Hello, Allpar Forums member or visitor! If you were a member, you would not see this ad!

Register or log in at the top right of the page...

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

New 2013 Charger Hemi Pursuit - and advice to anyone thinking about buying one.

Discussion in 'Police, Taxis, Ambulances, etc' started by AHBGuru, Jun 13, 2015.

  1. AHBGuru

    AHBGuru Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2015
    Messages:
    210
    Likes:
    89
    Well, I finally accomplished something I've never had the opportunity to do in over 30 years of driving: I was given the opportunity to buy a brand new Chrysler police car.

    I've had a lot of Chrysler squads over the years, and the story that follows may be of interest to anyone looking at buying a used or, possibly, new Charger police car.

    I purchased my 2013 Hemi Pursuit new. The dealership had several to choose from, they had picked them up from the Chrysler auction for dealer stock. They had gone unsold, and upon my inquiry, they were able to determine that I could, indeed, purchase the car.

    The specifics: The car is Pitch Black, dogdish caps, the full Hemi Pursuit 29A Package, and also has an LED spotlamp, power L&R seats, power pedals, carpet with mats, and a full size spare.

    As far as performance, I will put it this way: It is unbelievable the extent of power, handling, and braking capability that this car has.

    The first things I did upon arriving home with it was to remove the spare tire relocation bracket. It mounts the tire at a 45 degree angle, basically taking up most of the trunk space. There was/is another option that stores the spare upright in the trunk well behind the optional slide-out electronics tray.
    I removed the bracket, and simply laid a rubber mat down at the front of the trunk floor and slid the tire up flat, just like the old Diplomat (though the Dippy had a trunk well that would accomidate the full size 15" spare). That leaves space on one side, and above, the tire, as well as a full trunk well and the area behind the tire. I will be procuring a civilian trunk floor cover that will allow me to store things in the well as well as use the flat floor space above.

    The car has the standard police mini-console, which includes 2-12v outlets and the Aux/USB port. My intention was to replace that with either the civilian console or perhaps a short police console to mount a CB and mobile scanner to use while spotting severe weather. That plan is on hold, because ...
    I went to the local police department to inquire about the necessity of a vehicle inspection (purchased out-of-state), which wasnt required, but also to establish goodwill between the police-car hobby and the department. The county in which I live, along with most surrounding counties and many municipalities and the State Patrol, all use the LD Charger as a primary Law Enforcement Vehicle.
    I was advised to try to leave the appearance of the car as-is, with no auxiliary lights, antennas, and certainly no markings of any kind.
    It turns out they were right, in ways I didn't imagine at the time - the car really draws attention. Mostly positive, but there's a few jokers out there who try to provoke reactions, and others who really hate cops. It's very important for people who buy these cars to remember that departments are using the cars in increasing numbers, more so now since the Charger is starting to capture Ford sales of departments fed up with the Taurus and Exploder.

    Driving this car requires a lot of patience and a lot of smiling and hand-waving. The idea is to give positive feedback, and relate to the public that it IS a cool car, and yes, it has very high performance, and for that reason, people should act appropriately around one.
    The other thing to keep in mind is that since I am not a law enforcement officer, I absolutely must not drive or use the appearance of the car in any way that could be construed as impersonating a police officer. This, of course, is an age-old problem in the police-car hobby, but it is the single most important factor for a person to keep in mind if they buy a new or used police car.

    It goes in to the local dealership next week for a full inspection to determine what, if any, work may be needed to rectify 2 years' of the car's sitting unsold. The Goodyear RSA tires had some nasty flat spots, 3 of which resolved by themselves, the fourth did not, so that became the spare. I suspect old fuel created some injection issues, as the car seems to misfire on occasion. We will see how that turns out, and I will update this thread from time to time with reliability/durability reports.
     
    pug-man likes this.
  2. Shane Estabrooks

    Shane Estabrooks Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2014
    Messages:
    543
    Likes:
    347
    Very cool, first I've heard of buying one new... you are so lucky. Around here the Taxi guys buy used police cars, but from what I've heard they de-tune them first. Are you you going to race this car at tracks? Lets see some pictures. I like the moon wheel covers, I put them on my 09 Ram winter tire rims ... looked cool. Most importantly is that you have excepted the attitude that comes with the car.. sounds like you are the right person for that car... enjoy.
     
