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Why 2 inches is important..........(no jokes)

Discussion in 'Vans' started by voiceofstl, Mar 25, 2017.

  1. voiceofstl

    voiceofstl Well-Known Member

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    This goes for al the tradional vans from the big 3, though the Dodge B van is no longer made.
    These vans were made to be work vans/trucks.
    48 inchs is a standard material size for plywood and dry wall and many other things.
    The vertical size of the doors are all around 46 inches.
    Knowing they were makeing work vehiecles why didn;t the make the door sizes that are work friendly
    This also goes for the Dakato truck, 46 between the wheel wells.
    Comments......
     
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  2. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

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    How wide is the door opening? Normally, I would lay plywood flat, not vertically.

    There is at least 48" between the wheel wells on my Ram. I don't think the Dakota was expected to be used as a work truck or hauling plywood.

    But I do see your point.

    I don't think the engineers expected minivan owners to haul plywood with their minivans, but they did. I think the '00 T&C Ltd we had, had just enough space between the wheel wells to lay a 48" plywood sheet flat (seats removed of course).
     
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  3. valiant67

    valiant67 Rich Corinthian Leather
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    Dakota didn't need the wider bed. That was for the D150. Though Dakota had slots for braces (like cut from 2x4s) to load 48" wide materials "floating" above the wheel wells.
     
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  4. DC-93

    DC-93 Active Member

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    I had an old '75 Dodge Van and hauled all kinds of stuff in it, like 440 engines with 727 transmissions. Loaded it up from the back - 2 swinging doors. Or even the side, depending on the load!

    BTW - V. of St. L, do you stay up at night thinking of wacky threads to start??? o_O
     
  5. MPE426HEMI

    MPE426HEMI Well-Known Member

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    Any minivan I have owned, I could easily fit 4x8 sheets of plywood or drywall inside.
     
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  6. voiceofstl

    voiceofstl Well-Known Member

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    What wacky threads??? I am referring to full size work vans thatwere design as work vehicals when the verticak door opening size is 46.5 or 47.5 and they know 48 is a standard work size, they should had made it right.
    And that goes for the Dakato too for between the wheel wells.
     
  7. ptschett

    ptschett Well-Known Member

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    On the B-vans I suspect there was a goal to keep the 1/2-ton version low enough to fit through a 7'-nominal height garage door. I'd be surprised if they didn't have more than 48" width in the rear door opening or between the wheelhouses.

    On the Dakota one of the tradeoffs of it being smaller than a Ram was that the width between the wheelhouses was ~45" vs. the Ram's 51", but there were the provisions to make a 2nd tier load floor if needed to haul 48" material flat, and there was already a general perception that the last Dakota was "too big" / "just as big as a Ram" (though my '05 Dakota was 10" less long, 6" narrower and about 10" lower than the Ram that'll be replacing it.)
     
  8. voiceofstl

    voiceofstl Well-Known Member

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    All the big vans from the big 3 was more then 48 wide at the door opening but none were 48 tall. I just find it very strange thry couldn't add a inch or 2,,,damn in some dodges I think they just missed a by a 1/2 inch. seeing they were built for work.
    If they were concerned about the overall hight they could saves a inch or 2 in the suspension or floor.
    As far as the dakato with a little tweaking on the axle and the bed itself they couled have done it. Even with that limiation I found the Dakato a very usefull work truck.
     
  9. ohcdoug

    ohcdoug Active Member

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    As a matter of fact the 4x8 sheet of plywood WAS a design parameter for the second gen vans.It fits relatively comfortably without the seats and with the front seats in any regular position. there is a "load to here" line on the bottom plastic piece covering the rear hatch entry.
    For the 3rd gen its still possible to fit a sheet in but good luck fitting more than a couple. In my 98 GC I can and have done 10 pieces of 4x8, the 2010...2 is what fits easily, and that only with the front seats moved up from their regular position.
    As well the 98 will and has many times taken 10 foot pieces of pipe , conduit and anything else that long up the middle , under seats and without crashing into the lower part of the dash. The 2010 fits ten feet , carefully with the seats down and the center removed, carefully as it rubs on the dash and almost hits the rear hatch, also i have done three 4" 10 foot pipes in the 98 GC , and only 1 in the 2010.
    I get the different design parameters but really?? To change some thing that simple for the sake of a couple of inches that are filled with plastic anyway??
    Its a step back by people who design things, not done by people who use them...but the 2010 GC is full of such things so I won't rant. Just buy something else next time.
     
  10. JTE

    JTE Well-Known Member

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    Two things;

    The Dakota was designed to complete with the Ranger and S 10, neither were built for sheet stock or were they given a means to build a riser. If you want a truck with a Ram box, that requires ram axles and a ram frame, what's the point.

    The 2" of plastic are the result of mandated impact standards.
     
    GasAxe likes this.

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