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I have recently begun a new project car from a barn find. Unfortunately, information is scarce and wondering if anyone here has additional information.

I have a 1984 Plymouth Horizon Shelby Engine 2.2L High Output- it was an option only in 1984. I haven't confused with the Omni GLH or the Shelby Charger. The VIN matches to the high output Horizon, I also have the original receipt for the vehicle with the high output option. The only production numbers I have been able to find total 84 created.

Does anyone have any additional information regarding this vehicle and its option? I have been only able to find a few references across the internet. Usual places like the 1984 brochure don't reference it.

Thanks in advance!
 

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1966 Crown Coupe, 2016 200 S AWD, 1962 Lark Daytona V8.
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Welcome to Allpar. Is the engine code in the VIN a number 8?
These carbureted 2.2L HOs were noticeably stronger than the regular 2.2L, especially with a stick-shift.
 
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Welcome to Allpar. Is the engine code in the VIN a number 8?
These carbureted 2.2L HOs were noticeably stronger than the regular 2.2L, especially with a stick-shift.
Yes it is. It took me quite some time to figure it out because the Horizon decoder’s don’t have an 8 option, instead I had to use the generic Chrysler decoder for 1984. If I am not mistaken, this should be the 110hp Shelby engine.
 

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Welcome to Allpar. Is the engine code in the VIN a number 8?
These carbureted 2.2L HOs were noticeably stronger than the regular 2.2L, especially with a stick-shift.
As additional information, I am the second owner. The first owner purchased this car with this option. It was not an engine swap.
 

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I agree. If the code is on the VIN, then that is the way it was equipped from the factory.
It was a mild bump with special manifolds, timing sprockets (but the same cam) and carb/PCM calibrations. Oh yes and a chrome valve cover.
I don't know how much information is out there on the internet on its history, but the 1984 Mopar parts catalog and a new vehicles/new features Master Tech issue covered this engine. The sales code of the 2.2L HO was EDJ.
 

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Horizon didn't get a GLH package like the Omni so Plymouth Horizon had the H.O. Engine available.

As mentioned not many were sold and it wasn't widely promoted.

Angelo Taylor, champion drag racer won many, events with his MATCHBOX, 1984 Horizon HO.

There is an Allpar link with a few words by Angelo.

I think after 200 K+ miles the little HO was worn out and he tried a 2.2 T-1 and a 2.5 Tall deck.

Thanks
Randy

 

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From memory the main difference was a higher compression ratio, revised spark and freer flowing exhaust.

Higher compression ratio was achieved by shaving .030" off the block deck.

Decking retards cam timing so a special cam sprocket was used to rephase the cam back to its original ICL.

As mentioned they are recognizable by the chrome valve cover and Engine code.

Along with Shelby Chargers they were often used in Direct Connection and California Special Rampage's

Interesting part of Trans Four history!!

Lucky find!!

Thanks
Randy
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

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The article isn't exactly worded correctly.

The 1983 1/2 Shelby Charger was the first car to get the H.O. Engine.

For 1984 Dodge introduced the Omni GLH with the same Engine.

Plymouth did get to offer the same Engine in regular Horizons but wasn't much interested.

The GLH had the H.O. until 1986 but the Turbo was optional for 1985-1986.

The different H.P. ratings of the H.O. were the result of different rating criteria, not different Engines.

The H.O. had the same cylinder head as the regular 2.2, the 1981-1982 2.2 had larger intake ports.

The large port head (655) had a matching large port intake that was considered less efficient.

For whatever reason Plymouth wasn't as interested in performance or Turbo Engines at the time.

There was a couple of Cuda concepts built but not approved.

Thanks
Randy

http://www.streetmusclemag.com/news/the-story-of-the-only-two-85-plymouth-‘cudas/



 

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From memory the main difference was a higher compression ratio, revised spark and freer flowing exhaust.

Higher compression ratio was achieved by shaving .030" off the block deck.

Decking retards cam timing so a special cam sprocket was used to rephase the cam back to its original ICL.

As mentioned they are recognizable by the chrome valve cover and Engine code.

Along with Shelby Chargers they were often used in Direct Connection and California Special Rampage's

Interesting part of Trans Four history!!

Lucky find!!

Thanks
Randy
I did the dyno development on this engine and the engineer was Beth Borland, the first woman engineer doing performance engine development at Chrysler Engineering.
 

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You always impress me with your memories experiences Fast Eddie!

Thanks
Randy
 

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I know we bought a 1986 Turismo 2.2 and while trying to get the engine sorted (timing belt was fubared) we discovered the engine was the HO model. Unfortunately despite specific instructions to the contrary, my almost son-in-law hauled the short block off for scrap, and left a POS 1984 2.2L NA long block sitting there.
 
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