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The amazing dual-PCM Demon

by Patrick Rall on

The final “teaser” video of the 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon went live on IfYouKnowYouKnow.com and this week, we learn about some of the gadget in the Demon Trunk – including an powertrain control module (PCM) tuned to run on 100 octane race fuel and a new button panel for the interior with a High Octane Fuel button. We also learn that the Demon will have dual fuel pumps, larger fuel injectors and higher pressure fuel rails.

 

We have known for a few weeks now that the 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon will come with a “Demon Crate”, including skinny front wheels and the tools needed to change the wheels at the track. The early information on the Demon Crate also mentioned that it will come with some Direct Connection Parts and today, we learn what some of those parts are.

The 2018 Demon will be the first ever production car designed to run on 100 octane racing fuel and this is possible thanks to the specially tuned Direct Connection Performance Parts Powertrain Control Module. The Demon comes with a PCM tuned to make monster power on “normal” premium unleaded fuel (91 octane), but the Demon Crate PCM will remap the engine parameters to make even more power on 100 octane unleaded racing fuel.

This high performance PCM works in conjunction with a new switch panel for the center stack of the Demon (shown above), adding a unique High Octane button with an indicator light. When you have the high performance PCM, and a tank full of 100 octane racing gas (or mostly 100 octane gas), pushing the High Octane button on the dash engages the racing gas tune – unlocking the full potential of the Demon’s supercharged Hemi.

Best of all, since the Demon has all of the knock sensor technology of every modern engine, the PCM can automatically adjust for lower octane fuel. Let’s say that your tank is full of 91 octane and you hit the High Octane button, the system can detect the low octane and the driver will be notified on the information screen that there is insufficient octane for the race gas button. Also, say that you top the tank off with 100 octane fuel, but you have too much 91 in the tank to maintain the needed octane levels – the system will also detect that and make the needed adjustments to protect the engine from the damaging effects of too much boost and too little octane.

Finally, regardless of what octane is pumping through the Demon’s fuel system, it will be arriving to the engine with greater flow than that of the Hellcat Challenger. The new track-ready muscle car will use two fuel pumps to maintain the needed flow, working with larger fuel injectors and a higher pressure fuel rail to feed this hungry beast.

Unfortunately, we still don’t get any power estimates, but today’s press release promises that “drag racers will see big changes in elapsed time (ET) with the high-octane fuel.”

This is the final teaser ahead of next week’s debut of the 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon in New York City, so it seems as though we will head into the grand introduction without` knowing the power numbers or any of the track times – but based on what we have learned over the last 12 weeks, we can expect that the new Demon will be a remarkable machine.

Of course, Allpar will be in attendance for the Demon debut in New York City and you can be sure to find the most comprehensive coverage of the newest supercharged Dodge Challenger right here – with updates during the course of the debut event on Tuesday night.

 

Patrick Rall was raised a Mopar boy, spending years racing a Dodge Mirada while working his way through college. After spending a few years post-college in the tax accounting field, Patrick made the jump to the world of journalism and his work has been published in magazines and websites around the world.


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