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Was contemplating Truck 451's earlier post about dealer-installed CD changers and it forced me to recollect my three years selling CPJE and Dodge between 1992 and late 1995 (when I joined the Air Force). It made me think about a lot of the cars I pushed in what was actually a very exciting time for car enthusiasts. My oldest kid has been selling Fords for the past year, and while he's making ridiculous money, the process seems to be a lot less gearhead-centric these days and sans a lot of choice. It seems to me I sold in the final days of some really neat combinations - many cars I wish I had now. While most were factory-available, some combinations were just plain strange. Do you remember any of these?

- Base Caravans and Voyagers with the 2.5L and 5-speed. These were available through 1994, and with the most popular equipment (A/C, cruise/tilt, and sunscreen glass) could be had for about $15K (with rebates and discounts)

- Five-speed Grand Cherokees. I remember selling 1993 and 1994 models. Only came in the base model (ugly side moldings and steel wheels) and in 2WD with the 4.0L straight-six. They could be bought for about $20K. I remember driving them and having the ability to chirp the tires in first and second gears

- Base Spirit and Acclaim with 2.5L and five-speed. Also available into 1994, and was a real bargain for a family car. With air, cruise, and tilt could be yours for $12-$13K

One of my big frustrations with my dealership was the ownership's relationship to the local area. Our dealership was on the blue-collar south side of Milwaukee, known for its hard-working yet frugal people. I often tried to coax the lady in charge of ordering into ordering as many base models as possible, but that was often in vain, ostensibly due to the lack of profit margins in stripped-down cars. Yet every single base-model stick-shift car we ever received was gone in a day or two, and often for full price. Since we were a large dealer with a hefty allocation, we always has out-of-state dealers calling for us to trade them a five-speed car for something run-of-the-mill (like a hunter green Grand Cherokee Laredo). Man, that was irritating (but I understood why).

I also remember a few crazy combos that came in toward the end of model runs, such as:

- A loaded (sans digital dash) Lebaron LE sedan (gussied-up Spirit/Acclaim), complete with the puffy cloth interior and landau top...but with a 2.5L/3-speed auto instead of the 3.0 with ultradrive. Had engine and transmission credits on the Monroney label

- A 1993 Acclaim base in wildberry with the 3.0L...and a five-speed in a little consolette (combo not available in these cars; all sticks were 2.5-only). Sold in about 10 minutes

...and my absolute favorites, which came in 1994 as the P-bodies were being phased out, were two base-base-base Dodge Shadows. One white, one aqua, both with grey cloth, no consoles, and steelies with the plastic center caps. They looked like something the gas company would drive. I still remember looking at the window stickers, and the options were A/C (HAA) for about 700 bucks and the 3.0L V-6 for about 5-600 bucks. The stick was standard. I guess they had a few extra Shadow ES drivetrains on the shelf in those days. It was kind of fun to drive, but the engine's torque really affected the tiny P185-70R14 tires. These both sold really fast as well.

Anyway, just a bit of rambling about what I consider a much more fun time to sell Chrysler products...days which are likely gone for good. Would love to see how many of these rarities exist these days.
 

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I have a friend in Detroit that bought a base 1991 Caravan, no option other than automatic transmission. For over a year it sat on the dealer's lot, as their ads proclaimed Dodge Caravans with automatic from $xxxxx. Finally after the 1992 models had been out a while, he got a really good deal on the van no one wanted that spent over a year on the lot.
 

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Was contemplating Truck 451's earlier post about dealer-installed CD changers and it forced me to recollect my three years selling CPJE and Dodge between 1992 and late 1995 (when I joined the Air Force). It made me think about a lot of the cars I pushed in what was actually a very exciting time for car enthusiasts. My oldest kid has been selling Fords for the past year, and while he's making ridiculous money, the process seems to be a lot less gearhead-centric these days and sans a lot of choice. It seems to me I sold in the final days of some really neat combinations - many cars I wish I had now. While most were factory-available, some combinations were just plain strange. Do you remember any of these?

