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Torque to yield Ball Joints?

Discussion in 'New Challenger, 300, Magnum, Charger' started by moparroy, Apr 4, 2020.

  1. moparroy

    moparroy Active Member

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    I was doing some work on my 2010 Charger this week and noted that the torque specs for the front suspension ball joints indicate all 3 are torque to yield (TTY) type fasteners. Torque spec is 50 ft lbs + 90 degrees for the LCA BJ and the tension strut BJ and 35+90 for the upper. My understanding is that TTY fasteners are generally one time use and must be replaced - typically for head bolts. The manual says use a new nut (they are a self locking type with a plastic / nylon insert at the top) but it does not say anything about needing to replace the BJ itself. I am also curious if anyone understands why Chrysler would chose a TTY type fastener for a BJ. Are aftermarket TTY also? The tie rod ends are a similar diameter (at least on the Moog replacements I have installed) but are not TTY - straight 63 ft lb torque. I would understand the benefit of defined clamping force for the likes of a head bolt or a main or rod bearing bolt - but I fail to see how this is required for a tapered ball joint stud. Curious on others thoughts / experience with these. Do you religiously use TTY torques? with new nuts?
    Thanks
     
  2. sickboy

    sickboy Well-Known Member

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    I had bought a hub and could not find a replacement tty spindle nut for the life of me. Asked the dealers service dept.

    they said they just reuse them
     
  3. ImperialCrown

    ImperialCrown Moderator
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    The LX/LC cars still used a lot of Daimler-Benz designs and influence in 2010. Chrysler (or Fiat) probably wouldn't have done it this way.
    You want threaded components and fasteners to have some elasticity. Otherwise, if the steel is too brittle, it can break. Aluminum arms that the fasteners hold together are comparatively soft metals.
    In the old days of castle nuts and cotter pins, we would move the nut to the next tighter 'window' to slip the cotter pin into the hole.
    Ideally, the self-locking nuts are 'single-use', but can be used over if a new fastener isn't provided with the new part package. The nylon insert in the nut should hold a 2nd time.
     
  4. moparroy

    moparroy Active Member

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    Thanks - yes I have seen and heard from mechanics that replacement nuts are sometimes easier called for than found.
    On softer aluminum suspension parts I could see TTY would make some sense - but I don't think anything on those parts on my Charger is aluminum.
    I did reuse the nuts - I thought about putting some blue thread lock on them but did not this time. Will keep an eye on them. If they show any signs of loosening they'll get a shot of thread lock.
    I did measure the removing / loosening torque with a beam torque wrench for all 3 nuts. Then the first one I put back I started to TTY it but the torque started to well exceed the removing torque. Sure the TTY torque could be more than the breaking torque - but reusing the nut may also change the 50/35 ft lb reference point. The loosening torque was a little more than the spec on the same size thread on the tie rod so I used that - 70 ft lbs. I will keep an eye on them whenever I change the tires seasonally. Semi retired now so I don't drive that car as much anymore.
    I have also reused prevailing torque nuts before without issue on my Intrepid and on the Daytona.
     

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