Hello, Allpar Forums member or visitor! If you were a member, you would not see this ad!

Register or log in at the top right of the page...

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Why are you here?

Discussion in 'Rumors and Speculation' started by james.mooney., Jan 20, 2015.

  1. james.mooney.

    james.mooney. The Poster Formerly Known As "Bethlumboy"

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2007
    Messages:
    2,594
    Likes:
    1,380
    For those who may have missed it, bumonox submitted the follow post in the Jeep Wrangler thread in Mopar News and Rumors:

    So why are you here at allpar?

    What first ignited a passion for all things Chrysler, or Fiat, Jeep, Alfa Romeo, Ram, Lancia, Plymouth, Maserati, Imperial, Ferrari, Mopar, SRT, or Abarth?

    And what keeps that passion burning?
     
    MoparDanno likes this.
  2. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2000
    Messages:
    12,143
    Likes:
    1,647
    I fell in love with Chrysler back when it was still "Chrysler Corporation. We bought a '86 LeBaron GTS which I absolutely loved to drive. Wife loved it to. From then on, with the exception of one vehicle, it was all Chrysler, Dodge or Plymouth products. The only Chrysler I owned before that was a '65 Dart I had in high school.

    What keeps the passion going for me is I have always had a soft heart for the underdog (Chrysler) and absolutely despise Honyota's. Would love to see Chrysler surpass the "other" guys not only in sales numbers, but in quality as well.

    Though I am not a Jeeper (never owned a Jeep) I absolutely understand where Norm and other Jeepers are coming from. I don't think FCA management has a clue what "Jeep" is. "It's a Jeep thing and you wouldn't understand" really does mean something and those outside looking in won't really understand until they own a real Jeep.
     
    jerseyjoe, Mopartial and MoparNorm like this.
  3. pug-man

    pug-man Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2004
    Messages:
    905
    Likes:
    34
    My grandfather had a Dart way back, my dad had an 87 Dakota which was passed on to me. The 94 Ram got me more interested and it went from there.
    Agree Doug D!
     
    jerseyjoe likes this.
  4. dana44

    Ad-Free Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2002
    Messages:
    19,326
    Likes:
    1,238
    I got into Mopars during the late 70s, when I was learning all about cars and engines. In the early 70s, when gas went from 32cents a gallon to 42 cents a gallon, my father (GRHS), got me started in the classics (Cadillacs from the 50s and before, my Nash, '35 Olds, and a lot of Fords, some Chevys). It was another 6-8 years that I was identified by my mentor (Bob S knows him), that introduced me to Mopars, a guy a few years older than me that was BBC and SBC, a machinist for TRW for the Voyager missions and engine builder at Pomona International raceway (as a late teenager before graduating high school). His first job to me was to read the 1977 SEA manuals so I could at least understand what he was talking about. 1977-1980, between working 114 hours a week, he would visit me to talk stuff during slow times, then later, I reverted to a 94 hour workweek, he started teaching me things, an observer and investigator overall, improvement and why things were better than others, a routine story was the roughly two dozen hotrods in town (and the occasional build), which was, there are there Mopars in town that have sold three or four times (69 RR, 72 Challenger, and 2 Darts), and each and every time they come in, the same response, the carb needs rebuilt, or the mufflers are bad, whereas the other Ford, Chevy, Olds, Pontiac, the result was, well, still needs rebuilt, front end is bad, brakes are bad, trans is still slipping, bad valve guides, but never a Mopar (carbs were the biggie), and then the determination as to what types of metals were used to make them. How many times in five years can a 318 be raced and then sold and not need rebuilt? One of his greatest stories was a 318 (it was out of my original 68 Charger) 265,000 miles. Pulled for a 383 out of a GTX (I know, not original engine), was ringed and bearinged, no machine work, put in a 68 Mustang, bracket raced in a 14.20 bracket for two years, daily driven 70 miles one way, so another 60,ooo miles put on it, and finally retired because the guy found a 1970 351 Cleveland engine to install in it. My buddy, as Bob S will attest, is 6'9', and Mopars were built for big people, never found a Mopar I didn't fit in until 2007. To me, that is when Mopars ceased to exist. I had about 2 decades I kind of lost (between work and the Navy), so the late 70s and most of the 80s, not real good years for any car company come to think of it, but I did have a new respect for the Shelby Charger 2.2 Turbo. October 1986. GF and I spent a couple weeks in Seattle. She with her sister, me with my buddy (for a couple days), while I installed a 6-pac on the Charger (361 B block), something I always wanted and could now afford, and on our way down to San Diego where I was stationed, I ran into, heading south, a silver 86 Shelby Charger 2.2 turbo. We bantered in and out of traffic a few miles, then I got him cut off by chance, not something I intended to do, it just happened. As he then passed us, I told my GF, if you see a little puff of black smoke, he wants to race (you only pass each other so many times before the challenge arrives, right?), and she says, well, never been above 100mph in a car, to which she said, oops, theres the black smoke. I moved over behind him, and instead of thinking about how fast we were going, I was more impressed with the way the car, a FWD car, had sucked down to the ground, how it went over the little humps and bumps, and flat out moved. About 45 seconds of this, campers flashing by on the right, keeping about three carlengths behind him (for safety on my part), something flew off his car and went over the top of me! I pulled over with him, backed up (his 4WDB was better than my 4WDrB), to which I talked to him a bit. Couple guys going to reserve training in SD, knew the ship, so we compared speeds and rpm. 85mph speedometers don't give good info, by matching tire size and rpm, we figured 138mph. What flew off his car? Little blades on his European wipers, and why he stopped (not worried about the wiper blade thing), the braw was ripping on the front of the car and he wanted to remove it for safety (and it was expensive). Not too bad for a 1968 Charger with 540,000 miles and on its third used motor and original front and rear end. Tough? Almost as good as the piledriven 1977 Dodge 4door truck that had gotten 4 radiators, five grilles, all the glass from the junkyards in a 40 mile radius, and finally pile driven one too many times that it would cost money to replace the glass this time, that once the engine and tranny was pulled, it turned out hauling a chord and a half of firewood each time something needed replaced, the frame was still within 1/8th an inch corner to corner. Tough? Works for me.
     