- Base Caravans and Voyagers with the 2.5L and 5-speed. These were available through 1994, and with the most popular equipment (A/C, cruise/tilt, and sunscreen glass) could be had for about $15K (with rebates and discounts)

- Five-speed Grand Cherokees. I remember selling 1993 and 1994 models. Only came in the base model (ugly side moldings and steel wheels) and in 2WD with the 4.0L straight-six. They could be bought for about $20K. I remember driving them and having the ability to chirp the tires in first and second gears

- Base Spirit and Acclaim with 2.5L and five-speed. Also available into 1994, and was a real bargain for a family car. With air, cruise, and tilt could be yours for $12-$13K

One of my big frustrations with my dealership was the ownership's relationship to the local area. Our dealership was on the blue-collar south side of Milwaukee, known for its hard-working yet frugal people. I often tried to coax the lady in charge of ordering into ordering as many base models as possible, but that was often in vain, ostensibly due to the lack of profit margins in stripped-down cars. Yet every single base-model stick-shift car we ever received was gone in a day or two, and often for full price. Since we were a large dealer with a hefty allocation, we always has out-of-state dealers calling for us to trade them a five-speed car for something run-of-the-mill (like a hunter green Grand Cherokee Laredo). Man, that was irritating (but I understood why).

I also remember a few crazy combos that came in toward the end of model runs, such as:

- A loaded (sans digital dash) Lebaron LE sedan (gussied-up Spirit/Acclaim), complete with the puffy cloth interior and landau top...but with a 2.5L/3-speed auto instead of the 3.0 with ultradrive. Had engine and transmission credits on the Monroney label

- A 1993 Acclaim base in wildberry with the 3.0L...and a five-speed in a little consolette (combo not available in these cars; all sticks were 2.5-only). Sold in about 10 minutes

...and my absolute favorites, which came in 1994 as the P-bodies were being phased out, were two base-base-base Dodge Shadows. One white, one aqua, both with grey cloth, no consoles, and steelies with the plastic center caps. They looked like something the gas company would drive. I still remember looking at the window stickers, and the options were A/C (HAA) for about 700 bucks and the 3.0L V-6 for about 5-600 bucks. The stick was standard. I guess they had a few extra Shadow ES drivetrains on the shelf in those days. It was kind of fun to drive, but the engine's torque really affected the tiny P185-70R14 tires. These both sold really fast as well.

Anyway, just a bit of rambling about what I consider a much more fun time to sell Chrysler products...days which are likely gone for good. Would love to see how many of these rarities exist these days.
Had a young friend at CTC who bought a manual mini-van and that's all he talked about. He absolutely loved that van.
 

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I have a friend in Detroit that bought a base 1991 Caravan, no option other than automatic transmission. For over a year it sat on the dealer's lot, as their ads proclaimed Dodge Caravans with automatic from $xxxxx. Finally after the 1992 models had been out a while, he got a really good deal on the van no one wanted that spent over a year on the lot.
Back in the 1970 at Roseville Chrysler Plymouth in Roseville Michigan they had about 30 Superbirds scattered around their lots..................couldn't get rid of them. They had big stickers on the them with a $3995 price. All 440 automatics with black vinyl roofs in every color available. Through the winter they were all covered with snow but they managed to get rid of them somehow the following year. Who would have thought they would be worth what they are now???

Same thing happened with the Super Coupes years later.
 

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Was contemplating Truck 451's earlier post about dealer-installed CD changers and it forced me to recollect my three years selling CPJE and Dodge between 1992 and late 1995 (when I joined the Air Force). It made me think about a lot of the cars I pushed in what was actually a very exciting time for car enthusiasts. My oldest kid has been selling Fords for the past year, and while he's making ridiculous money, the process seems to be a lot less gearhead-centric these days and sans a lot of choice. It seems to me I sold in the final days of some really neat combinations - many cars I wish I had now. While most were factory-available, some combinations were just plain strange. Do you remember any of these?

