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So I bought that Reliant!

Discussion in 'EEK! - Every Extended-K Car' started by CaravelleMan, Jan 31, 2015.

  1. mydodgedip

    mydodgedip Fleet Owner

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    It's not a terrible job if you keep things organized although it is nice to have a lift and impact gun, then again I'm spoiled. You're in NY, right? If you don't feel confident enough to do it and don't mind taking a ride to NJ my father has a shop in South Orange. He's honest, he's good and he's the cheapest in the area. We also speak fluent Chrysler, K cars are always welcome there.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

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    Even adding the other belts and water pump shouldn't add $600 to a $300 job.

    While I haven't ever changed a timing belt, I have changed the water pump on a 2.5L (FYI - the 2.5 is the same block as a 2.2 with a different stroke). It is somewhat involved as you'll need to remove the AC belt, serpentine belt, AC compressor (move - don't disconnect the lines), alternator, loosen the AC bracket. Then you can get to the water pump and housing. Of course, drain all coolant prior to removing/moving components. It took me 4.5 hours in my driveway with normal wrenches and a socket set. A mechanic in a well equipped shop should be able to do it in 1/3 the time.
     
  3. Bob Lincoln

    Bob Lincoln "CHECK FAULT CODES"
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    The only shaft that spins freely with the belt off is the intermediate shaft. So rotate the engine to top dead center before you start the job, and the cam and crank will be aligned with each other. That makes it easier to verify the intermediate shaft.
     
  4. floridaman2013

    floridaman2013 Active Member

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    As John said, REPLACE the tensioner! I've learned in this business that when a timing belt goes, always replace the tensioner when installing a new belt, as the new tension somehow messes with the preload and causes bearing failure early! I've more of this on the VW engines, L body Omni/Horizon but have also 2.2/2.5 engines. It's a good rule of thumb to follow. Nobody wants to rip the job apart again.
     
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  5. CaravelleMan

    CaravelleMan Active Member

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    Hey thanks for all your responses guys, I'll look into doing it. I'm in the sf bay area of California. So I'm driving to work today and it keeps dying. The Caravelle did that too, I think its a map sensor failure, could it be anything else? I have to keep on the gas a bit to keep it running
     
  6. CaravelleMan

    CaravelleMan Active Member

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    OK made it home, so I checked codes and I'm gettinng 55, I parked and opened the hood and listened. It would stumble and almost die, come back, stumble again, and come back roaring with high rpm and then stumble and die. So I'm gonna check vac lines and order a map cause o'reiley is useless.
     
  7. John Wood

    John Wood Allpar Legacy

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    Just so you know, there won't be a fuel pump relay on your 88 reliant... and pulling the ASD relay won't work. Try unscrewing one of the gas line hoses at the filter and keep a rag loosely around the fuel line as you gently try to twist it off. This is a low pressure (15 psi) system so it probably won't have quick disconnects. It should have solid fuel line clamps. Be prepared for some fuel to dump out of the filter and lines. I generally try to plug the line coming from the tank to avoid any possibility of a siphoning effect that could start a continuous stream of gas as you are preparing to install the new gas filter. Plug both lines if possible. More than likely both flexible lines at the fuel filter will be dry rotted and cracked. Replace with injection rated fuel line SAE 30R9. I believe it is 5/16 inch for the size.
     
  8. CaravelleMan

    CaravelleMan Active Member

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    I replaced the MAP sensor and its running exactly the same. I guess I'll return that :/
     
  9. CaravelleMan

    CaravelleMan Active Member

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    It dies after idling for about 45 seconds :( omg
     
  10. CaravelleMan

    CaravelleMan Active Member

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    It now even loses power when giving it gas, I'll drive it down the blvd, and it'll lose power and all of a sudden come back, I hear a noise coming from the passenger side engine compartment but can tell what it is. It sounds like something engaging when it comes back
     
  11. Bob Lincoln

    Bob Lincoln "CHECK FAULT CODES"
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    That would be the ASD relay, which in older K-cars, is behind the passenger kickpad. The Hall effect pickup in the distributor might be responsible for this, although it should store a code 11.
     
