Allpar Forums banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
1993 Dodge caravan, 1949 Dodge truck, 1991 swb chevrolet truck
Joined
·
272 Posts
Things to remember when looking at points .... Here is a photo of typical points for a 318, not yours but similar.
You can see the white plastic arm .... is called the "rub block"

Gas Auto part Metal Jewellery Fashion accessory

You can see the white plastic arm that rides on the distributor shaft with a cam on the top. .... This is a late 50's Mopar dual point distributor, I doubt you have the same but is possible.
So when the high point of the cam comes around, the rub block is on the highest point, that is the point gap & where you set the points.

A point I'm trying to make is the quality of new products available. The cam needs a light coating of some white grease. A new set of points will come with a small supply of it.
The rub block with no grease can fail in as little as 3k miles. The smaller it gets the less the points open .... You need 17gap & as the plastic wears you have less & less of a gap.
Soon they will not work at all with the modern cheap plastic worn away ..... The grease on that cam is very important.

Automotive tire Rim Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Automotive wheel system


We all know to file the surface of the points flat and clean them .... not going to cover that. ...... Just pointing out the NEED to grease that cam on a regular basis.

The next pointer is the distributor shaft. It is riding on bushings in the body of the distributor. There will be up & down play in that shaft, If you have any side to side play your bushings are worn out. ..... Any side to side movement will change the point gap, thus changing the dwell, thus changing the timing. If you can grab the shaft & get any movement side to side ... you need to pull the distributor & rebuild it. Not a big deal & possibly can do it in your home garage.

The other issue is the quality of condensers available. If your current condenser is working fine .... replace it & treat the old one like gold, in a package in your glove box if you need it in the future.
It is nice to have known working parts with you as you move around.

Point systems are not difficult to deal with, Just helps to know what you are looking at & where to look. ..... Do not forget the wiring inside the distributor
 

·
Registered
1993 Dodge caravan, 1949 Dodge truck, 1991 swb chevrolet truck
Joined
·
272 Posts
You may have oil cups on the distributor body and front/rear generator bearings.
You are 100% correct ..... My post I just want to pay attention to some things others forget.
I know up to 1952 they use the exact same oil cups on the back of the speedometer.
I do not want to scare the lad off thinking it is more maintenance involved when it is pretty simple.

Back in the days when we had steam engines running the rail road or saw mills. We had oilers. ..... The man would walk around and add oil to the glass oil canisters as the engine ran.

I think some engines had as many as 15 or 20 oilers on them, the man kept the engine greased & oiled as it ran.

We are talking way back to the 1920's that they still used steam engines with oilers.

I'm only suggesting that @ImperialCrown is correct on those oil cups. The felt actually collects oil & releases it as needed. .... These modern cups are all over the car .... Just not a big deal.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top