    Scatch and PCRMike like this.
  5. hmk123

    Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2008
    Messages:
    2,180
    Likes:
    1,278
    Since the nineties I have been a fan of Chrysler designed sedans. Out here in import frenzy California driving Chryslers means driving a pretty unique car. Became a real fan in 2000 when I bought a 300M. And even more so when the LX cars appeared. Also their underdog status and the fact that you get a lot of car for the money drew me to them. And Allpar is just the best source for all things Mopar. Really appreciate all the historic information on here.

    Bought the Journey a few days after congress grilled the Big 3 CEOs in support of Chrysler and the local dealer. I believe if possible you should support your domestic industry and workforce.

    And is there anything cooler than a 71 HEMI 'Cuda?!
     
    #5 hmk123, Jan 21, 2015
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2015
    PCRMike likes this.
  6. AC TC

    AC TC Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2004
    Messages:
    2,520
    Likes:
    347
    Top fuel hemi. ( 1977 i realized who the hemi came from i was 13 years old. )
     
    con383 likes this.
  7. floridaman2013

    floridaman2013 Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2013
    Messages:
    1,113
    Likes:
    320
    ;)At 16, my first car was a '52 Plymouth Cambridge convertible given to me by a gas station that just wanted it out of their yard. It need a battery and had a burnt valve. Put a 12 volt battery in until I gota 6 volt, fixed a rubber brake line, and drove the heck out of it untils ending to the crusher. This is what I learned to drive a stick shift on! After driving other cheap vehicles, I realized that MOPARS seemed to either have more Torque or HP than most and were just plain fun to drive. I also loved AMC as we had quite a few, was really mad when they went out of business. When I got out of the Army the firs time, 1979, I started working as a Technician for a multi brand dealer: Chrysler-Plymouth, Dodge, AMC, Jeep, and later Renault. I liked a lot of different branded vehicles I 've owned but really have a soft spot for MOPARS and VWs.
     
    superduckie5000 likes this.
  8. valiant67

    valiant67 Rich Corinthian Leather
    Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2003
    Messages:
    31,677
    Likes:
    10,951
    I am here because of one car. That would be a 1977 Chrysler Cordoba. I still remember the day the neighbors brought that car home. i would have considered myself a GM person, probably looking for a Monte Carlo or Cutlass as my first car before then.

