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I recently purchased Willem Weertman's book on Chrysler Engines and as I was perusing, I noticed the following diagram of the TIII engine when something caught my attention:



It appears there is a butterfly valve in the intake port on the head. Is this something that made it to the production engine? I see no mention of it in my '92 FWD service manual. Is that, or was that supposed to have been an actively tuned intake manifold (i.e., closing off one intake port per cylinder at low RPM for high swirl, opening it at higher RPM.
 

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I recently purchased Willem Weertman's book on Chrysler Engines and as I was perusing, I noticed the following diagram of the TIII engine when something caught my attention:



It appears there is a butterfly valve in the intake port on the head. Is this something that made it to the production engine? I see no mention of it in my '92 FWD service manual. Is that, or was that supposed to have been an actively tuned intake manifold (i.e., closing off one intake port per cylinder at low RPM for high swirl, opening it at higher RPM.
What strikes me more is that there is no turbo shown and the exhaust manifold appears to be something more for a normally aspirated setup, which the TIII was not.
 

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No intake tuning was implemented on the T3 engine.
 

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I think he's asking if it were contemplated, based on the sketch. It's not clear to me what that symbol is. Almost looks like a shackle or bracket.
 

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The T3 engine was supposed to be alot more than what it ended up being... Active intake tuning, variable valve timing, its own proper engine block and camshaft drivetrain that would have prevented alot of the failures that gave it such a terrible reputation for being unreliable. Bean counters got their way though.
 
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