Allpar Forums banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is this the right forum for this antique? I didn't see anything else it fit in. I am considering purchasing a 1929 Phaeton that is in pretty good shape for a car this old. I have tried to look up some info based on the serial number RS335E but haven't had much luck learning anything. I did find that the RS is 46 so does that mean that it is the 46335 unit built? And what does the D mean? Here is a short video of the car
 

·
Super Moderator
1966 Crown Coupe, 2016 200 S AWD, 1962 Lark Daytona V8.
Joined
·
22,977 Posts
Welcome to Allpar. I've been a member of both the WPC and Studebaker Drivers clubs. Great fellowship and a shared desire to help.
Since the internet, there is lots more resources and information for the hobby out there.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I was reading the story about the search for the first Plymouth ever made. I spent a lot of my working years assembling various parts of fighter planes. The first few jets are usually destroyed doing testing. They are stress tested in a fixture that measures strain on every part, frozen to very low temperatures, heated and heat soaked to simulate desert service blasted with high pressure water, shook for hours and about any other test they can think of. When they are done they are not useable and are usually scrapped. I wonder if those early cars were even sold or were tested to death?
 

·
Registered
1979 Lincoln Town Car, 1987 Chevrolet Silverado, 1990 Chrysler Imperial
Joined
·
787 Posts
I was reading the story about the search for the first Plymouth ever made. I spent a lot of my working years assembling various parts of fighter planes. The first few jets are usually destroyed doing testing. They are stress tested in a fixture that measures strain on every part, frozen to very low temperatures, heated and heat soaked to simulate desert service blasted with high pressure water, shook for hours and about any other test they can think of. When they are done they are not useable and are usually scrapped. I wonder if those early cars were even sold or were tested to death?
I would venture a guess and probably say no. Did you purchase the car?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I would venture a guess and probably say no. Did you purchase the car?
Not yet but we haven't decided against it. She told me back in June she was going to sell it and the Model A but hasn't actively tried to sell either. She did price the Plymouth to me and said she would like to sell it to someone local. Right now she wants to drive it in the Christmas parade Dec. 10 with her close friend who is also a widow and some grandkids. That is how I got involved with it in the first place. I volunteered to try to get it ready. The last time it had been ran was in the parade last year. Being a very recent widow with a lot of things to deal with has kept her a bit overwhelmed. We may well reach a deal but I don't think it will be until after the parade. I would love to have the Model A but a fair price for it is more than I want to spend. Its a very nice street rod with a small block chevy and even has a matching trailer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,393 Posts
Wow, that's pretty cool, and I can see why she wants to drive it in a parade, that screams that it wants to be seen and appreciated :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Wow, that's pretty cool, and I can see why she wants to drive it in a parade, that screams that it wants to be seen and appreciated :cool:
Funny thing is she has never driven it but my wife has. I have no doubt she can, she drove a 68 Cougar XR-7 with a 4 speed in high school. Her husband was just the one that always drove it. He drove it in last years parade but suddenly passed away in Feb.
 

·
Registered
1979 Lincoln Town Car, 1987 Chevrolet Silverado, 1990 Chrysler Imperial
Joined
·
787 Posts
Not yet but we haven't decided against it. She told me back in June she was going to sell it and the Model A but hasn't actively tried to sell either. She did price the Plymouth to me and said she would like to sell it to someone local. Right now she wants to drive it in the Christmas parade Dec. 10 with her close friend who is also a widow and some grandkids. That is how I got involved with it in the first place. I volunteered to try to get it ready. The last time it had been ran was in the parade last year. Being a very recent widow with a lot of things to deal with has kept her a bit overwhelmed. We may well reach a deal but I don't think it will be until after the parade. I would love to have the Model A but a fair price for it is more than I want to spend. Its a very nice street rod with a small block chevy and even has a matching trailer.
I would buy it. It's in nice and seems to be well kept. My great uncle has a 1928 Chrysler Model 52 in wonderful shape that he drives sometimes. I never drove in it but he says you defiantly don't want to go past a certain speed because it gets rough and I can defiantly see that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Excellent! So it begins!
About the parade... We had a 750 W inverter clipped to the battery and when they put the lights on the car it worked fine for a couple of hours non stop. When we took the picture you see above it didn't want to stay on. I attributed it to the battery being a little low and brought it back to a full charge. I tried the lights several times and they worked fine. Fast Forward to the parade. We were staged two hours before it started. We clicked the inverter on a couple of times for pictures and it worked fine. The parade started and boom it shut off within seconds. You could push the button and it would light the car for a few seconds and go off. My wife drove the whole route with a finger on the button turning it back on. She says her finger is raw! No one realized it wasn't supposed to go off and on and it was a success.

The moral of this story is modern technology let us down but 1929 technology worked without a hitch.
 

·
Registered
1979 Lincoln Town Car, 1987 Chevrolet Silverado, 1990 Chrysler Imperial
Joined
·
787 Posts
About the parade... We had a 750 W converter clipped to the battery and when they put the lights on the car it worked fine for a couple of hours non stop. When we took the picture you see above it didn't want to stay on. I attributed it to the battery being a little low and brought it back to a full charge. I tried the lights several times and they worked fine. Fast Forward to the parade. We were staged two hours before it started. We clicked the inverter on a couple of times for pictures and it worked fine. The parade started and boom it shut off within seconds. You could push the button and it would light the car for a few seconds and go off. My wife drove the whole route with a finger on the button turning it back on. She says her finger is raw! No one realized it wasn't supposed to go off and on and it was a success.

The moral of this story is modern technology let us down but 1929 technology worked without a hitch.
That is quite something. Yes modern technology defiantly has its faults and I have been in many situations of going back to older technology to get the job done. That's why I like a nice mix of old and new.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Well we committed to buying the 29 Plymouth today. The title is in her late husbands name and at her lawyers. I told her when its straightened out we will buy it. I am not in a big hurry and its only a verbal agreement but I don't expect anything to change.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
We have agreed to buy it and I think it will go through but the title is at her lawyers who is taking care of all the details after her husband passed away about a year ago. I have no idea what the timeframe is for it to get settled.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top