    Four years later I found a used cousin of that car (1976 Dodge Charger SE), bought it and loved it. Then it came time to buy a new car a few years later and I was greatly disappointed that the only choice I had were FWD K cars and a rather dowdy 4 door RWD sedan. I came very close to buying a new Mustang but decided maybe I'd like a truck. After a few test drives, the Ranger and S-10 were quickly ruled out. The Jeep Comanche lost out on interior space to the Dodge Dakota, though the Comanche had better performance. So I ended up with a new 1987 Dakota followed by three more new Dodge trucks because there simply was not a new Chrysler car that appealed to me. While I made due with used Chrysler cars (lots of RWD ones and some FWD ones) my interest peaked again when Chrysler returned to RWD cars in 2005 (not counting "dream" cars like Viper and Prowler). In 2005 I was not in a position to buy a new car, so I had to wait. But it sure was nice in 2009 when I finally was able to purchase a late-model RWD used Chrysler car, something I had not been able to do since 1981.

    Since then as my financial situation improved, I upgraded that used 300 to a new Challenger and then another new Challenger. In many ways the new Challenger reminds me a lot more of the Cordoba/Charger of old than that horribly cramped 1987 Mustang I almost bought new. Oddly as Chrysler's entries into the car arena improved for my needs, their entries into the truck market declined (I don't want a Ram, it's too big for my needs). So if Chrysler abandons RWD again, and the truck lineup does not offer a smaller traditional pickup like the Dakota was, I'll be buying nothing but used cars again. I'm here to voice my opinion that RWD is as important to many car buyers as capability is to many Jeep buyers - yes there is the Fiat for commuting but it's more of an appliance. It does not evoke the passion my 1999 Dakota R/t or 2015 Challenger does in my soul. I've sat and watched the corporation I love switch from FWD to RWD once. Yes, the FWD K cars sold well, saved Chrysler (then nearly killed it again) but they also permanently ended a lot of people's associations with Chrysler. It took years of wandering in the FWD wilderness before the regained the spirit of the RWD American sedan. We are on the verge of watching that cycle repeat with the 300 (appears likely) and possibly the Charger (just a rumour for now). I will voice my strong opinions on what I like. I put my money where my mouth is. I don't just speculate on Chrysler's future. When they make a car I like, I buy it!
     
    patricklynch and PCRMike like this.
  9. John Wood

    John Wood Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2002
    Messages:
    11,078
    Likes:
    153
    My Dad was a big Chrysler fan. I remember his 49 Plymouth Coupe with the 6 volt battery and the silver push buttom on the dash to operate the starter; his 55 Windsor with the dashboard lever for the automatic gear shift; and the car I learned to drive on, a 65 Newport. Chrysler always had great engines. For just a few years I went GM and finally got so disguested with poor quality, I just went back to Chrysler and followed in my Dad's footsteps.

    Nowadays, it is just a hobby to keep these vehicles running as long as possible. I like the Allpar board mainly for the technical articles, stories, and to see how people work through their problems. I still enjoy providing and receiving technical information and I love to solve problems (it is my nature). Ocassionally I'll take on a big repair project for one of my family vehicles, but I have had to cut back on some things due to the complexity of modern vehicles and the fact that I'm getting up there in age which has resulted in a little reduction on the enthusiasium. :). It has and (continues to be) interesting to follow the evolution the automobile. Allpar and other resources keeps us up to speed in that regard.
     
    rapidtrans likes this.
  10. FreeLantz

    FreeLantz Well-Known Jeeper
    Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2003
    Messages:
    2,647
    Likes:
    882
    I'm a third generation Mopar man. My grandfather worked for the Mopar division in the 1940's and '50's in Missouri, and then for dealerships in Texas later in his life. My dad and his brother grew up in the '50's, driving the latest Plymouths, Dodges, and DeSotos that my grandfather would bring home as demonstrators. During the '60's my dad owned quite a few interesting Mopars, including a '65 300L and a '67 Satellite that I heard about a lot growing up. By the '80's when I was a kid, he was driving Gran Fury's and Fifth Avenues. Only when Chrysler dropped the RWD M-body in '89, did he switch to Lincoln out of sheer disgust with Mopar no longer offered a RWD sedan. Personally I was always a truck guy until recently. My first Dodge truck was a '93 Dakota, regular cab with a 318. It was a fast little truck, even faster by the time my brother and I were done with it, and I would have to say my personal love affair with Mopar began behind the wheel of that Dakota. Since then I've owned '96, '99, '02, '05, and '07 Dodge pickups, a Magnum R/T, a Patriot, and two Wranglers. Currently I'm down to just one, a 2013 JKU Rubicon 10th Anniversary.

