Hello, Allpar Forums member or visitor! If you were a member, you would not see this ad!

Register or log in at the top right of the page...

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Speed limiter

Discussion in 'Non-Mopar Tech Support' started by 55Plaza, Sep 25, 2017.

  1. 55Plaza

    Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2005
    Messages:
    1,129
    Likes:
    119
    Does anyone know how to limit the top speed of a car. My 97+ year old mother insists on driving, she has a 2001 Buick Century V6. My brother-in-law disabled her car so she can't drive (which has made her angry). However winter is coming and rather than walking up town (she lives in a community of about 400) for groceries & mail pickup, she'd like to drive to save falling down and getting hurt (or worse).
    I can find how to increase a top speed, but not how to limit the speed to say 25 mph.
    Any ideas?
     
  2. sickboy

    sickboy Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2011
    Messages:
    414
    Likes:
    311
    Half joking, glue a block of wood under the accelerator. Might not limit top speed but would keep her from abrupt acceleration. Or if it has a throttle cable, adjust it so she can only achieve maybe 20%? That would at least be easily put back to normal
     
  3. chuzz

    chuzz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2004
    Messages:
    6,796
    Likes:
    459
    Drill a hole in the floorboard and put a long bolt in it under the gas pedal. If you weld a nut to the floorboard under the car and use one on the large bolt inside, you can adjust it up or down and lock it down when you find the right height.
     
  4. Bob Lincoln

    Bob Lincoln "CHECK FAULT CODES"
    Level 2 Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2002
    Messages:
    29,875
    Likes:
    3,255
    Best thing is to just stop her from driving. 25 mph can still kill people under the wrong circumstances.
     
    tomit, valiant67 and Doug D like this.
  5. valiant67

    valiant67 Rich Corinthian Leather
    Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2003
    Messages:
    31,677
    Likes:
    10,951
    I would find a way to have the license revoked. Perhaps there is an anonymous way to report it then a physician can make the decision. I just went through that in Florida earlier this year.

    She needs to use a Taxi, Uber or any local senior service transportation rather than walking or driving. Both are too dangerous.
     
    Doug D, tomit and Bob Lincoln like this.
  6. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2009
    Messages:
    1,521
    Likes:
    240
    Transportation options might be limited in a town of only 400 people. The next-door neighbor here in metro Detroit, a widow now 90 years old, hasn't been driving for some time. Her son and daughter take turns looking in on her, the neighbors occasionally stop by, and she hired a woman to come in every Friday morning to take her grocery shopping, and anywhere else she needs to go (doctor's office, for example). She had an '88 Cougar in the garage, but didn't drive it, and eventually gave it to her daughter.

    Dad, on the other hand, developed locomotor ataxia in his early 80s. He still wanted to drive, but after not braking in time in the garage once, my sister took the keys away from him. After she explained the situation when I next visited, I told him he shouldn't drive. She lived with him, and did all the driving for his last 7 years or so, taking him where he needed to go.

    One former neighbor up here kept driving well into his 90s without incident. He was lucid and energetic until his last few months, and no one knew how old he was unless he told them. We never had any fears when we saw his car coming.

    So, it might depend on the individual. But if you have any trepidation about your Mom driving, she probably shouldn't be driving at all. Either arrange a live-in situation with one of your siblings (or your offspring, or nephews, or nieces), or take turns looking after her, or hire help to take her where she needs to go. She won't like it, but the sooner you make the adjustment, the better off everyone will be.
     
    Doug D likes this.
  7. 55Plaza

    Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2005
    Messages:
    1,129
    Likes:
    119
    We're looking into at least driver's licence restrictions. She's taken the 55+ course a few times & passed. We're both in small rural communities (mine's about 1,600), there is no such thing as taxi or uber in her community, but there is a senior bus in mine.

    We've already "disabled her car so she can't drive." She wants to be able to drive about 2 blocks (sometimes a bit more) in town, and up to 22 miles to another town & back, so that's why I said a limit of 25 mph. Probably 12 - 15 mph would be enough.
     
  8. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2000
    Messages:
    12,143
    Likes:
    1,647
    Hide the keys. :D
     
    Bob Lincoln likes this.
  9. valiant67

    valiant67 Rich Corinthian Leather
    Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2003
    Messages:
    31,677
    Likes:
    10,951
    If there are no other options available, the car needs to remain disabled and family and friends provide transportation. There is no other safe way to do it. Limiting accelerator movement does not limit speed within reason (it just increases the time it takes to accelerate).
     
    Doug D likes this.
  10. Tomguy

    Level 2 Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2011
    Messages:
    1,028
    Likes:
    616
    Out of curiosity, how can she safely drive 22 miles at a max of 25MPH? That's nearly an hour on the road. And I am unsure about where you live, but I can't think of anywhere that you'd be able to drive 22 miles at 25MPH Max and not be a danger to everyone else on the road due to impeding traffic.

    If you can get a way to program the computer (since even a 2001 car will be able to do it) it'd be the only way to accurately and safely set a maximum speed, other than installing a third-party device. You would probably need something like a Raspberry Pi that could read the speed, and then cut the fuel delivery to the engine at 26MPH, and re-enable it at 24, sort of like a factory governor would.

    Edit: Heck you could probably just do it with an Arduino clone off eBay but it'd involve knowing how to read the feed for speed, and then programming the Arduino with a relay to the fuel pump to turn it on or off at those speeds.
     
