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I replaced the timing belt on my Sebring after it broke on the road. Marks on camgears and crank lined up as per manual. Car runs down the road fine, but jerks and dies at idle, The codes by my scanner are crankshaft camshaft correlation Sensor A Bank 1. Is there a relearn process on these and how do you start the relearn?
 

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Shouldn't be a relearn that I am aware of, but you should have had the battery disconnected when you replaced the belt. There is a possibility that the belt tensioner is not working properly, meaning as the engine is increasing in rpm and then decreasing, the pressure of the crank in relation to the belt switches from pull to drag, and if the belt tensioner isn't working properly the slack in the belt could throw the cam and crank sensors out of sequence or phase.
 

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There may be a cam/crank relearn that you can do with the DRB III (or equivalent) scan tool.
It sounds worse than that though. I would double-check your timing marks as after a couple of engine revolutions with a freshly installed belt, their positions can change. The marks must be dead nuts on. Check with a straight edge and dental mirror across the cam bolt centers at TDC.
 

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I had an out of sync error with one of the used Neons I bought. The check engine light was on for it so I had to fix it before I could register it. in my case, everything was lined up fine and the car ran perfect so I hooked up the scanner and reset the sync on the sensors.

I think if your car is running poorly there is another issue. There could really be a sync issue or maybe a vacuum leak somewhere among other possibilities.
 

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Well if the "belt broke on the road" then you most likely have a bent valve. I would do a compression test and make sure all the cylinders are within spec. Then go from there.
 

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The 2.4L is 'possibly' an interference engine.
The valves won't hit the piston tops, but in very rare cases the intake and exhaust valves may bump into each other.
Both of the cams would have to spin to a stop in exactly the 'wrong' spot in order to have this occur. I have never seen it happen.
 

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IC, I agree, it would have to be an aftermarket cam and a very long odd account. When I ported the head on mine, I did everything I could with the head off the engine and rotating the cams and there was absolutely no time I could get the intake and exhaust to touch each other, and at the same time, could not get the valves to touch the piston at TDC. Valve float, which is even difficult to do would be the only way to hang them up and bend one. The 2.0 SOHC is another story, not sure about the DOHC.
 

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The high engine temperatures from high speed/high load operation could lengthen the valve stems due to heat expansion and cause remotely possible valve-to-valve face edge contact.
This possibility is listed in the Gates Rubber Company's website for timing belts. They will let you know which engines are interference and which are not.
 
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