either low cost sourced or stand out in the marketplace and not dependent on volume. Until the NA capacity restructuring at Ford, Honda, Toyota, and FCA is complete it best to stay out of it with anything produced in NA. Some of those companies have no new version of their sedan people movers planned Internationally... I want FCA to thrive and that mean staying out of the gutter, I fear even after the capacity adjust it will take even longer for those in NA to adjust to paying more for something the have grown accustom to negative margins on. What I would prefer is a RWD midsized in the Giulia vane with a slightly lower cost from a more affordable powertrain and less exotic materials. But that will be hard to cost justify until the market adjust to the capacity change and new price structure even with a stand out product.
     
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  11. BASONE88

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    Doubt there is anybody (posting) here that truly wants to see Chrysler and Dodge fail. So..

    As for the other innuendo in that sentence, based on his position and previous success(not to mention his actions - since 2009), it appears one can only conclude that Sergio's prime directive was, indeed, to make Chrysler and Dodge succeed.

    We can probably all agree that FIAT and Alfa Romeo could not do it on their own. Likewise, going forward, it sure looks like FIAT and Alfa will help the rest of the brands(here and worldwide)!
     
  12. DAGAR

    DAGAR Active Member

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    Yes, I want FCA To succeed which is exactly why I argue against the approach you are suggesting, but there's little point as you are more interested in blindly stating your opinion as fact versus working within the data that refutes so much of what you suggest. I can also tell you that Sergio is 100% vested in FCA success. At least when we talked this month... maybe you can share your opinions with him the next time oi speak. :cool:
     
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  13. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    I don't know the truth of it, but I do know the US has tended to have a rigorous free-trade ideology; people try to convince me that this blindly free trade (particularly with China, which does not have anything LIKE free trade) is all for the best because free trade is always best. Because it is. Because everyone knows it. (I never trust absolute ideologies; rarely is any social practice ideal when it is totally uncompromised.)

    Does make it hard to plan when you don't know what's going to happen with individual treaties, though.
     
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  14. redriderbob

    redriderbob Mopar Guru!
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    As companies like GM and Ford start trying to import more vehicles into North America from China, I see the Trump Administration becoming more involved on behalf of the UAW and CAW.
     
  15. Max Wedge

    Max Wedge Active Member

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    Irrelevant to what I was answering. You can make the weight disappear so long as you switch to FWD and smaller engines. If you don't like the Intrepid comparison here are some current examples:

    Regal 3417 lbs
    Accord 3131 lbs
    Sonata 3,247
    Optima 3,219 lbs[/QUOTE]
    So now you want to compare midsize cars to a full size charger?
     
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  16. David S

    David S Member

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    So now you want to compare midsize cars to a full size charger?[/QUOTE]

    No those are now full size cars for 2018:
    Regal 98 cu ft + 25 cu ft = 123 cu ft
    Accord 106 cu ft + 17 cu ft = 123 cu ft
    Sonata 106 cu ft + 16 cu ft = 122 cu ft
    Optima 105 cu ft + 16 cu ft = 121 cu ft
    Charger 105 cu ft + 16 cu ft = 121 cu ft
    300 106 cu ft + 16 cu ft + 122 cu ft
     
  17. Max Wedge

    Max Wedge Active Member

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    No those are now full size cars for 2018:
    Regal 98 cu ft + 25 cu ft = 123 cu ft
    Accord 106 cu ft + 17 cu ft = 123 cu ft
    Sonata 106 cu ft + 16 cu ft = 122 cu ft
    Optima 105 cu ft + 16 cu ft = 121 cu ft
    Charger 105 cu ft + 16 cu ft = 121 cu ft
    300 106 cu ft + 16 cu ft + 122 cu ft[/QUOTE]

    I wont argue from a volume perspective but just about every auto source is still classifying these as midsize which was why i was i had seemed surprised to see these particular cars on your list.
     
  18. freshforged

    freshforged Well-Known Member

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    I’ll believe that when I see it.
     
  19. Mopar392

    Mopar392 Well-Known Member

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    Does anybody know when we'll see a new Fiat 500?
    It was first released in 2007 and received a facelift in 2016. I wonder how long they are planning to keep it the same.
     
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  20. freshforged

    freshforged Well-Known Member

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    Don’t recall where I read it, but someone mentioned the new 500 being rolled out (in Europe) shortly. I suppose US spec vehicles will arrive 6 to 8 months after that. So...’nother year?
     

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