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Stratuscaster

Discussion in 'Chrysler Chat' started by Dave Z, Feb 22, 2017.

  1. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave Staff Member Supporter

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  2. Zagnut27

    Zagnut27 Jeepaholic Level 2 Supporter

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    No, you're right. In some cases tapping the lung (thoracentesis) is necessary to remove fluid, especially when the fluid is resistant to diuretics. But it's usually for fluid around the lung (pleural effusion). Our patient population includes folks waiting for heart transplant (some get kidneys, livers, or lungs in addition) and we deal with these issues all the time.
     
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  3. dana44

    dana44 Well-Known Member Ad-Free Member

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    Have to be very aware of the fluid in the lungs. My dad had a similar thing happen, doctors thought he was having a heart attack and turned out he had three strains of pneumonia and it took them three days to figure it out. Once they got the antibiotics to take care of that, he was getting better and they wanted to get him out of the hospital to prevent him from catching something else, so he got up, packed, then since the doctor was going to release him in another hour laid back down, fluid shifted and he choked to death. Sad ending for a good hard working man, so don't go signing those DNR papers too early. Had they simply sat him back up the fluid would have shifted again and he would still be here. Hang in there Jim, you are in my prayers.
     
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  4. Zagnut27

    Zagnut27 Jeepaholic Level 2 Supporter

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    Yes. The care you receive can vary wildly from facility to facility (and sometimes from floor to floor within the same facility). We receive patients from all over our area that other hospitals mismanaged and then ship to us because they don't know what else to do. It can be scary, but like anything else, you just have to do your research, ask lots of questions of the doctors (remember, they work FOR you!) and be an advocate for yourself and/or family members. And if you don't like the care you're receiving, you can try to be transferred to another facility for a second opinion.
     
  5. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave Staff Member Supporter

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    That is true. Just make sure you double check the transfer arrangements - ambulances are very expensive and some are covered, some are not! In our area it’s $800 to take a patient with no life threatening issues around three miles. Initially they claimed it was not covered by insurance because the ambulances are separate from the hospital (they have the hospital’s name on them, but it’s not the same company.) Yes, we fought that and no, we didn’t pay.

    Hospitals have some excellent caregivers, some poor ones, and lots of ways to extract dollars... so when this is all over and the bills start coming in, watch for the inappropriate ones and do not hesitate to fight. I generally enlisted the insurance company to fight the hospital; they have power.
     
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  6. aldo90731

    aldo90731 Active Member Level III Supporter

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    My 86 year old dad had a tumor removed from his stomach seven weeks ago. During recovery the nurses and doctors were actively careful he didn't develop pneumonia. Apparently, lying in bed all day increases the chances. He was required to breath deep and hold it for 30 seconds at least once every hour to open up his lungs.

    He received excellent care from Canada's socialized healthcare. He was supposed to be in recovery for three weeks; within two days he was getting up and walking, with help, and got released after 10 days.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2017
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  7. Zagnut27

    Zagnut27 Jeepaholic Level 2 Supporter

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    Yes, very true! And you should see the bill for a helicopter ride for patients that are flown in! Holy cow!

    Lying in bed is a factor. Pain is too. Imagine having your chest opened up, and wired back together and then sutured...along with chest tubes on each flank. At that point, you're a little reluctant to take a deep breath! It helps to hug a pillow when you cough...or take a deep breath. We give devices called an incentive spirometer to the patients too to help them work on their deep breathing.

    Laying in bed also puts you at risk for blood clots in your legs. They can use inflatable sleeves (sequential compression devices) for your legs to help keep the blood moving, but the most effective is prophylactic heparin or lovenox shots in the abdomen. They burn, but they're effective. Sometimes you can't use them though if there's too much risk for bleeding...that's when you switch to the inflatables.
     
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  8. dmcdonald

    dmcdonald Member

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    Just seeing this thread! Wow..total surprise.
    Wishing Strat all the best! He's living my family history so I will be keeping my thoughts positive and fingers crossed.
     
  9. vipergg

    vipergg Active Member

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    Personally I think that is what the US should go to and then there would not be any complaining about who is paying for what and the two parties would have to find something else to piss and moan about.
     
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  10. Citation84

    Citation84 Member

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    Aldo, they gave me a device to blow into to increase my breathing volume when I went in for both my hip replacement operations.

    Didn't really get what it was for, but oh, I do now !
     
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  11. dana44

    dana44 Well-Known Member Ad-Free Member

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    Yes, broken ribs and after a cracked chest, breathing deep will help prevent the accumulation of fluid in the lungs. It might hurt, but not as much as not being able to do it at all.
     
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  12. AC TC

    AC TC Active Member

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    From Aldo "He received excellent care from Canada's socialized Healthcare."

    - Thats just like sweden, yo dont have to bother about hospitalbills and getting an advocate.
     
  13. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave Staff Member Supporter

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    Gak.

    I had the inflatable sleeves, they are annoying but you get used to them.
     
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  14. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave Staff Member Supporter

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    Jamie wrote: “Jim's heart rate? Normal. Jim's blood pressure? Normal. Jim's oxygen level? Normal. Wait for it... breathing tube? Removed! Today is a happy day. I am singing praises and making jokes. God is good.”
     
  15. Zagnut27

    Zagnut27 Jeepaholic Level 2 Supporter

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    You should ask her if they at least changed his oil and rotated his tires during all of this...:p (it's usually one of my better one-liners. Might get a laugh out of him :))
     
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