- Base Caravans and Voyagers with the 2.5L and 5-speed. These were available through 1994, and with the most popular equipment (A/C, cruise/tilt, and sunscreen glass) could be had for about $15K (with rebates and discounts)

- Five-speed Grand Cherokees. I remember selling 1993 and 1994 models. Only came in the base model (ugly side moldings and steel wheels) and in 2WD with the 4.0L straight-six. They could be bought for about $20K. I remember driving them and having the ability to chirp the tires in first and second gears

- Base Spirit and Acclaim with 2.5L and five-speed. Also available into 1994, and was a real bargain for a family car. With air, cruise, and tilt could be yours for $12-$13K

One of my big frustrations with my dealership was the ownership's relationship to the local area. Our dealership was on the blue-collar south side of Milwaukee, known for its hard-working yet frugal people. I often tried to coax the lady in charge of ordering into ordering as many base models as possible, but that was often in vain, ostensibly due to the lack of profit margins in stripped-down cars. Yet every single base-model stick-shift car we ever received was gone in a day or two, and often for full price. Since we were a large dealer with a hefty allocation, we always has out-of-state dealers calling for us to trade them a five-speed car for something run-of-the-mill (like a hunter green Grand Cherokee Laredo). Man, that was irritating (but I understood why).

I also remember a few crazy combos that came in toward the end of model runs, such as:

- A loaded (sans digital dash) Lebaron LE sedan (gussied-up Spirit/Acclaim), complete with the puffy cloth interior and landau top...but with a 2.5L/3-speed auto instead of the 3.0 with ultradrive. Had engine and transmission credits on the Monroney label

- A 1993 Acclaim base in wildberry with the 3.0L...and a five-speed in a little consolette (combo not available in these cars; all sticks were 2.5-only). Sold in about 10 minutes

...and my absolute favorites, which came in 1994 as the P-bodies were being phased out, were two base-base-base Dodge Shadows. One white, one aqua, both with grey cloth, no consoles, and steelies with the plastic center caps. They looked like something the gas company would drive. I still remember looking at the window stickers, and the options were A/C (HAA) for about 700 bucks and the 3.0L V-6 for about 5-600 bucks. The stick was standard. I guess they had a few extra Shadow ES drivetrains on the shelf in those days. It was kind of fun to drive, but the engine's torque really affected the tiny P185-70R14 tires. These both sold really fast as well.

Anyway, just a bit of rambling about what I consider a much more fun time to sell Chrysler products...days which are likely gone for good. Would love to see how many of these rarities exist these days.
Paid $15,258.85 out the door for this 93 Plymouth Voyager SE. V6 with A/C and AM/FM but no tint. Put 144,000 miles on it ............changed plugs once..........had the original exhaust on it when I gave it to a neighbors kid. and the whole engine was completely original when I got rid of it. What a vehicle. Also, we found the van on a lot on Sunday so I came back to the dealer early Monday morning and bought the van from a lady salesperson. When we came to pick up the van she had a dozen roses for my wife and had installed Chrysler hubcaps instead of the standard ones on the van. She said we were her lucky charm because she sold 3 vehicles that day and wanted to do something special for us.
Automotive parking light Wheel Tire Car Vehicle
 

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- Base Spirit and Acclaim with 2.5L and five-speed. Also available into 1994, and was a real bargain for a family car. With air, cruise, and tilt could be yours for $12-$13K
In 1992, my wife and I bought our first new car - a 1992 Plymouth Acclaim 2.5L/3-speed with AC, front disc brakes, crank windows, PS, and AM/FM/Cassette for $11K. I seem to recall the MSRP was around $14K, but with rebates and other discounts we financed around $11K. It would serve us well logging over 302K miles before the heater core began to leak.

I still like the AA bodies - easy and inexpensive to maintain and decent fuel mileage (for their time).
 
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In 1992, my wife and I bought our first new car - a 1992 Plymouth Acclaim 2.5L/3-speed with AC, front disc brakes, crank windows, PS, and AM/FM/Cassette for $11K. I seem to recall the MSRP was around $14K, but with rebates and other discounts we financed around $11K. It would serve us well logging over 302K miles before the heater core began to leak.

I still like the AA bodies - easy and inexpensive to maintain and decent fuel mileage (for their time).
It's amazing how many people I talk to that crap all over that generation(AA). I think they live in ignorance. That generation is underappreciated.
 