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  12. John Wood

    John Wood Allpar Legacy

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    I believe on an 88, the ASD relay would be located next to the SMEC on the driver's side inside fender, but I need to research that further. I believe by 1988 all EEK cars had gone to the SMEC and the seperate logic/power modules were gone (incorporated into the one module).

    Could this just be the AC compressor kicking on and off (i.e. in the defrost mode or even regular AC since he is in SOCAL)?

    A nearly frozen AC compressor hub bearing could cause the engine to die at idle, however, now that it is cutting out at speed, I tend to agree that the Hall-Effect PU may be the cause.
     
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  13. John Wood

    John Wood Allpar Legacy

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    Here is what I show for the ASD relay location:

    [​IMG]
     
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  14. floridaman2013

    floridaman2013 Active Member

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    As anyone here can tell you, these kind of problems are the worst to fix as without some kind of fault code, you really have to have some experience in different running conditions to figure out what is failing. Hall Effect switches in the distributor were famous for this when they got hot, sort of like the "old" ballast resistors of early Electronic ignition days. Always keep one spare in the car! I've also had bad ignition coils do this, cracked, leaking oil, arcing.
     
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  15. CaravelleMan

    CaravelleMan Active Member

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    Thank you everyone for your input. When I did the tune up I realized I didn't get a hall effect, I had everything out so I went ahead with the tune up anyways. My fault. The car is currently at where I purchased it, they are fixing the fuel gauge. I'll pick up a hall effect on my way to get it today hopefully that will fix it.
     
  16. Bob Lincoln

    Bob Lincoln "CHECK FAULT CODES"
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    It's not a tuneup item, but they have their share of problems. My belief is that the actual pickup isn't the issue, it's the ribbon cable getting pinched and/or the connector being intermittent.
     
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  17. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

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    Agree with Floridaman - it's a good habit to carry a spare Hall Effect. Bob's correct - often the connecting wire/cable gets pinched or otherwise damaged. And no, it's not a normal tuneup item as the plugs, wires, rotor and cap are.

    I have usually found that a bad HE will cause the engine to die. Wait 10-15 min for it to cool and it'll start right up like nothing was wrong.
     
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  18. CaravelleMan

    CaravelleMan Active Member

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    OK so weird day yesterday. I dropped it off with the seller cause he was going to fix fuel gauge. A few hours later he calls and says its done. He made no mention of the stalling issue. I pick it up, they had replaced the fuel pump and level thing in the tank. I started it up and it ran real strong. I sat and waited for it to die, and it didn't. So I drove it around for 1 mile and the problem came back. So it died 4 times on the way back to the shop.

    I pulled in and he went under the hood and he messed around under the air cleaner at the EGR valve. He said the problem sounds like a vacume issue. After he tightened some loose connections the car ran fine. I drove it for the remainder of the night with no problems.

    Now I go to work today and the same issue has arisen again. Could the tubes be coming loose? I'm gonna check them after work. I'm still gonna pick up the hall today too if someone has it in stock otherwise its rockauto
     
  19. CaravelleMan

    CaravelleMan Active Member

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    Another thing when its beginning to stall I still hear that loud thump under the hood. It sounds similar to when my ac engages in the Jetta. But I don't have the ac on, its not charged:eek:
     
  20. Bob Lincoln

    Bob Lincoln "CHECK FAULT CODES"
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    That noise might simply be an engine mount that's wearing out, and as the engine stalls, it rocks in its mounts. To test it, have someone watch the engine while you idle with parking brake and foot brake firmly set, and just give it a little gas briefly in D and R. Engine should not rock either forward or back more than about 1/2 to 3/4 inch.
     

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