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Super Moderator
1966 Crown Coupe, 2016 200 S AWD, 1962 Lark Daytona V8.
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23,853 Posts
Welcome to Allpar. A scan of the TCM portion of the PCM/TCM module might yield some more diagnostic information. A more advanced scan tool like the DRB III (or equivalent) may be needed.
CVI (clutch volume index) values for the clutch elements may be helpful to know, particularly the LR (low reverse) and UD (underdrive) clutch elements which are applied for 1st gear. The clutch fill time ranges are a measure of wear or internal leakage and are an adaptable memory for smooth clutch application.
If you can't get the same 'slip/shudder/bump' sensation in reverse, then the LR clutch may not be the problem and a closer look at the UD clutch may be warranted.
The TCM can also store Event Data which aren't really fault codes and can be read with the scan tool. These are recorded when an anomaly occurs in the transaxle that the TCM can detect and can display sensor values, input and outputs at the time of the occurrence.
ATF+4 is the only fluid that should be used in the 41TE. Clutch wear and damage will occur with any Dexron/Mercon and also some additives.
There are pressure taps along the front of the transaxle case for a pressure gauge if you need to observe line, LR or UD clutch pressure during the clutch 'slip' or 'bump' event. A shudder is usually a slipping clutch and this must be fixed ASAP because clutches don't last very long when this happens.
There was a TCM software upgrade on TSB #21-018-07A that addressed 1-2 and 2-3 shift harshness: https://cda.extra.chrysler.com/sqwrp/files/7283921-018-07.pdf
 

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Super Moderator
1966 Crown Coupe, 2016 200 S AWD, 1962 Lark Daytona V8.
Joined
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23,853 Posts
A little more diagnosis might confirm that an internal issue requiring a rebuild is the final answer here.
I think that all external/in-car service possibilities have been exhausted.
Dexron is a 41TE clutch killer. The clutch and seal material and fluid formulation changes in late 1995 made ATF+4 necessary. It was printed on the dipstick and in the owners manual/service literature, but many folks did not get the message in time.
If the condition of the vehicle warrants an expensive service like a transaxle rebuild and it is deemed that that is indeed the fix, then have the module software updated and ATF cooler flushed at the same service.
I don't know if there is any recourse with AAMCO. Their warranty should be 12/12. It's been less than a year, but has it been less than 12,000 miles ago? See if there is a parts column on the work order copy and if it mentions what ATF was charged out.
 

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Super Moderator
1966 Crown Coupe, 2016 200 S AWD, 1962 Lark Daytona V8.
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23,853 Posts
If your vehicle needs have changed away from needing the minivan space and this one is starting to nickel and dime you, then this might be the time to consider trading it. At 9 years and 135K miles, I seriously doubt that the dealer want to put it in the used car lot and will probably wholesale it. They may give you a 'token' trade-in amount for it towards a new car.
I will tell you that when me or the wife need to move something large or go on a long trip, we miss our old minivan. They just seem to do everything well.
 

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Super Moderator
1966 Crown Coupe, 2016 200 S AWD, 1962 Lark Daytona V8.
Joined
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23,853 Posts
The same 41TE seemed to fare better durability-wise in lighter vehicles like the PT and Sebring/Stratus and behind the lower-torque 2.4L engines. It was probably about at its torque-handling limit behind a strong V6 and in a 4000+ lb vehicle.
My wife also misses the chair-height seating and ease of stepping in and out of the minivan with her bad back. She needs help getting in and out of low-slung cars.
I will not comment on what I think her driving style for now. Thank You. :lol:
 
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