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Policy changes?

Discussion in 'Car Dealer Hangout' started by Dave Z, Oct 7, 2016.

  1. valiant67

    valiant67 Rich Corinthian Leather
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    Fitted metal brake lines are seldom available new and probably quite cost prohibitive. This brake work sounds like it would be better for an independent shop than a dealer.
    I have read on other boards that the stainless brake line kits (made for many classic cars) end up being harder to seal than the metal lines. That, besides cost, may be another reason stainless is not used.
     
    Doug D likes this.
  2. ImperialCrown

    Level III Supporter

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    Stainless steel is not as ductile as regular steel line. It is almost more 'brittle' (for lack of a better word) to form bends and flared ends as well.
    There are different grades of stainless for different applications. It sure helps to keep exhaust systems good for 10+ years.
     
    Bob Lincoln and superduckie5000 like this.
  3. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

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    I agree stainless steel is great for exhaust systems. My '06 Ram 1500 still has the original SS exhaust after 10+ years and 235K miles.
     
  4. 65Marlin

    65Marlin Member

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    Thanks everyone, I appreciate the input. The Breeze is my wife's car and she wants to keep it and wants our favorite Chrysler dealer (where she bought it new in 99) to do the work. I know they will do a first class job even though they seem reluctant and they are making it eye wateringly expensive.
    That 10 year support thing came up the first time a couple of years ago when my 99 Stratus needed the horn fixed. The dealer said the horn switch was bad (under the air bag) and they could not get any replacement. Said it was the same for Sebrings too, They just couldn't (or wouldn't) fix it. I wonder if the dealers are being advised by "higher ups" not to take on any older car repairs? Not profitable? Want to force folks to look at new cars? Are older Chrysler/ Dodge / Plymouth cars in the way of Fiat products maybe?
     
  5. ImperialCrown

    Level III Supporter

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    Rust shouldn't be too bad a problem in Oklahoma, or is it?
    Hand-forming brake lines is labor intensive and may be the bulk of the cost.
    Our dealership had a reduced labor rate for brake and exhaust work so we could be somewhat competitive with the independent shops.
    Valueline offered reduced cost Mopar parts that matched the independent shop competition prices as well. Shoes, wheel cylinders and brake hardware don't have to be Mopar.
    A company like Wagner probably makes the same brake parts for Mopar.
     
  6. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

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    My son had a '97 Mercury where the horn switch in the middle of the steering wheel was broken. The part was available but on the expensive side - more than he or I were willing to spend. Ended up putting a horn button on the dash. It worked and passed inspection.

    Quite often some sales are generated from the service dept. Either the needed part is unavailable or the repair is deemed to expensive by the owner. So they end up purchasing a new or near new car. We ended up with our '10 Journey that way. The '09 Journey we had went "Christine" on us (idiot lights cycling on/off - bad CAN C Bus). Repair was too much for us (didn't have the funds and it was out of warranty). Ended up trading it for a lightly used '10 Journey SXT.
     
  7. DC-93

    DC-93 Active Member

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    Absolutely TRUE. here NEVER was anything about '10 years' as a time limit to keep any part required for a car in stock. I'd stockpile the wear items way before that, if planning to keep a car for a long time.

    I'd be doing that NOW for Dart and 200 parts, if I had one, if you want to keep it all MoPar Parts.
     
    JA Cumbo likes this.
  8. ImperialCrown

    Level III Supporter

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    Especially crash parts if you're in the collision repair business. They get rare quick.
    There is a 1991 Buick Reatta just sitting in a lot near here because it has the front end stoved in with no reasonable parts to be had.
    A nice personal coupe somewhat like a small Riviera.
     
  9. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    I remember the Reatta... nice as I vaguely recall.

    A lot of the piddly parts disappear, even on high volume cars... it's a real problem. I hope that someday we can do more "parts on demand" but that requires the manufacturer to keep a few old CATIA (or whatever) workstations and the blueprints... and be willing to share.
     
  10. JA Cumbo

    JA Cumbo Enjoying the ride.
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    As expensive as it was to have repaired my 2015 Dart, I have a feeling NOS parts to repair one in ten years time will be very pricey.
     
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  11. paullybob

    paullybob Well-Known Member

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    Factory lines of that era and many still are galvanized steel. They are resistant to some degree to corrosion but if you live in the Rust Belt or in Canada where salt is judiciously applied to winter roads, you definitely need them replaced after 10 years. Aftermarket manufacturers have caught on and have started making these lines as factory replacement stainless steel lines, mainly for trucks and SUV's for some reason. Bulk and manufactured lines in stainless and PVC coated steel are available in any good Automotive store and should be inexpensive to purchase, the installation however is a PITA (and expensive) in most cases!!

    Generally, most well stocked Automotive stores will stock parts back to 10 years old but make most of their money on new or nearly new vehicle repair parts (i.e. brake pads, spark plugs, struts/shocks, fluids, etc) BUT have access to older vehicle parts undeniably!! Your "friendly" CDJR dealer doesn't want you to fix your older vehicle, they want you to buy new hence their hesitation to supply or even look for your parts. Sad but true!! I recommend finding a good younger mechanic and stick with them as your vehicle and you get older. Build up a relationship so they know what you want to spend and so that you trust that they have your best interests in hand as well.
     
    Dave Z likes this.
  12. Bob Lincoln

    Bob Lincoln "CHECK FAULT CODES"
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    I looked at buying a 98 Breeze recently, and among other problems, I noticed that the owner had rigged a pushbutton on the left side of the dash. Guess this was a chronic problem.
     
  13. 65Marlin

    65Marlin Member

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    Ah yes, that must be a horn button. I was looking into installing some kind of aftermarket horn button like that on the Stratus, but the front oil seal gave out first, so the car was retired. Such a shame, I really liked that car.

    By the way, we got the Breeze back and the brakes work just fine now, and it only cost about half what the dealer originally quoted......whew! Now, we have to replace the multifunction switch in the steering column.....$$$.....I wonder what the border is between "repairs" and "restoration"?
     
    ImperialCrown likes this.
  14. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

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    Regarding the horn button, we ended up doing that with my son's previous car - a 1997 Mercury Tracer. The horn pad is in the center of the steering wheel, but the part is crazy expensive. We ended up having a horn button installed on the dash so it would pass inspection.
     

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