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That's from a press book—they don't have a summary like that now. They often didn't have one like that then, either...! Interesting that they didn't include the net figures. On some materials from 1971, they did both, which was good prep for the next year.
 

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That's from a press book—they don't have a summary like that now. They often didn't have one like that then, either...! Interesting that they didn't include the net figures. On some materials from 1971, they did both, which was good prep for the next year.
My point was about the number of engine options available. If they did that today it would smoke all the computers and the just in time arrival of parts would crash the system.
 

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My point was about the number of engine options available. If they did that today it would smoke all the computers and the just in time arrival of parts would crash the system.
True enough! Though sometimes it seemed pointless. Why do a 413 and a 426 in the same year? Why a 426 wedge and 440 at once? 350 and 361? 1971 was a pretty rational year for powertrains, admittedly!

Thinking... back then it was ten variations on three families (six, LA, B/RB). Now it's GSE 1.3, GME 2.0 (with/without hybrid), 3.2 and 3.6, 5.7, 6.4, and 6.2S. That's eight variations on four families. Oops, forgot the 2.4 - nine variations on five families! And the Hurricane... eleven variations on six families (GME4 / GME6 as separate families, that's debatable). 'Course most vehicles have just one or two choices. None of this "two slant sixes and three V8s available" stuff, even in trucks and Wranglers. One six, two eights, one diesel in trucks... ha! forgot diesels. 13 variations on eight families! But to your point, any particular car or truck only has up to three options, other than Charger and Challenger, which have five.

But that's temporary. In three years we should have BEV on one side; and on the gasoline side, GSE 1.3, PSA 1.6 (a HUGE leap), GME 2.0, 3.6 (the last of them), Hurricane Six, and maybe 6.4 Truck, and Cummins (maybe with hydrogen version).
 

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Don't forget...in today's world, each engine/transmission combo must be certified for fuel economy and safety (crash tests). This costs the manufacturers more to offer a wide variety of engines in one platform, which is why we see models like the Dart with only 4 cyl engines available (and no 2.4 at launch), or small Jeeps with 2.0/2.4 only, etc. Trucks are more versatile as the different engines don't change the crash data that much, but small cars can make a big difference going from a 4 cyl to a V6 in the way that they crash.

JS
 

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Correct me if I’m wrong, now-a-days, engine choices are bundled in packages, no? Whereas, back then, you picked the Road Runner decor group (if you were ordering a Road Runner) then you picked your engine; 383cid was standard in this case, in 1972 it was the 400cid (same damn thing). But then you had the choice of substituting it with a 440, 340, or 426, without really taking on anything else.

And I believe you could also order a Satellite Sebring with a 4bbl big block (not a 440cid), heavy duty suspension, a 727, and - i’m pretty sure – a 3.55 sure grip. (Essentially, a Road Runner, but more expensive; and therefore would make no sense).

Please correct me if I’m wrong, but I think you’d never be able to do something like that today, because the engine choices are in lockstep with the packages. For example, an engine today would come bundled with gawdawful heated leather seats and some stupid infotainment center type thing.

And BTW, everybody says the big detuned-smog year was in 1972, but that’s not correct. It was 1971! Look at the de-tuned 383!
 
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