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temp gauge goes up

Discussion in 'Non-Mopar Tech Support' started by geraldg, Jun 20, 2016.

  1. geraldg

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    not a mopar but when running the A?C the gauge goes up not to hot shut the A/C off it comes back down to normal any ideas.
     
  2. ka9yhd

    ka9yhd Active Member

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    How far does the gauge go up?
     
  3. geraldg

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    normally it is a little below half when driving today it went up between half and 3/4 .half way
     
  4. ka9yhd

    ka9yhd Active Member

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    That sounds a bit much. What is the state of the cooling system? The last time it has been flushed, and what is the condition of the radiator?
     
  5. geraldg

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    The radiator was replaced about 3 years ago and just checked the coolant and the radiator is full and so is the overflow bottle. I am thinking I might check the Freon and see if I am low. Also it was 116 * here today so maybe that might be a factor.
     
  6. Locodave

    Locodave Member

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    Have an electric radiator cooling fan that comes on when the A/C is turned on?
     
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  7. Rickorino

    Rickorino Well-Known Member

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    The freon level will not make your engine run hot. Being 116 degrees might be a good reason. I would check for proper air flow. Make sure the radiator and condenser fins are not blocked. I rencently had a bunch of debris I had to blow out with compressed air. Is the cooling fan working ok? Does it spin freely? When they get older, the fan motor can start to bind and will not spin as fast as it once did.
     
    #7 Rickorino, Jun 21, 2016
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2016
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  8. floridaman2013

    floridaman2013 Active Member

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    At 116 degrees that's enough to make most cooling systems climb! I've driven through a few in my day and had some overheat!
     
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  9. ka9yhd

    ka9yhd Active Member

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    I have had to replace a radiator because the fins were rotting out and falling down blocking the airflow, but you have already said the radiator was replaced 3 years ago so we can rule that out.
     
  10. geraldg

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    Checked the water in the radiator and overflow and they where fine also checked to see if fans coming on and they are. Also about the A/C that was just to see and I figured it had nothing to do but figured I would ask. Before this happened a few times the gauge would climb a little but go back to normal. I love problems like this.:confused:
     
  11. Rick Anderson

    Rick Anderson Well-Known Member

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    If you didn't already know, the AC condenser is in front of the radiator, it will dump heat into the radiator from the AC as the AC runs, putting more stress on the engine cooling system. That is why turning off the AC gets the engine to cool down.

    Like said, the AC charge won't effect the engine cooling, if anything, the weaker the AC runs, the easier it is for the radiator to cool the engine.

    Driving around at 116°F with the AC on full, is stressing your Cooling system to the max. It might just be, that what ever make/model this is, this is the best it can do in these conditions. It might just be the age, the system deteriorated a bit, and can't cool at 100% capacity and it will only be a problem on days that 100% cooling capacity is needed.

    Or there may be something wrong with the cooling system. Another thing to check is scaling and deposits in the cooling system. That is one that might NOT decrease cooling that much and would only show up when you tax the cooling system to 100% of capacity.
     
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  12. AllanC

    AllanC Well-Known Member

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    Curious: what is the year, make, model of vehicle being discussed?
     
  13. geraldg

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    It is a 03 Kia Optima 4 cly with 103 K. About 3 years ago replaced the radiator , thermostat and temp sending unit, never had a problem with it.
     
  14. AllanC

    AllanC Well-Known Member

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    What is the driving situation of the vehicle when A/C is engaged and engine temperature starts to climb? Highway speeds of 50 mph or greater and no stopping? Or stop and go city driving with max speed of 20 mph?
     
  15. geraldg

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    City driving around 40 to 50 mph( we have good roads ) .Also I am thinking about the temp sending unit. Had to find out if it is getting warm or the unit is reading wrong.
     
  16. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    In another thread, Bob Lincoln mentioned that engines have drain plugs in the block that should be removed when draining the cooling system. When I removed it on my Dakota, brown crud came out ahead of the green coolant. After several flushes, it came out a lot more clearly. You might consider removing the drain plug in your car's block. If crud has accumulated in your car's cooling system, it will cause the problem you describe.

    Crud can also accumulate in your heater core, so you might also disconnect the heater hoses and flush it out with a garden hose. That's probably not causing your problem this time of year, but a good flushing should include it.

    And check to make sure all of your clamps are tight enough.
     
  17. AllanC

    AllanC Well-Known Member

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    So if the higher than expected engine temperature gauge reading happens at highway speeds, one can rule out the radiator cooling fans as the problem. At higher road speeds auto designers rely on the increased ram air effect through the condenser and radiator to keep operating temperatures in the proper range. At road speeds electric cooling fans have negligible effect.

    Follow this link on Kia forum and note discussion about overheating.
    04 Optima Overheating - Kia Forum

    You need to use an infrared tool that you point at the radiator and senses temperature. Then you use a scan tool connected to the OBDII port and compare the engine temperature reading from the infrared sensor and the engine temperature the powertrain control module (PCM) is seeing. They should be very close in value. The engine may be within desired operating temperatures but the sending unit is reporting bogus / incorrect analog values to the PCM.

    Also are there any missing air dams under the front bumper? Sometimes vehicle manufacturers use plastic cowling and panels under the front bumper to channel additional air flow over the radiator and condenser. This is necessary for adequate cooling at highway speeds.
     
  18. Rick Anderson

    Rick Anderson Well-Known Member

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    The conditions are such your cooling system is stressed to the max and needs 100% capacity, a 12 year old car likely does NOT have anything on it that is still at 100% of its original capability. So anything wrong with the cooling system that was small enough to go unnoticed before is showing up now. We've already mentioned scaling, deposits and crud in the cooling system as possible "Degraders" to the cooling.

    Another one people forget is a dirty radiator. It doesn't cost anything to hose out the radiator and condenser and wash the dust/dirt out of the cooling fins. Just built up road dirt inbetween the fins will happen, it will cut down on air flow and heat transfer, reducing the cooling capacity of the vehicle. Maybe NOT enough to notice, until a 116°F day when you need every bit of the cooling system that it can provide. So hose it out, if you see mud/dirt coming out, good chance it was the problem, but see if it helps.

    You can't rule out an '03 Kia brand new would run hot under these conditions, these are a once or twice in the life of the car kind of conditions.
     
  19. valiant67

    valiant67 Rich Corinthian Leather
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    i would not assume a 3 year old aftermarket radiator is good. Some are nowhere near OEM quality.
     
  20. geraldg

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    A update, took the car yesterday to get emissions ( it passed ) city and freeway driving. The temp gauge stayed normal but a few times it went up a little bit. When I got home the gauge was reading a little high, after pulling car in garage shut it off then turned the key on, did not start and the gauge went to its normal position. To me if the temp was higher when I turned it on not running it should have went to the higher reading. I am thinking it might be the temp sending unit.
     

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