    I was a freelance automotive writer for many years and published newsletters beginning in the mid-90's, so I was there to see Chrysler's return to relevance and leadership during that time. I was at the press introductions for the Ram Pickup, Neon, Cloud Cars, Viper GTS, Prowler, Durango, and many others. I sat with Bob Lutz at a couple of the press conferences, where he would ask for my opinion when I was still very young, and appear to genuinely care what I had to say. I also met Bob Eaton once in Detroit, and found him to be the polar opposite of Lutz, a man who would literally turn and walk away from people who were in mid-sentence introducing themselves to him. When Eaton sold Chrysler to the Germans, I was one of the most outspoken critics. I've posted some of my correspondence with Lutz here before. It's quite eery now to read his feeble attempt to defend the merger, knowing how he really felt about it.

    Nonetheless I remained loyal to Mopar during the Daimler years, and worked in a CJD dealership for most of them. There were a lot of ups and downs: The excitement surrounding the LX's and the return of the Challenger, and the sheer disgust with half-baked efforts like the '07 Sebring, Compass, and Caliber; sales success of the Hemi truck and later, the infamous "sales bank" fiasco of forcing inventory on the dealership that we didn't want or need. I left there in 2008 as the economy began to tank, and just under a year later that dealer lost his franchise in the bankruptcy, despite being the largest Mopar parts retailer in the SW region. Many of my friends lost their jobs. Some now work in other CJDR stores, but many went to work for competitors, and some got out of the business entirely.

    I am still active on Allpar after all these years because I still enjoy the discussions, although lately I've noticed many of them turn negative almost immediately. I'm cautiously optimistic about where the traditional Chrysler brands are headed, but share the concerns of many over the dilution of Jeep, attempt to minimize Dodge into a niche player, elimination of the Caravan, etc. We are seeing undeniable successes with the Cherokee, 200, Ram trucks, and Grand Cherokee. Existing Jeep products not even updated in several years are still setting sales records. There's a lot of good news on a daily basis. Maybe some of us are so used to things being bad, that it's hard to believe. But Chrysler is in a better position for growth today than at any time since 1999. As long as the traditional Chrysler brands exist and continue to build competitive products that are true to the brand DNA, I will be loyal to them no matter who owns or runs the corporation. If they become simply a rebadged Fiat, then they will risk losing me.
     
    MoparNorm likes this.
  11. CherokeeVision

    CherokeeVision Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2004
    Messages:
    5,330
    Likes:
    1,952
    Mainly because of Jeep.
    Years before I was old enough to drive I would have my Mom take me to the local Jeep dealer so I could get the latest Jeep Book.
    Bought my first Cherokee in 1989 and that dealer had great service.
    Because of that service department it made sense to see what Chrysler had when it came time to replace the 84 T-Bird my wife had.
    She was looking at the Intrepid but we went for the Eagle Vision. Bought that in 1994. Then I bought my second (current) Cherokee in 2001.

    Haven't bought many vehicles because we keep them for 12 to 14 years. Keep them in good shape and get all we can out of them.

    Other influences?
    I had an Uncle that bought 18 new Chrysler's in 24 years. Every year he would trade in for a newer model
    Finally slowed down in the 90s. Even received a thank you letter from Lee Iacocca.

    Sister had a 1986 LeBaron GTS. I still think that was one of the best designs. Hatchback without looking like a hatchback.
     
    Doug D likes this.
  12. Doug D

    Doug D Virginia Gentleman

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2000
    Messages:
    12,143
    Likes:
    1,647
    Amen! Sporty looking as well.
     
  13. rapidtrans

    rapidtrans Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2005
    Messages:
    1,316
    Likes:
    593
    Dad worked in body design and styling at Highland Park for 28 yrs. Was there when the "company car" program started in '62. His loaded '62 Plymouth wagon lease payment was $29/month.
    He turned in his last company car in 2010. Chrysler was good to him & mom is set up fine with his retiree pension and healthcare bennies.
    I grew up through the Petty years, got my drivers license in'69 and enjoyed many great mopars.
    I've worked at Chrysler also though it became quite a different co.
    FCA is yet another step-away from the co. I knew.