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It's amazing how many people I talk to that crap all over that generation(AA). I think they live in ignorance. That generation is underappreciated.
They weren't perfect by any means, but IMHO they were a rock-solid standard sedan for its time.

The 2.5L had its faults - it could have a head gasket failure (and quite a few did), but it was repairable and if the correct gasket and repair procedure (new head bolts) used, it would quite likely never happen again. The 2.5L did have a tendency to develop valve cover leaks. But otherwise, it was an easily serviced engine with maybe the exception being the O2 sensor (behind the engine and underneath the TBI. A tad bit underpowered, but it had good low-end torque - ran out of breath at higher speeds.

Fuel mileage was decent. Both Acclaims I had averaged 23 mpg combined and around 25-26 mpg highway. With the '90 I managed to get 30 mpg once. A 4-speed would have helped in that regard immensely, but the 2.5L only came with the 3-speed auto or if you were lucky, the 5-speed manual (rare). An even rare option was the 3.0L V6 with a 5-speed, but usually the V6 came with the 4-speed auto (41TE) and sometimes with the 3-speed auto. But the 4-speed (Ultradrive) did have issues which would be mostly resolved with the introduction of ATF+4. The 3-speed could use Dexron, but ATF+ gave it smoother shifts. The 3-speed in my '92 did fail at 190K (worn out clutches) - ended up swapping in a 3-speed (no lock up) from a '86 Le Baron GTS. It was still shifting fine when the heater core began leaking 112K miles later.

In a pinch the AA bodies seated six and had decent trunk space. The cloth seats were reasonably comfortable, and I never felt worn out on long trips. Speaking of long trips, we drove from VA to CO and back (4,000+ miles) with three children, bike rack and car top carrier. Averaged 26.5 mpg for the entire trip - not bad. That was the longest trip we ever took with the '92.

Of course, like many vehicles of that era, it suffered from peeling paint. The '92 was a Champagne Gold and eventually the clearcoat began to peel. The '90 had peeling paint as well and looked horrible, but it was mechanically sound.

I do kind of miss those two cars. They were good, economical vehicles to operate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Paid $15,258.85 out the door for this 93 Plymouth Voyager SE. V6 with A/C and AM/FM but no tint.
I always loved the minis in bright red...that looks awesome. As I recall, that color only came on SWB models.

Is that the burgundy/maroon interior? That's actually another rarity. In those days, depending on body color, you could get a grey, tan, maroon, or even blue interior. Today it seems you might have your choice of light black, dark black, charcoal, or midnight...
 

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I love my '92 Acclaim, 2.5l auto. The valve cover did leak but I was able to find a mopar N/A aluminum valve cover. added the good fel-pro gasket and no leaks now. We don't take her on the highway, she's just our "town car". My 6'3.5" son can actually fit in the back and have ample leg room. Rare for cars now.

I liked the 91 Plymouth Voyager with the 2.5l turbo. I've seen a few that have been made into drag racers.
 
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They weren't perfect by any means, but IMHO they were a rock-solid standard sedan for its time.

The 2.5L had its faults - it could have a head gasket failure (and quite a few did), but it was repairable and if the correct gasket and repair procedure (new head bolts) used, it would quite likely never happen again. The 2.5L did have a tendency to develop valve cover leaks. But otherwise, it was an easily serviced engine with maybe the exception being the O2 sensor (behind the engine and underneath the TBI. A tad bit underpowered, but it had good low-end torque - ran out of breath at higher speeds.

Fuel mileage was decent. Both Acclaims I had averaged 23 mpg combined and around 25-26 mpg highway. With the '90 I managed to get 30 mpg once. A 4-speed would have helped in that regard immensely, but the 2.5L only came with the 3-speed auto or if you were lucky, the 5-speed manual (rare). An even rare option was the 3.0L V6 with a 5-speed, but usually the V6 came with the 4-speed auto (41TE) and sometimes with the 3-speed auto. But the 4-speed (Ultradrive) did have issues which would be mostly resolved with the introduction of ATF+4. The 3-speed could use Dexron, but ATF+ gave it smoother shifts. The 3-speed in my '92 did fail at 190K (worn out clutches) - ended up swapping in a 3-speed (no lock up) from a '86 Le Baron GTS. It was still shifting fine when the heater core began leaking 112K miles later.

