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has anyone seen a 1960 Dodge Police car never seen one evan in pics i just seen fords and chevs
The California Highway Patrol ran that particular model. If you can find a copy: Ed Sanow's book on the 1956-78 Chrysler, Dodge and Plymouth police cars has a whole chapter devoted to the 1960 Mopar squads. :)
 
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Its not the greatest pic, but its proof of 60 Dodge police cars...this one is a 60 Dodge Dart used by the NYPD. Its marked as belonging to the 22 PCT, which is now the Central Park PCT. Dodge also offer the larger Polara as a police car, that's the model that the CHP used. There was very little visual difference between the cars, but the wheelbases were about 3 to 4 inches different, with the Polara being longer at 122". The LA Sheriff also used the 60 Dart.

 

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Interesting that police departments chose the brand-new 1960 tech (unibody).
Can someone say TorqueFlite vs. the Chevy Powerglide or the Fordomatic? ;)
 

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The LA Sheriff was set back on his backside with the performance of the 1960 Dodge DART, the 118 inch wheelbase model. It easily outshone all comers, as did the 1960 Plymouth, which also was tested. At that time, the LA Police, the LA Sheriff, and the California Highway Patrol did their own evaluations. The Plymouth was equipped with the 383 V-8 and the Dart with the 361 V-8. Both 4 barrels and dual exhausts. The choice was outstandingly clear, as the MoPars bested all comers. Pontiac, Mercury, Oldsmobile, Buick, Chevrolet, Ford. Particularly in braking performance, there was no equal. The Sheriff settled on the smaller V-8, in the Dart (22 cubic inch difference) as it was part of the Dodge Dart Package, and not an option as was the Hi-Po 383 in the Plymouth. Thus saving a few bucks on each car, and believing (not so) that it would be more economical. Deputies, after been in mostly Fords, and for only one year of Chevrolet (1958) were estactic about the Dart, it's outstanding handling, and fantastic braking.

However, interestingly, the LA PD choose the 1960 Plymouth, yet, they equipped it somewhat oddly. They ordered the standard 318 2 barrel, single exhaust, and POWER flyte (2 speed automatic) As well, they also required that the transmission be able to function on the 10W-30 weight engine oil..........without modification! Of course, the requirement was met. They ordered 330 of them. In 1961, the LA Sheriff got Chevrolet Biscaynes with Powerglide and 348 V-8s. LA PD ordered 331 Dodge Darts equipped just like the 1960 Plymouths. 318 2 barrel, single exhaust and Powerflyte transmissions. Engine oil requirement remained the same.

In 1962, the entire LA community of law enforcement ordered Plymouths equipped with the 361 V-8s, duals, 4 V, and TORQUEflyte transmissions. (3 speeds) The LA PD requirment for the trans to operate with the same grade oil as the engine remained. The Torqueflyte performed without complaint. That marked 10 straight years of Plymouth dominence until the purchase of the 1972 Matadors. AMC ruled for 3 years, however, in 1975, Plymouth again was chosen. LA PD did purchase a certain amount of 1970 Mercury Montego to fulfill the Governor's arm twisting to buy something else once in awhile. However, the PD couched that buy, ordering about 150 Montego and 220 1970 Plymouth Belvederes, a lot of which were surreptiously earmarked as "detective" units. Black and whites?.
 

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DaveAdmin said:
Interesting that police departments chose the brand-new 1960 tech (unibody).
The best is just the best, no matter the chassis, body combination. The 1960 Ford was a dream car design that Henry Ford II wanted, against the advice of his "whiz kids." It was rushed, and really didn't fit the chassis which was NOT redesigned to fit the new body. It was an odd handler, and it's braking performance was always up for fading. Chevrolet had a 348 ci V-8 hooked to a two speed automatic, the Power Glide, which hampered the flexibility of it. It handled well enough, and the brakes were up to task, however, the MoPar's stiff chassis and torsion bar suspension, along with the Grey Rock brakes simply outperformed everything in America at the time.
 

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I was going to add that the torsion bar suspension made the cars handle like sports cars. The larger, heavier 300F and Imperials handled like they were 1000 lbs lighter than they were.
Past reports that the torsion bars were prone to breakage were greatly exaggerated by the haters.
In contrast, GM was having an awful time with their 4-corner coil springs since being introduced in 1958, even on the new 1960 cars.
An owners report by Popular Mechanics gave the 1960 Ford a dismal quality rating.
 

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ImperialCrown said:
I was going to add that the torsion bar suspension made the cars handle like sports cars. The larger, heavier 300F and Imperials handled like they were 1000 lbs lighter than they were.
Past reports that the torsion bars were prone to breakage were greatly exaggerated by the haters.
In contrast, GM was having an awful time with their 4-corner coil springs since being introduced in 1958, even on the new 1960 cars.
An owners report by Popular Mechanics gave the 1960 Ford a dismal quality rating.
As was reported by the Minnesota Highway Patrol about the 1960 Fords they had. They were given the 300 horse 352 4V engine, but stick shift. They were NOT happy with the poor handling qualities exhibited by the 1959 Fords that they had, calling them "quirky" and highly sensitive to cross winds, sometimes changing whole lanes, out of control! The 1960 models were actually worse. They also had 1960 Plymouth Savoy and Dodge Darts with the 361 V-8. They were excellent cars, great handlers and super brakes.

Part of the issue of broken torsion bars that quickly became a sort of urban legend, when in 1958, the bean counters in financing determined that they could save $2.50 on rubber boots that capped the end of the torsion bar, and kept the dirt from entering into the pad, causing it to bind, and break. After a few thousand in warranty claims the boots quickly reappeared. However, the legend, of course, lived way beyond the actuality of itself!
 
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