    For the same reason I like "Collectible Automobile Magazine" I'm more interested in the nostalgic mopar articles.
    I still own a few mopars but my driving tastes are kinda moving out of the Charger/300 class. They're a good $ value but lacking in refinement.
     
  14. Citation84

    Citation84 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2003
    Messages:
    757
    Likes:
    384
    My 63 Valiant Signet 2 door [which I've owned for 35 years] sparked my interest in Chrysler and it's past and future. The history and back story of the corporation. The 63 Dart 270 wagon my parents bought new. Their 78 Fury. The first gen minivan and 05 Sebring my brother and SIL failed to kill. [They are to cars what serial killers are to humans]. The whole DCX debacle. The Sebring/Avenger because they are so hated I want one for myself. Pretending my bike was a 57 Desoto when I was 10 years old.
     
    rapidtrans and Mopartial like this.
  15. caine440

    caine440 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2003
    Messages:
    122
    Likes:
    34
    Ronnie Sox, Dick Landy, The Ramchargers to name a few. The racing success I read about in magazines and viewed during the rare coverage Wide World of Sports offered.

    First car was a 1974 Plymouth Satellite 318, the next was a 1970 440+6 Roadrunner. And couple of turbo Shelby’s along the way to my 2006 Charger R/T that I have now. Which will be replaced this year with a SRT Challenger.

    I have be loyal through the dark sad times of the late 70s and the seemingly never-ending front wheel drive line up, to the wonderful rebirth of the Challenger.

    The loss of Plymouth, the rise and fall of the Eagle division and the Jeep invasion have all been part of being a Mopar Guy.

    I remember talking with a good friend back in 1980 saying we would never see another 13 second factory ¼ mile time. When the quickest cars of the time were running 16s.

    Now is the best of times for those that enjoy performance cars the way I do.

    Though I would love to have my Roadrunner back in the garage parked next to a SRT Challenger.
     
    PCRMike likes this.
  16. FreeLantz

    FreeLantz Well-Known Jeeper
    Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2003
    Messages:
    2,647
    Likes:
    882
    Maybe a moderator could pin this thread? It's been really enjoyable reading the responses.
     
    Mopartial, wtxiceman and Doug D like this.
  17. BASONE88

    Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2012
    Messages:
    1,281
    Likes:
    769
    Good question, great thread!

    I am an automotive enthusiast from birth..but these brands are my sentimental favorites, which from the media's perspective(historically), haven't garnered much love. I found this place as I was seeking..somewhere that was pro Mopar/Chrysler/Dodge/Plymouth.

    I grew up in Dodges(literally). Have traveled countless 1,000's of miles in Dodge vans from a baby up to late teens, early twenties. LOL(that's embarassing to admit)! Bikes, boats, cars..all towed behind the vans as we camped and recreated out of the back of them. My pop loved vans..Dodge vans. Also, have spent countless nights sleeping in them.

    Longest road trip - was in a '77 Tradsman 400 Maxi-van to the East Coast; New Jersey, Maryland, south through the Carolina's to Florida - then from Alachua, we towed a large sailboat back to Utah.

    I didn't care for any Chrysler products growing up. And although my first car was a Plymouth, I spent years trying to run away from the brand. Tried Ford, Subaru, Nissan, Toyota..and, in spite of that, as I got older, there was just an irresistable, soft-spot, developing for Chrysler and Dodge and Plymouth!

    Thirty years ago, I wondered, why and how does this company keep hanging around and not get swallowed up by Ford, GM, Toyota, Honda or whatever. Read Iaccoca's biography. Observed AMC becoming part of the "big circus," and honestly, that is when things really started getting interesting at Chryco(renaissance of the '90's). But "Chrysler" is a great story from 1903, 1904 - if you consider Overland the beginning. But innovation is the answer to "why."

    Not only has this been a great hang out to share interest in my favorite brands, it has also been an honor and a real education. Thank you all!
     
  18. MoparDanno

    Level III Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2010
    Messages:
    4,259
    Likes:
    4,609
    Book time. :)

    I was born in December of 1970. When my parents found out I was coming along, a 1970 383 Pistol Grip Road Runner was bought brand new as the "Family car". Mom had a 1967 Sunbeam Alpine ( Another Mopar! ) at the time, and that was her toy, so it was dad's call on what was gotten next. My first ride in a car was in that Road Runner.