  3. AHBGuru

    AHBGuru Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2015
    Messages:
    210
    Likes:
    89
    I am not aware of any taxi companies presently using the Charger, Caprice, or the new Ford police vehicles. I think that's because there are still plenty of Crown Vics available on the market, and the cost is less than half of the equivalent Dodge. Resale value of a Clean Hemi Pursuit is about double of the same year and mileage Crown Vic.

    I am not aware that any of the newer cars can be de-tuned, and the cost of doing so would likely outweigh any gain. Years ago, definitely, some cab companies would replace their 4-bbl carbs with a 2-bbl, but that was often more trouble and expense than it was worth. It did become somewhat more common to convert a Diplomat or Fury to propane, and Chrysler had actually engineered and sold kits to convert a ThermoQuad or Quadrajet car to that fuel source. Back then, Ford Chevy and Mopar all sold a taxi version of their big cars as well. The P70 Crown Vic through 2011 was a specific taxi model.

    I won't be racing this hot-rod, I bought this car to drive, and since it's new with very low mileage, I might hang onto it as a 'survivor' at some point down the road. Although I've always set up all of my old cruisers for top-end performance, I've never raced any of them.

    Just a note on the small hub covers used on the Charger squads: These hubcaps require specific lug nuts and would most likely not fit another vehicle. The full-size 18" wheel covers utilize stock length lugnuts, but would only fit the 18" steel wheels for RWD squads. Starting in late 2014, the Charger could be ordered with the Hemi and AWD. Those cars use different wheels and wheel covers.
    I chose to stick with the small ones for now.

    Yes, the right attitude is very important. Impersonating an officer is a felony in every state and province, so the best advice I would give is drive slow, wave, and smile. Most people except the jerkoffs reply with the same, and that really makes it that much more fun to own !!!

    According to my local dealership and Chrysler Fleet, anyone can buy or order a new Charger Pursuit, but not with the Mopar Police Accessory options (emergency lights, graphics, etc). Fleet vehicles are not included in any incentive offerings, nor would such a vehicle qualify for Chrysler Bid Assistance, which is where the steep discounts come from. Each dealer is free to set his or her own price, so the likelihood of receiving anything close to bid price is very slim. My car stickered for $34475, and I was able to buy it at cost. That kind of deal realistically don't happen with any kind of frequency, so you can see my motivation to accept the offer.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. wtxiceman

    wtxiceman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2009
    Messages:
    646
    Likes:
    560
    Does it have the 5.7?
     
  5. valiant67

    valiant67 Rich Corinthian Leather
    Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2003
    Messages:
    31,971
    Likes:
    11,540
    The small caps were the same part as used in Intrepid police too.

    You can also swap on the small caps from the chrome rims used on 94-96 Dakotas, as I did with my 2007 Magnum AHB (doesn't make as much sense with newer cars without the ram's head logos). Same cap but with an embossed ram's head instead of a plain center.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. AHBGuru

    AHBGuru Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2015
    Messages:
    210
    Likes:
    89
    Yes, it is a Hemi.
     
  7. AHBGuru

    AHBGuru Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2015
    Messages:
    210
    Likes:
    89
    This information is INCORRECT.

    My fault.
    After consulting with a Chrysler Fleet Rep, Chrysler has never promoted the retail sale of a Law Enforcement Vehicle to a retail customer.
    Ford and Chevrolet no longer offer their Interceptor/PPV products to retail customers, either.

    The dealership where I purchased it from got an exception, and long story short, I really, really lucked out.
     
    Shane Estabrooks likes this.
  8. valiant67

    valiant67 Rich Corinthian Leather
    Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2003
    Messages:
    31,971
    Likes:
    11,540
    Though the wheels are different sizes, the bolt circles are all very close, so the difference could be nothing more than the shoulders on the lug nuts for the small caps.
    Intrepid bolt circle 5x114mm
    Dakota bolt circle 6x114.3mm
    Charger/Magnum bolt circle 5x115mm
    Though they carry different part numbers, people are running the Intrepid caps on the Chargers and they fit just like they should. Like I said, I've had the Dakota ones on my Magnum with no issues. They fit just like the originals.
     