In a pinch the AA bodies seated six and had decent trunk space. The cloth seats were reasonably comfortable, and I never felt worn out on long trips. Speaking of long trips, we drove from VA to CO and back (4,000+ miles) with three children, bike rack and car top carrier. Averaged 26.5 mpg for the entire trip - not bad. That was the longest trip we ever took with the '92.

Of course, like many vehicles of that era, it suffered from peeling paint. The '92 was a Champagne Gold and eventually the clearcoat began to peel. The '90 had peeling paint as well and looked horrible, but it was mechanically sound.

I do kind of miss those two cars. They were good, economical vehicles to operate.
Well sound reliable regardless even with those couple of issues. Valve cover gaskets are easy to replace, bit more annoying on the 3.3's though. I always wondered why the paint peeled so bad on the cars from the 90's.
 

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Well sound reliable regardless even with those couple of issues. Valve cover gaskets are easy to replace, bit more annoying on the 3.3's though. I always wondered why the paint peeled so bad on the cars from the 90's.
Paint was reformulated in the 1990s. That is the biggest reason it delaminated (peeled). The clear may peel from the color coat. The color (base) coat may peel from the primer.
 

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I always loved the minis in bright red...that looks awesome. As I recall, that color only came on SWB models.

Is that the burgundy/maroon interior? That's actually another rarity. In those days, depending on body color, you could get a grey, tan, maroon, or even blue interior. Today it seems you might have your choice of light black, dark black, charcoal, or midnight...
Yes it is.
 

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Paint was reformulated in the 1990s. That is the biggest reason it delaminated (peeled). The clear may peel from the color coat. The color (base) coat may peel from the primer.
Yep. My '92 only had the clearcoat delaminating. The '90, however, not only had the clearcoat peeling, but the paint as well. In some spots it was down to bare metal.
 

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I liked the 91 Plymouth Voyager with the 2.5l turbo. I've seen a few that have been made into drag racers.
Motortrends hotrod garage has one that they did a show on recently. Was amazing to see a niche classic like that being loved so publicly.
 

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1990-1993 Ram pickups with gas engines were pretty rare by that time. I once saw a very nice '92 W150 LE short box regular cab with a 318 Magnum. How about a 2.5L Eagle Premier?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
How about a 2.5L Eagle Premier?
Good one. Totally forgot about the Premiers and Monacos. We had a '92 Premier in stock until mid-1993 (6-cyl, though). I don't remember the specifics, but with rebates, dealer cash, and giving away all the holdback we still couldn't get rid of the thing. Made it worse when you could get a base Eagle Vision ESi for under 20K.

I never saw a Premier with the 2.5. That was the AMC "Hurricane 150." Would have been pretty gutless, but that was a very stout engine (in AMC/Jeep applications, anyway).
 

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In 1992, my wife and I bought our first new car - a 1992 Plymouth Acclaim 2.5L/3-speed with AC, front disc brakes, crank windows, PS, and AM/FM/Cassette for $11K. I seem to recall the MSRP was around $14K, but with rebates and other discounts we financed around $11K. It would serve us well logging over 302K miles before the heater core began to leak.

I still like the AA bodies - easy and inexpensive to maintain and decent fuel mileage (for their time).
I'll second that. we had the same car you describe but a 1991. at 170000 everything but the brakes and rear shocks and muffler were orginal. i goofed up and got rid of it when i found a 1993 lebaron sedan (same car but loaded). that car had a few more issues like starter, oil seals on the 3.0 and a radiator but it was a great car too and had over 209000 when we sold it. our 1994 GCaravan was also an excellent vehicle other going thru 3 water pumps on the 3.3 had 170000 on it when traded and was mostly original. would get 30mpg driving empty to work. should have kept it as a beater car. our best car was the 2002 intrepid es. 240000 miles and all original but the struts and brakes and battery (water pump was preventative). radiator started to leak 2 days before i sold it.
 
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