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The NEW Ongoing Allpar Blunder Recovery System

Discussion in 'Mopar News' started by Dave Z, Mar 26, 2017.

  1. Nick Cass

    Nick Cass Member

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    I appreciate the wealth of information on this site. Even more so I appreciate your willingness to take suggestions from the audience in correcting errors and making this the most authoritative place for the history of anything Mopar. I visit often!
     
    GasAxe, ScramFan and Dave Z like this.
  2. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    Thanks Nick! And you were right. 1998, not 1988.
     
  3. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    I'm not seeing it...?
     
  4. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    He may have meant either the 4th pic down, or the sixth. Someone else will have to determine whether they're current Darts or mini-vans, as I've not been in either.

    In your first paragraph, you state, "the 1960 Dart, which was a midsize Plymouth with Dodge trim,". I don't see it in either of these reports:

    Downsized Dodges: the 1960-1962 Darts (at http://www.allpar.com/model/dart.html )

    Plymouth cars of 1960 including Valiant and Fury (at http://www.allpar.com/history/plymouth/1960.html )

    The Plymouth report states, "Although sharing Plymouth's roofs, doors, rear wheel cutouts and all chassis and mechanical components, the Dart had its own unique styling." The front and rear of each car looks completely different.

    In the second paragraph, you state, "Forty years later, some people insist the old Dart was a muscle car; but precious few were made with the muscle engines (340 and 360, with a scattering of big-blocks), and nearly all were economy cars." Generally speaking, yes, but if the report specifically compares the '74 through '76 models, the 340 was no longer available after the '73 models.

    Under interior, about velour seats: "It ended up in the Valiant Signet when, after the fuel crisis, people wanted smaller cars that looked like their older, more “premium” cars inside." I'm not at home to consult my sources, but I think that the Signet name was retired by then. The high-dollar Valiant was called Brougham.

    In the first sentence about the Valiant dashboard, rathr should be rather.

    Under pricing, you list a 1975 Dart as costing $13,746. You were probably thinking in 2013 dollars, which you state just before the next comparison. You might consider moving that note to just before the earlier comparison. Given those amounts, car price inflation has more than quadrupled since the mid-1970s, which was a very inflationary time itself.

    You mentioned that the earlier cars had bias-ply tires. Radials were an option, though how commonly equipped, I don't know.
     
  5. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    I was looking at the wrong page, I think. Hold on... now I see and that's some dreadful writing. Fixing WITH THANKS.
     
    #285 Dave Z, Aug 25, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2017
  6. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    Scrounge, you were right on all points — and 2 Dodge Garage was right, that IS a minivan image. I think. In any case, I replaced it.
     
  7. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    Much improved. Under safety, perhaps you could add that the national speed limit was 55 mph starting in early 1974.

    Also, I missed this, toward the end just before the last paragraph: "Originally, both cars aimed at European design and priorities (the Dart changed quite a bit from first two second generations) and arguably handled better than their domestic competitors." Two should be to. Unless you're trying to convey something else? The first generation, in name, was from the '60 to '62 model years.
     
  8. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    Good point. “From the first to the second generations of the compact series,” I guess. Did some rewrites there.

    Don’t know what I’d do without you... well, I guess I’d be inaccurate.
     
  9. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    "narrow body" to "wide body" works.

    "In theory, the national speed limit was 55 mph in 1974, which limited damage somewhat" -- here, I'd put "in theory" after "which" or "somewhat", since the national speed limit was a fact. Not sure that I'd say the '70s Darts were aimed at European design, though certain portions of Europe might have qualified. They were essentially extensions of the late '60s styles. The first Valiant, like the Falcon, Comet and Corvair, was more of a response to the sales successes of the Rambler models.

    You have a lot of helpers here.
     
  10. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    I'll look at wording of the 55 mph sentence. It was the 60s Darts that were European influenced - even with a four cylinder originally planned. Maybe approval was based on success of the Rambler, but the idea was to make something European in feel (possibly because they were trying to revive their Eurosales which had fallen from “good” to “negligible.”)
     
  11. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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  12. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    Ok, I see it somewhat in the bug eyed '63 Darts. McNamara at Ford was planning a 4-banger car, but he joined the government before he could see it through. The first Tempests had 4-bangers; so did the base Nova, but most buyers preferred sixes or V8s. With the slant 6 as reliable and economical as it was, I don't think a 4 would have caught on in the Dart.
     
  13. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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  14. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    Well, I'm glad that the 4 failed; the resulting slant 6 was one of the industry's best engines. In fact, it often makes 10-best lists:

    The 10 greatest engines of all time (at http://driving.ca/chevrolet/auto-news/entertainment/the-10-greatest-engines-of-all-time )

    Top 10 Engines - OnAllCylinders (at http://www.onallcylinders.com/tag/top-10-engines/ )

    Dodge Mirada page:

    Dodge Mirada: neglected sporty coupe of the 1980s (at https://www.allpar.com/model/mirada.html )

    End of the first paragraph: "(whose basic were shared with the 1980 Chrysler Cordoba and, after one year, the 1981-83 Imperial.)" Should probably be basics.

    Just before the carburetor chart: "The sporty looks were belied by relatively mild powertrains and a suspension was tuned for ride, rather than handling." Either the suspension, or a suspension that was tuned.

    The chart under Mirada Specifications has a * after the 1980 Diplomat width, but nothing beneath to indicate what the * means.
     
  15. Walt Kienzle

    Walt Kienzle Member

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    There is an error in the spelling of the designer's name who styled the interior of the Javelin. Oleg Cassini (not Oleg Cassinni) was the designer.
     
  16. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    First Plymouth page:

    Illustrated Plymouth & DeSoto Buyer's Guide: Plymouth 1928-1929 (at https://www.allpar.com/old/buyers-guide/plymouth-1928.html )

    Second paragraph: "James J. Storrow, an ALCO director and former President of General Motors, who urged Chrysler to visit Detroit, where General Motor’s huge Buick plant was struggling." Buick's factory had been in Flint since 1904.

    Third paragraph: "By 1912, Chrysler was president of the Buick Division. General Motors’ flamboyant founder, William C. Durant, entered the picture and Chrysler’s life began a series of “hills and valleys.” By 1915, Chrysler was being paid half a million dollars a year in cash and stock—but Durant’s reckless business style clashed steadily with Chrysler’s no-nonsense approach until Chrysler decided he’d had enough and walked out." Durant didn't buy GM back until 1915, and made himself its president in 1916. Perhaps "entered the picture in 1915" would help. So would "walked out in 1919". And change "By 1915" to "by then".
     
  17. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    Interesting. I'll have to coordinate with Jim Benjaminson.

    Scrounge - fixed Mirada, thanks. Improve both sections.
    Walt, thanks, fixed, pick a prize if you want one.

    Will look at the 1928 page... okay, I think I’ve got everything.
     
    #297 Dave Z, Aug 28, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2017
  18. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    Yes, improved. Too bad the Mirada didn't sell, it's a nice-looking car.
     
  19. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    Agreed. I've never driven one but it does look good.
     
  20. 1999 White C5 Coupe

    1999 White C5 Coupe Well-Known Member

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