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The NEW Ongoing Allpar Blunder Recovery System

Discussion in 'Mopar News' started by Dave Z, Mar 26, 2017.

  1. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    Fred Zeder article:

    Fred Zeder: a biography (at https://www.allpar.com/corporate/bios/fred-zeder.html )

    First line of the second paragraph: Mach should be March.

    The sixth paragraph repeats part of the fifth paragraph. You might want to combine them and remove the redundancy. Same with the seventh paragraph about Studebaker's financial troubles.

    "Had the economy allowed it, Durant — the force behind Chevrolet — may well have mounted yet another successful challenge to the conglomerate he had created and been expelled from." During the Roaring Twenties, the economy allowed it. Lack of sales to justify Durant's constant expansions and acquisitions was the main problem. The main makes during their heyday were Star, Durant, Rugby, Flint and Locomobile, along with Mason Trucks. In 1927, makes started to drop, and by 1929, before the stock market crash, the only makes left were Durant and Rugby.
     
  2. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    I'll take a look. Durant’s other issue was his failings as a manager/leader. Great at buying, not so good at running.
     
  3. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    The book I have about Durant is titled The Deal Maker, which described him well. He was good at making carriages, but at GM, he seemed more interested in buying suppliers than contracting with them. Perhaps his major accomplishment during his second stint at GM was purchasing Hyatt Roller Bearing, which brought Alfred Sloan into the corporation.

    Road Runner page:

    The legendary Plymouth Road Runner and Dodge Super Bee (at https://www.allpar.com/model/roadrunner.html )

    First sentence: "The 1968 Plymouth Roadrunner was a first in American automotive history: a high-power, but budget-priced muscle car, with light weight and strong engines." The same can be said of the 1964 GTO.

    Burton Bouwkamp quote: "in the Pontiac carline, you had to buy a Pontiac Leman’s [should be Le Mans'] level of trim/features/price before you could get a GTO." But the bottom lines were similar. According to Nada, base prices for 1964 were $2421 for Pontiac Tempest, $2599 for the Le Mans, and $2799 for the GTO. For 1968, base prices were $2538 for the Belvedere, $2688 for the Satellite and $3034 for the Road Runner. Next paragraph: "Before the Roadrunner, performance models were derivatives of the premium model." Again, many GM performance options were in the mid-range; the Chevelle SS396, for example, and the Cutlass 442.

    First paragraph after the 1971 heading: "Gaven Govier, as quoted in the Standard Catalog of Chrysler," should be Galen. Also, was he actually quoted in the Standard Catalog? It's at home and I'm not, so I can't currently consult it. Toward the end of the 1971 section: "John Belbas pointed out that the 1968 Road Runner had the 383 or Hemi; the 1969 and 1970 Road Runner had the 383, Hemi, or 440 triple-twin-barrel." The statement's placement should be before the 1970 section.

    Under 1972: "Also in 1972, electronic ignition, a Chrysler invention, became standard," -- does this mean during the model year, or calendar year? And across the board, or for certain engines? According to this, the electronic ignition was introduced for the 1971 340 with a manual transmission, became standard for cars sold in California with V8 engines and optional elsewhere during the '72 model year, and standard across the board starting with the '73 models:

    http://www.numeralkod.com/cross/archivemanuals/chrysler/electronic ignition system tmj-106p.pdf
     
  4. GLHS60

    GLHS60 Well-Known Member

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    Even the term Muscle Car wasn't invented until well into the 1970's

    They were all known as SUPERCARS until the exotics took over that term.

    Thanks
    Randy

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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  6. 1999 White C5 Coupe

    1999 White C5 Coupe Well-Known Member

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  7. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    1939 Dodge Luxury Liner page:

    1939 Dodge Luxury Liner: a new car for the end of the Depression (at https://www.allpar.com/old/luxury-liner.html )

    Gear Shift Control heading, second paragraph, second sentence starts, "To shirt gears" -- "shirt" should be shift. Later in the sentence, "the only difference being that the sifting lever" -- "sifting" should be shifting.

    Clutch heading, second paragraph, first sentence: "Clutch ventilation has also been improved by increasing the air exhaust outlets are in the clutch housing." This would read better without "are".

    Editor's note at the end: "A 201 cubic inch engine on export models produced 82 horsepower from 201 cubic inches." 201 is mentioned twice. Suggest eliminating the last prepositional phrase. I question whether the export models should even be mentioned, since they were essentially Plymouths.

    While reading the page, it became unresponsive. After x-ing out and linking again, it bogged down. Don't know if this is the page itself, or some advertising that takes too much memory. Perhaps you could give preference to advertising that isn't so resource-intensive.

    A nice-looking car.
     
  8. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    1958 Dodge page:

    Dodge Coronet and Custom Royal (at https://www.allpar.com/old/coronet.html )

    Fourth paragraph after Custom Royal heading: "It came standard with a two barrel WW series downdraft carburetor, which was okay but it needed a bit more throat, so it also came out with the four barrel version which complemented the engine greatly." This reads like the 4-bbl carb replaced the 2-bbl some time during the model year, rather than an option.

    Four paragraphs later: "They bolted to the rear bumper had had little louvres on them, if you have a set or know were a set is, get them and keep them as they are as rare an honest politician." Two problems: "had had" -- the first had should probably be and; "were" should be where.

    The article mentions 3 models. Another, the Regal Lancer, a 2-door hardtop with a base 350 engine, was introduced during the model year, though I don't know if it should be considered a separate model, or a Custom Royal with more standard features.

    One of the pictures shows a '55 Red Ram engine; the last picture is of a 1956 Super Red Ram engine. If they're the same as one of the '58 engines, the captions should say so, but if not, you might want to keep the page entirely about 1958 cars and their engines. The same goes for the webmaster note toward the end, which describes a '56 model.
     
  9. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    Volare page:

    Creating and Naming the Plymouth Volare: the development story (at https://www.allpar.com/cars/plymouth/naming-the-volare.php )

    "During product development, the in-house code names for the “F” Body vehicles were Aspen (Dodge) and Vail (Plymouth). We had to call them something, so we called them Aspen and Vale;" Spelled "Vail" and "Vale". Given that Aspen and Vail are both ski resorts in Colorado, I'd guess that the first spelling is correct.

    The Aspen/Volare were decent cars. The first-year models were recalled so much because they lacked proper testing and initial quality control.
     
  10. Dave Z

    Dave Z It's me, Dave
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    Thank you!!

    I know it has been a long time since I’ve been here and done anything, but I’ve made all these changes (and more!)

    I very much appreciate your help in fixing all these bugs!
     
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  11. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    Still "sifting" on the Luxury Liner page.

    I don't see Galen Govier quoted, or even mentioned, in the Standard Catalog of Chrysler. My copy is a first edition, third printing (1997).
     
  12. CNT900

    Level 2 Supporter

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  13. Scrounge

    Scrounge Well-Known Member

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    K car page:

    Plymouth Reliant, Dodge Aries, and Chrysler LeBaron: the K-cars (at https://www.allpar.com/eek/k/k.html )

    A redundancy rather than an error: about halfway down, one paragraph starts, "Numerous improvements to the sound insulation and feel were made in 1983. Then, for 1984, the Reliant and Aries were given a minor facelift, though retaining their squarish looks." The next paragraph starts, "1984, again, brought a more upscale appearance". The following paragraph is for 1985 models.

    Also not an error: in addition to "issues with the valve seals and an overly complex, expensive Mikuni carburetor," the 2.6 Mitsubishi engine also had a balance shaft chain, which made timing chain replacement more complicated.

    This was the car that saved Mopar, but I rarely see one on the roads these days.
     

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