    I grew up in the Road Runner, and other subsequent Mopars. I remember riding between the front seats ( buckets, no console ) and having to reach up to grab that shifter handle and watch my dads feet to determine what gear to put it in for him as he was driving. This obviously was before they got super serious about child seats etc. I think I was 4 or 5 at most. I remember getting to sit in dads lap and drive on some back roads a couple of times.

    My Grandparents had a 1968 Coronet 440 4dr. 383 auto, manual steering/brakes car. I remember watching grandma wrestle that thing around when I was a kid. My Uncle had a 1976 Dodge D150 that had a camper that my grandparents would borrow, and I would go camping with my grandparents. My Uncle also had a 1969 Chrysler 300 2 door. He was the 2nd owner. My grandparents were the 4th owners, and I ended up being the 6th owner. My uncle also had had a 65 Coronet 2dr 383 car prior to my being around, and later a 77 Cordoba.

    Back to my parents cars, the Alpine got sold, and a 1973 New Yorker Brougham replaced it. After that, I belive was the 81 318 Lebaron. Then the Road Runner got parked ( 183k miles ) and dad picked up a used 66 Dart 2 door with a 170 slant 6 in it, and the Lebaron got traded in on a Dynasty.

    By the time my parents got the Dynasty ( 91 ) I was well on my way to having a corral of my own Mopars. I remember in high school drawing pictures of all my favorite Mopars. Cutting them out of magazines and taping them to my school book covers etc etc. I got given my first car, the aforementioned 69 Chrysler 300 2 dr. 440 car, and that thing used to eat transmissions about once every 2 years. It had had at least 6 put in it before I got it, and when I got it it needed #7. So I limped it home very carefully, and started my first major car project. Doing a 727 swap on a C body. lol . I learned a lot, and my dad wouldn't show me anything. I had to figure it all out from the service manual. That actually helped me very much later in my car career. Lets see, Chrysler 300 in 86, then I snagged a 72 318 3 speed on the floor Gold Duster in 88 or so for $600, and built my first motor ( a mild 340 ) for it, and converted it to a 4 speed.. I did A LOT of street racing in that car.

    In 90 or 91 I found a red 68 Barracuda fastback 318 car that I just "HAD" to have. $800 later it came home with me. Brown shag carpets and all. Luckily the original carpet was still mostly intact under the shag, so out that stuff came. This car also had the SUPER rare red plastic wheelwell liners that were a 68 only option. I cant remember what package they were part of, but they were neat and special. I ended up building a pretty radical solid cam 340 for that, backed by a 4000 convertered 998 and a 4.30 geared 8 3/4. Locally the car became somewhat ledgendary. I had people telling me stories about that car 15 years after the fact, not realizing that I was the owner of the car! Talk about an ego boost. lol.

    My work had ended up dovetailing with my car obsession as well. I started in the auto parts business at 16 as a driver, and was a counterman within 6 months. Other than a brief 3 year stint in a completely different industry, I have spent the past 26 years as a parts guy. The last 15 or so at a CDJR dealership.

    While I owned the Cuda, I ended up starting to collect them. A bad habit admittedly, but I had space to work, and so I started picking up parts cars and tearing them apart and selling the parts off or what have you. I think I went through at least 15 67-68 Barracuda fastbacks that I parted. If I knew then what I know now eh? LOL.

    Let see, at that point I picked up my 79 Lil Red Express from a co-worker who had a 1970 44o 6 pak Sublime Challenger. I cleaned that up, and ended up rebuilding the engine and trans in that. That became my tow rig for my Cuda when I would go to the track. The Duster was gone by thing point ( graveyard in the sky...I was hard on that poor Duster ). I did a lot of buying and swapping in this era, I cant even keep track of all of the Mopars I went through. I remember being given an Aspen /6 4dr that I swapped for a 71 318 Duster, that I then swapped for a non running 68 Cuda fastback. Such was the nature of my wheeling and dealing. LOL.

    Next was the 89 Shelby Daytona. Then I had a 91 Mitsu GT3000VR4 for about a month, then I got my OWN 1970 Road Runner. Then the Daytona got sold, and I used that money as the down payment on my first brand new vehicle: the Dakota R/T in my sig picture. That truck is the longest that I have owned any one vehicle... 16 years and counting. That Dakota R/T brought my wife into my life ( She had one too and thats how we met. She still has hers too) and opened many doors for me.