  9. AHBGuru

    AHBGuru Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2015
    Messages:
    210
    Likes:
    89
    You are correct, Valiant, different luggies. I don't advise using the old method of hammering the caps on, either. Glad I stopped trying that before I wrecked one, almost $60 for a new one !!!
     
  10. Bearhawke

    Bearhawke Things happen for a reason

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2003
    Messages:
    13,604
    Likes:
    334
    That's one thing I've never understood: why 'police package' vehicles aren't sold to the general public; especially in light of today's crop of high performance vehicles having essentially the same mechanicals i.e. suspension, brakes, cooling, etc. I'd think 'police' features would be a selling point where durability was concerned; it's not that the cop cars are any faster with retail only vehicles like the SRT8's and Hellcats being able to outrun any squad out there. As for obvious police equipment like spotlights, wig-wags, etc.; yes, those should remain 'fleet' only.
     
  11. voiceofstl

    voiceofstl Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2010
    Messages:
    975
    Likes:
    328
    Unless you have a push bar on the front I would think only a real mopar fan would know its a cop car.
     
  12. AHBGuru

    AHBGuru Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2015
    Messages:
    210
    Likes:
    89

    Chrysler has always had this policy, the whole time, from the beginning of their police cars in 1956. Ford and Chevy had policies that changed over the years, but both have since joined Chrysler in the elimination of retail consumer purchase option.

    Since the demise of the Crown Vic, which was a fleet-only car from 2008 until it finally croaked in 2011, the best selling squads are the Exploder and the Charger, followed by the Taurus, Tahoe, Wimpala, Ram, and Durango.
    Except for the Caprice and Wimpala, these vehicles are all largely the same in appearance as their retail counterparts.

    The reason for the tight control over who buys one of these cars is the possibility of a whacker (police impersonator) getting ahold of one and running around with lights and siren going, scaring men, women, children, and the horses alike.
    They don't want this to happen.

    When I bought mine, the first thing I did was meet with the local police department, show them the car, and made a deal with them that they would call me if they got complaints about someone running around pretending to be a cop. They have seen the car inside and out, under the hood and trunk. The only auxiliary lighting is the factory LED spotlight, and inside is the factory red/white LED dome light. No other modifications of any kind. When I first took it to my local dealership for inspection, they also documented the inside and outside of the car - apparently at the request of Chrysler Fleet.

    The message was very clear - drive slow, pay it off fast, and do not try to draw any extra attention. Unfortunately, I have no control over how others react when they see me. More than once, I've been mistaken for an officer. When someone needs help and theyre looking for a cop, it's not amusing in any way to be mistaken for one. Fortunately, I live in a small town, I travel through small towns, they all know the car, and it's cool.

    I bought the car with the idea that it's brand new, 2 model years old, and since I don't travel a lot, it will probably be a museum piece in due time. Sure, I get on it once in a while, and it Goes Like Hell, but even that kind of fun draws attention I dont need - the car doesn't have an air silencer under the filter box, and sounds exactly like one of my old ThermoQuad or QJet Furys or Diplomats !!!
     
    Shane Estabrooks likes this.
  13. AHBGuru

    AHBGuru Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2015
    Messages:
    210
    Likes:
    89

    It actually works the other way around.

    For example:

    Anyone who owns or owned an old Diplomat or Fury, etc, especially back in the day when they were still in service, will understand this:
    Once folks figure out what's being used for a police car, like a Charger or Taurus, etc - then ALL of those vehicles look like a police car to them. Especially if any of the squads in question are unmarked, because those cars typically do not have the pushers, spotlights, baby hubcaps, etc, that most marked units have.

    In my case, I had a brown 2013 SE retail Charger that I traded in for this car. Even with the rinky-dink 17" factory rims and tires on that car, it still got a lotta glances from folks in the area, because our State Patrol fleet is about a third Chargers, most unmarked.
     