  11. Bob Lincoln

    Bob Lincoln "CHECK FAULT CODES"
    Level 2 Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2002
    Messages:
    29,875
    Likes:
    3,255
    I keep thinking of the elderly woman here who put her car in reverse, stepped on the gas instead of the brake, and launched her car across the road, took down a chain link fence, back about 15 feet, hit a parking curb, and flipped the car backwards, airborne, into the river, which was 20 feet deep. And helplessly looked back at bystanders as she sank and drowned.
     
    tomit likes this.
  12. Bob Lincoln

    Bob Lincoln "CHECK FAULT CODES"
    Level 2 Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2002
    Messages:
    29,875
    Likes:
    3,255
    Then there was the time in 1978 when my dad was on a 2-lane divided highway, and rose up a crest in the road to find a Valiant stopped perpendicular to the road. My dad slammed on his brakes, still hit the car at about 30 mph, spun it CCW into his left rear fender. Fortunately, others stopped behind them. They were on a bridge 20 feet above a 2-lane road below.
    No injuries, but the other car was totaled, and my dad's 72 Pontiac Grandville survived, although the insurance company wanted to total it financially. It was repaired.
    The driver, an 87-yr old man, told my dad that he was heading to the next town up, thought he missed his exit, and was turning around. My dad told him, You can't turn around on a one-way highway, and the man said, Yes, I can.
    When the state police arrived and asked what happened, the man told them that he was just driving along and my dad came up from behind and hit him. The trooper said, I can see from the damage that's not what happened. Then the man broke down, admitted what he did, said his wife was an invalid and he couldn't afford to lose his license. The trooper told my dad that he would be notified in 2 weeks when the man had a hearing at the RMV.
    My dad was never notified.
    I looked up online and found that the man lived to 91 yrs old. Presumably he kept driving, hopefully he didn't kill anyone. We had lost my mother to cancer 3 months before this, and when we heard about the accident, couldn't help but think that we almost became orphans that day, but for my dad's reflexes and large car.

    Don't let her drive anymore.
     
    Tomguy and Doug D like this.
  13. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2000
    Messages:
    12,143
    Likes:
    1,647
    As far as I know my grandfather still had his license when he died at 81 years of age. However, that doesn't mean he was a safe driver. I heard stories of him taking 30+ minutes to go 1/8 mile to the store. He had a '67 Impala and would drive so slow as to be a hazard in traffic. This was in a small town. I don't know if the family was ever able to have his license taken away, but I believe they finally just took the keys away from him and made arrangements for him to get to the store or went to the store for him.

    What's even scarier is my stepfather (81 years old), while able to drive, sometimes loses awareness of where he is. One time after just going to the grocery store, he went to the hardware store and couldn't remember how to get back to the grocery store or the house. The two stores are less than a mile apart.
     
    Bob Lincoln likes this.
  14. Bob Lincoln

    Bob Lincoln "CHECK FAULT CODES"
    Level 2 Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2002
    Messages:
    29,875
    Likes:
    3,255
    My grandmother developed Alzheimer's, and we didn't recognize it at first, and back in the late 60s, people called it senility or 'hardening of the arteries'.
    We were vacationing on Cape Cod, 75 miles away, when we looked up to see our grandmother walking across the beach toward us. My dad asked, Mom, what are you doing here? Then she suddenly was aware of her surroundings and what she had done. My dad steered her back to the highway with a map and written directions that afternoon. Looking back, that was too much of a chance to take.
    At that point (80 years old), he took the car away, and she was dependent on relatives driving her and bringing her things. Within 2 years she couldn't remember real events from TV, and was forgetting to eat. She complained of a pain in her side, and my mom took her in the bedroom to find a safety pin through her skin, pinning the dress because she had lost weight. From there she went to a nursing home.
     
    Doug D likes this.
  15. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2000
    Messages:
    12,143
    Likes:
    1,647
    On a related note, Virginia made a change regarding seniors when it comes to license renewal. At age 75+ they must renew their license in person. I'm not sure if they have to retake the written test, but at a minimum they must take the vision test. Previously the age was 80+.
     
  16. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2009
    Messages:
    1,521
    Likes:
    240
    Another potential problem: the car is more than 15 years old, and you live in central Canada. How badly rusted is it? So much that it might be unsafe to drive? That alone might be a good reason not to let her drive it. The car can stand some body rust, but rotted suspension parts and/or frame might make it a junker.
     
  17. 55Plaza

    Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2005
    Messages:
    1,129
    Likes:
    119
    You misread the statement.
     
  18. 55Plaza

    Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2005
    Messages:
    1,129
    Likes:
    119
    Thanks everyone for your comments. I was looking for a technical car response, not what we should do or not do for my mom.
     
  19. GLHS60

    GLHS60 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2008
    Messages:
    1,390
    Likes:
    372
    Some, or many, GM cars have a reverse speed limit of around 25 MPH.

    Maybe others do as well, I only ever noticed this on automatic FWD V6 G.M.'s

    Could one trick the Engine ECM into thinking the car is in reverse while going forward??

    Just thinking out loud.

    Thanks
    Randy
     
  20. Tomguy

    Level 2 Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2011
    Messages:
    1,028
    Likes:
    616
    I know it's a tough choice but we are reaching out due to concern, nobody is trying to tell you what to do but rather show concern for her and other motorists and pedestrians. Hopefully you find the solution that works for you.
     
    Doug D likes this.

Share This Page

Loading...