    Since 1998 I have owned and sold the following:

    2001 black Stratus R/T 2 dr MT
    1999 black Dakota R/T RC
    1998 platinum Jeep 5.9 Grand Cherokee
    2005 black Crossfire SRT6 Roadster
    1998 maroonRam 1500 2wd 5.9
    2002 white Stratus R/T 2dr MT
    2006 black Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT8
    2010 b5 blue SRT8 Challenger SRT8 MT

    And currently I still have:
    1998 purple Dakota R/T Club Cab
    1998 blue Dakota R/T Reg Cab
    1999 purple Dakota R/T Reg Cab
    2005 yellow Ram Rumble Bee RC 4x4

    So yeah, I think you know the reason I am here now :)

    Its not just a disease, its an obsession.
     
    PCRMike and pug-man like this.
  19. PCRMike

    PCRMike Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2010
    Messages:
    1,865
    Likes:
    705
    I came home from the hospital in my dad's 1975 Cordoba when I was born. We had several other cars growing up, after Michigan rust got the 'doba, but dad had a 1978 Dodge D100 Club Cab LWB that had a 318 auto which he promptly added 2-1/2" duals and baffle-knocked-out glasspacks. Loud, and I loved it. He would romp on it and wind it out (no cats, old style Carter BBD). It wasn't fast, but sounded badd. We moved to Hawaii and left it sitting in Michigan for four years....

    In Hawaii I came of age and bought a pair of Pontiacs. A 1987 Fiero GT (J-U-N-K) that only had 48K miles. everything tended to break. Traded it hurriedly for a 1984 Trans Am. Sold it to move back stateside, and we moved to Arkansas. We drove dad's Bonneville to Michigan and got the truck. A fuel hose, a hot battery, fresh gas, and gentle coaxing of sticky valves, and we had it home. I drove it for years after, though the sitting took it's toll. The vent windows leaked water into the floors and rotted them out. I met my wife while driving the "Hoopty". I used to take her on dates with her slid over by me on the bench, afraid to put her feet on the "Flintstone Brakes" passenger floorboard remnants. The thing refused to die. I literally finally walked outside and shot it with a .38 revolver so I could justify hauling it off.

    Bought many, many FWD Mopars after that, driving them all over 100K miles a year in my work, peaking at 4 business vans, two pickups and a family car at once. I finally bought my first new car (obviously a Dodge) in 2012, after the good changes were made to Journey, and traded in our 280K mile 1994 T&C. Second is our 2014 Durango Citadel, and shortly after, my 2013 Dart Limited. Now my kids own Mopars (except for one Honda) and when they graduate college in three years, I have agreed to help them get new cars, but they MUST be Mopars. One wants a Chally, one a Charger and one a Jeep. Yes, a Wrangler, as it is the only one that is defined by a one word name.

    So many friends have owned other brands and I have watched as they had breakdowns that they couldn't fix. Only one time in 23 years of adulthood have I ever taken my car to a mechanic for something I couldn't fix, and that was my only blown A604. The A413 and A423 (in my turbos) I did myself. Got so good at head gaskets and timing belts I could do either in 45 minutes to an hour on the side of the road. I carried both spare! Nobody else has made things as service friendly, logical in layout, and easily repaired in comparison as Mopar. That is why I am here. To cheer on my favorite brands. To show support and voice opinion. To show off my new toys when I get them and cheer for you guys when you do. I learn a lot too from the likes of one Mr. Bob Sheaves, and others.
     
  20. koussevitzky

    koussevitzky Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2015
    Messages:
    115
    Likes:
    134
    -The first car I remember was my dad's Valiant, then his Dart.
    -Then I remember as a kid going inside a Phantom (LeBaron) and being amazed with how futuristic it looked.
    -An old Spirit RT was my transportation during my teen years...
    -Worked in a CDJR dealer, and trying to educate myself, started to read this site, and got hooked up. It's really a great community. Real knowledge, no bullpoopies.

    And most important of all:

    Chrysler was the underdog, the small(ish) guy maybe, but with brains and balls. It has managed to do amazing things despite it's limitations. Chrysler is Rocky.
     
    jerseyjoe, Joe O. and wtxiceman like this.

Share This Page

Loading...