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Rear brake noise, 2016 Dodge Durango

Discussion in 'Repairs, Maintenance, Help' started by valiant67, Nov 16, 2017.

  1. valiant67

    valiant67 Rich Corinthian Leather
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    I think it's brake noise, but I can't rule out it being a tire.
    2016 Dodge Durango R/T, 18k miles, just got back from a round trip from Pittsburgh to Atlanta and back.
    I noticed coming down mountains that I'd get a thump-thump-thump noise but only sometimes when braking. It tended to be more noticeable during straight line braking than around curves. Despite the noise, I felt nothing in the steering wheel (like a warped front rotor would do) and very little real vibration, though there was some, connected to the noise.

    Does this sound like a rear rotor? Or possibly a bad tire? Sometime it almost felt like the rear had a wobbly tire in some curves (and the tires are crap Bridgestone Eco somethings) though I can't notice anything from looking at the tires.

    Any thoughts? What type of parking brake setup is used? Is there an internal drum or does the parking brake use the discs?

    It's a Certified PreOwned, not sure if any of this falls under the CPO warranty.
     
  2. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

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    I guess I'd start with checking the tires first (or have a shop inspect them). I'm at a loss as to what would cause an intermitent thumping. Only downhill? Maybe there is enough weight transfer the rear tire(s) is bouncing on the pavement? I've had my Ram do something similar, but that was under very hard braking with little or no load in the bed. Check the lug nuts for looseness - almost sounds like a loose wheel (a la NASCAR where the pit crew doesn't get all the lug nuts tight).

    I assume you have 4 wheel disc so I would think the rear brakes would have an internal drum like my '06 Ram does, but I'm not sure of a '16 Durango.

    Maybe one of the rear hubs is going bad? I dunno.
     
  3. valiant67

    valiant67 Rich Corinthian Leather
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    If I can find a local spot where I can reproduce this regularly, I'll swap the "full size" spare in place of one of the rear tires and try it.
    "Full size" spare = 18" steel wheel with 20" road wheels.

    I'm not keen on taking it to the dealer without some idea of what is going on since it was a used car purchase. I can't even find the text of the CPO warranty on line. I'll grab the torque wench and check things - I think they had to pull 2 or 4 wheel for the state inspection when they took it in trade in August.
     
  4. 1999 White C5 Coupe

    1999 White C5 Coupe Well-Known Member

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    Your vehicle should be covered under the manufacturer's new-car warranty. Why wouldn't you take it to a Dodge dealer for diagnosis and repair? Although you bought it used, that should have no bearing on a defect and warranty repair.
     
  5. valiant67

    valiant67 Rich Corinthian Leather
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    Brakes are only covered on a new vehicle for 12 months/12k miles. Unless the CPO warranty increases that, I'm not paying dealer rates for a brake job (and this dealer is one that suggests a lot of unnecessary service in my limited dealings with them).
     
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  6. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

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    The only way I see it is the brakes would be something loose in the parking brake set up inside the disc. And as Mark pointed out this would not be covered under warranty beyond 12M/12,000 miles since it is considered a wear item.
     
  7. bguy

    bguy Well-Known Member

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    Make sure the wheel is tight is the first thing I'd check.
     
  8. ImperialCrown

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    I agree that lug nuts are the first and easiest thing to check.
    Inspect the brake rotors for any discolored spots on the inner and outer brake pad contact surfaces. 'Blueing' from heat may make a 'thump' every time a pad passes over the spot while braking. The rotor may not show an excessive runout with a dial micrometer, but the tempered spot can still make noise without pedal pulsation. Generally a hotspot can't be turned out on a lathe and rotor replacement is best.
    Hard or some semi-metallic pads can be harsh on rotor braking surfaces. I prefer the ceramics for all-around benefits.
     
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