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Replacing inner CV boot (300m)

Discussion in 'LH: Large Cars, 1993-2004' started by MoPar~Man, Sep 20, 2017.

  1. MoPar~Man

    MoPar~Man Member

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    I decided to create a new thread on this topic. This is a continuation from my last thread (about what turns out to be a leaking front shock).

    I can't find any video's of someone taking apart the inner CV boot. I see lots of video's of people pulling the whole shaft out and replacing it. I see that it takes some prying to get the inner tripod joint pulled off the transmission stub shaft. This seems to be because you're pulling the joint over the "circlip" (circle clip?) that's sitting in a groove near the end of the stub shaft. There doesn't seem to be a way to get at and remove the circlip before sliding the joint off the shaft - and more to the point, how do you install a new circlip without mangling it by forcing the joint back on when you reinstall it? The service manual says to always replace the circlip (and nearby o-ring seal) when you separate the inner tripod joint from the stub shaft. Well, I hope I can find those items locally, because the boot kit doesn't come with them (and, apparently, even new shafts don't always come with them either).

    This has me wondering: Assuming I have enough room to work in there, is it possible to leave the inner tripod joint in-place on the stub shaft, cut the old boot away, remove the snap ring that keeps the spider assembly in place, slide the inter-connecting shaft out (with the spider) and then slide the new boot into position and re-insert the shaft/spider and snap ring? It sure looks like I don't really have to take the tripod joint off the stub shaft if all I'm doing is replacing the boot.

    Comments?
     
  2. MoPar~Man

    MoPar~Man Member

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    Just a quick correction: There is nothing (no snap ring) that keeps the connecting shaft and spider assembly from being pulled out of the tripod housing. So just by removing the bands for the inner boot, I aught to be able to just slide the connecting shaft out (and, I guess, hold the spider together with my free hand as it comes out of the housing?).
     
  3. ImperialCrown

    Level III Supporter

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    There is a 'trilobal tripod bushing' at the opening of the inner joint that is supposed to block the exit of the joint from the housing, but I have seen them forced past this plastic bushing. For normal bench service, the bushing should gently pry off after the band clamp is removed.
    See item # 9 on p. 3-3 here:
    http://oskin.ru/pub/chrysler-dodge/.../2000_LH_LHS_300M_Concorde_Intrepid/ELH_3.PDF
    P.S. - Many times a remanufactured drive shaft is the best way to go as some joint boot kits cost more that a reman shaft.
     
  4. MoPar~Man

    MoPar~Man Member

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    The following is from Section 3-11 (page 11 of pdf you quoted):

    ----------
    The LH platform driveshafts use no retention system to retain the spider assembly in the tripod housing. During removal and installation procedures always support both ends of the driveshaft to prevent damage or disengaging tripod joint. Therefore, do not pull on the interconnecting shaft when attempting to remove drive shafts from vehicle.
    ------------

    Unless its staring me in the face and I'm just not seeing it, this "trilobal tripod bushing" that's shown as item 9 in the exploded view is not seen or mentioned in the disassembly - reassembly section. It's not even identified in Figure 24, for example.

    Here's a random thought: Since the boot is supposed to be made of silicone rubber, if I cleaned the exterior area of the boot where the cut is (which is about an inch long) with sufficient solvents (my favorite being laquer thinner), would it not be possible to apply a lump of RTV silicone over the cut area so that the new silicone bonds with the boot and seals the cut? It's been my experience that fresh silicone will bond to (or become insesparable from) objects or items made from cured / dry silicone.
     
  5. Bob Lincoln

    Bob Lincoln "CHECK FAULT CODES"
    Level 2 Supporter

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    It's your car, you can do what you want. Any cut means that dirt has entered the joint, and grease has exited. I would replace it.

    RTV will not provide sufficient shear strength in any bond to the existing boot, and will break loose under use.
     
  6. MoPar~Man

    MoPar~Man Member

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    The ebay item is listed at $102. The Amazon item is listed at (get ready for this) $209. (I buy 1 or 2 items from ebay every 2 or 3 months, for maybe the past 5 years. I have yet to sign up for Amazon or buy anything from them). Both these prices are ridiculous.

    I picked up something locally labeled as "Duraflex" made by Mevotech (DX241) for $15 (that's CAD). Came with a really nice squeeze tube of 90 grams of molybdenum-based CV joint lubricant and 2 band clamps. I did clean the boot where I tore it and apply some Permatex Ultrablack silicone gasket sealant yesterday. Car hasn't been driven since the tear, no grease has leaked out of it, and nothing got in. I'll have a look later today, see if I can pull the permatex off the boot. The stuff cures relatively quickly, my impression after a few hours is that it's going to work. If it looks good, I'll leave it and check it ever once in a while. I have to replace the leaky strut, maybe today, I have a new replacement ($150) ready to go. And I have replaced this front wheel bearing before, so the hub nut would be easy to take off if I wanted too.

    I probably could leave the hub nut in place, and be able to separate the CV joint just by pulling out the spider assembly when the strut is detached and taken out. I understand that there are split-boots, not sure what sort of reputation they have for durability, etc.
     
  7. MoPar~Man

    MoPar~Man Member

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    Ok, the new strut is in, took the car for a quick spin, wheels didn't fall off. I'm impressed with the permatex boot fix. I'll check the boot in a week or two and see how its holding up.
     
  8. MoPar~Man

    MoPar~Man Member

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    Ok, checked the silicone patch job on the boot. It's still in perfect shape. Still very clean around where I wiped it down with solvent. No sign of peeling off or cracking / splitting. Can't lift or tear it off with my fingers. The original boot, once you wipe the grime away, looks to be an olive green color, with no signs of splitting or cracking anywhere.
     
    ImperialCrown likes this.
  9. MoPar~Man

    MoPar~Man Member

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    Update: At 70 days and 1250 miles, the permatex CV boot fix is in perfect condition, like the day I put it on.

    I was replacing the other front strut today so I checked out the boot. This is the driver's side strut. I've been hearing / feeling a knock on this side for years now, when the car goes over a certain type of road un-even-ness, particularly a dip or depression only on the driver's side. I don't know what it is with these cheap struts internally that gives them this play. Anyways, the knocking is gone now. So I've replaced both front struts twice now and the rears once.

    I see that the allpar site software has changed. It brings the usability down a few notches for me (Windows 98 / Opera 12). Too bad.
     

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