  14. patricklynch

    patricklynch Happy R body St. Regis driver, blissed out Plymout

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2003
    Messages:
    4,181
    Likes:
    16
    I could not agree more. I consider all Chargers, Crown Vics, Impalas, Ford Explorers and Chevy Tahoes to be potential police vehicles when I'm on the road. Until I know for sure I'm looking at a late Grand Marquis, they get lumped in with Crown Vics until I can see them better. The Kentucky State Police for example is running Crown Vics, Chargers and Impalas right now. Marked and unmarked. Nearby communities have their own mix, you can tell whose budgets are tighter by the number of Crown Vics still in operation.
     
  15. Fast Eddie

    Fast Eddie Valued Member
    Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2014
    Messages:
    1,511
    Likes:
    1,364
    Click on the Get Employee Price link below for your special price
    make=Dodge&model=Charger& 51 auto-new /new-inventory/index.htm
    Show Only
    Keyword
    Reset Filters


     
  16. AHBGuru

    AHBGuru Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2015
    Messages:
    210
    Likes:
    89
    There are lots of ads like this. But if you were to actually call to get the price, you will be told that you can't actually buy the car unless you're a registered Chrysler Fleet customer.
    Again, the updated information I posted is directly from FCA - Fleet. They sell the cars and determine the rules.
    If you, or anyone else disagrees would like to dispute that info, take it up with them.
     
  17. ScottB

    ScottB Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2003
    Messages:
    2,884
    Likes:
    2,296
    Just bumped into the police sergeant that takes care of our local fleet at the garage yesterday and he was telling me they're having cam problems with the 5.7L Chargers. He was there to pick up one that had just been repaired. So far three of them have required cam replacements. The theory is that because they idle a lot that not enough oil is lubricating the cams and they start to wear. Have you heard of any other departments experiencing this problem? They used to have Crown Vics before the Chargers. Because of the cam issue and other problems they've experienced, their latest purchase was a Ford Explorer. The sergeant said they are unlikely to purchase anymore Chargers and Explorers are the direction they're heading in. That was disappointing to hear.
     
  18. AHBGuru

    AHBGuru Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2015
    Messages:
    210
    Likes:
    89

    Yes, I have heard a similar type of story. Some of the cars have lost a cam, but unknown for certain whether it's LX or LD cars, and what kind of service they're in, and maintenance theyre getting.
    One area department had a couple of cars over the last several model years lose a cam. Those cars have the 3.06 rear, and were also included in the timing chain/tensioner campaign.
    An adjacent department that uses both LX and LD cars with the 2.65 rear has not had any issues with the cam or timing chain components.
    According to an area dealership, the Chevy with the 6.0 also has cam issues.

    What isn't making any sense is that both the Dodge and the Chevy use hydraulic roller lifters in both V8 engines. I question the lubrication explanation. My car has excellent oil pressure, 35-40 psi at idle hot, and 50+ up the tachometer. I think the engines are getting enough oil. If the cam cores themselves are a bit "soft", or the valve springs are really stiff, either of those two items, or both, would seem to make more sense.

    I would also note that in every case, at least here, the motors in question were still under the big warranty. Aside from the inconvenience of having the squad down for several days, there is no additional cost to the department. I would also note that it was certainly not unheard of for a Diplomat or Gran Fury to lose a cam back in the day, and the warranties back then were generally 5/50, and 7/70 at the end. Departments didnt go jumping ship to Ford or Chevy because of that. There's more to the story than we're hearing, because the Taurus has become a flop, and the Exploder has its own fun issues of transmission and transfer case failures.

    I smell some politics with this .
     
  19. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
    Staff Member Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2001
    Messages:
    32,380
    Likes:
    15,048
    Years ago when the Hemi Charger was still fairly new, I did hear from police department maintenance folks saying they'd destroyed a few engines using the wrong oil. Chrysler Fleet would come down, fix some engines, make the police pay for others, depending on how much damage there was. Some were writeoffs. I don't know why but they assumed that if it worked for a 1970s technology Crown Vic, it would work for a real police car, too.
     

Share This Page

Loading...