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    1. · Registered
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      Depends on whether you consider price and reliability. Fiat engines in those days were unadulterated crap. I like engines that last 200,000 miles and can be driven all the time without having to be tuned once a week by a specialist. Electronic ignition came really late to Europe, didn't it?
      I am sorry to say that you are absolutely ill informed or uneducated about Fiat engines. The Twin cam is a Legend that has no American or even any European matches in terms of design, robustness, cost of production and maintenance and competition heritage.
      You might want to read up before you come to illinfomed conclusions. Bialbero: All the cars powered by the legendary Twin Cam: 9781527279445: Amazon.com: Books

      I think I will take an expert’s verdict over your personal preferences!
       
    2. · Banned
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      LMAO 🤣
      You conveniently omitted the one decade age gap. And also conveniently forgot to read the chassis design and weight distribution I mentioned about. You can’t compare an Econobox FWD nose heavy sedan based 2 door Coupe to exotic perfectly weight balanced sports car. I’ll repeat race horse vs Mule on steroids to give you a better picture.

      T3 174hp still inferior. The 1982 GIulietta 116 Turbodelta (a small 4 door sedan btw) made 170hp from just 2 liters with the 4 cylinder all alloy Alfa Twin cam that originated……wait for it in the 1950s! By 1992 the domestic market 2.0 V6 Turbo in the 164 was making 210hp!

      Duster??? Are you serious? That’s like comparing a wild elephant on steroids with Cheetahs. Won’t work.
      Your Duster with 43hp per liter will get Dusted with 1970 2.0 Alfa V8 in the Montreal with a specific output of 77hp/L! However to truly appreciate Alfa Romeos engineering prowess would be to look at the 1967 2.0 V8 in the Tipo 33 Stradale which had a specific output of 115hp/L. I doubt that even Ferrari were capable of coming up with anything to match that back then.

      Forget it. Don’t even try to compare the two brands. They are galaxies apart.
      I am sorry to say that you are absolutely ill informed or uneducated about Fiat engines. The Twin cam is a Legend that has no American or even any European matches in terms of design, robustness, cost of production and maintenance and competition heritage.
      You might want to read up before you come to illinfomed conclusions. Bialbero: All the cars powered by the legendary Twin Cam: 9781527279445: Amazon.com: Books

      I think I will take an expert’s verdict over your personal preferences!
      Alfa conveniently forgot to update its lineup in the '80s, the Alfetta variants ran from '72-'87, it is an apples to apples comparison, '83-'87 cars.

      Of 500K Alfettas 22,636 were 6 or 8 cylinders, 4% of the total. Add in 400 4 cylinder turbo homologation specials and it is clear that 95% of Alfettas were low powered economy cars (81-128 HP). They were made over 15 years averaging 33K a year.

      Of 586K Daytona/Lasers 167K were turbos and 24K were V6, 28% and 4% of the total. 68% of the total Daytona/Laser production was low powered economy cars (93-100 HP). They were made over 10 years averaging 58K a year.



      The Fiat twin cam engine was basically an economy car engine. Only a few versions reached 140 HP, mostly not for road use.
      131AR.0001995ccm140HP/215HP
      ?1995ccm205HP (037 stradale)
      ?2110ccm325HP (competition engine)

      The Alfa twin cam engine was also rarely used with forced induction, mostly in homologation specials. 50 GTAs, 400 GTV turbodeltas, just enough to take racing, not regular production engines.
      The 116 turbodelta was only offered in '84-'85, It was 168 HP, 209 lb-ft and only 361 were made. It had carburetors, you expected us to be impressed with such a backward, limited production engine?

      You had the year wrong for the 116 turbodelta, or rather you were saying when preproduction version was shown at the Paris auto show. The preproduction Daytona was shown in Motor Trend in 1982 as well.

      Who cares about 18 hand made Italian cars from '67'-'68? Barely anyone in the US, that is for certain. "Total Montreal production was around 3,900. None of them were sold in Montréal since Alfa did not develop a North American version to meet the emission control requirements which applied in the United States and Canada."
      1970 Plymouth Duster 0-60 mph 5.7 Quarter mile 14.1
      1973 Alfa Romeo Montreal 0-60 mph 8.0 Quarter mile 16.6



      In 1991 the Chrysler turbo III had 224 HP, thanks for verifying that the Alfas, Lancias and Fiats of the '90s and '00s were copying the Dodges and Chryslers of the '80s and early '90s.

      Alfa sold over 4.5 million cars from 1954 to 2010, and over 95% were small economy cars.

       
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