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As I am driving home on Friday I realize my car sounds like a race car and when I get to the house I find my exhaust broke right after the catalytic converter. I walk in the house and the wife asks me to check her car because the check engine light is on. I connect my odb reader to the Caliber and get p0032 and p2010. At this point it is already dark out so I figure I will check it on Sunday when I am off work. On Saturday she drives the car a few miles and tells me that the ac is not working now. The fans start, the light turns on but the air is not cold. The ac lines are warm. I decided to replace the 02 sensor and that did not make a difference. My odb scanner connect to my phone so I can monitor the voltage for the o2 sensors and both start at 1.27 and after a few minutes seam to fluctuate between 0.1 and 0.9 rarely going over that. I removed the Imrc and the runner side spins way more that the manifold side. I don't know if that is normal or not. Considering that all 3 things went out at the same time could it be something that they have in common like a pcm? Also the car is losing power at 20-30 miles an hour but seams to go away after the engine warms up. 2007 Dodge Caliber 2.0 sxt
 

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Welcome to Allpar. Both codes indicate 'voltage high' which may mean a missing ground. Having no ground will mean that there is nothing to pull down the 12 volts. An open circuit generally sets the 'voltage high' codes while a short to ground would set 'voltage low' codes.
I would more suspect having a wiring harness problem in common with these issues than a PCM (GPEC) problem. I have found broken, corroded open wires on these.
Refer to the service manual here. It is a large 131mb folder:
http://oskin.ru/pub/chrysler-dodge/manuals/Service Manuals/2007_PM_Caliber/2007-PM-SM.pdf
P0032 is covered on p. 9-41 and P2010 is covered on p. 9-694. If both of these occurred at the same time, I feel that it would be unusual for 2 components to fail together and I would first look at the wiring. The A/C issue may also be in the wiring.
See chapter 8W for locating wire colors, connectors, connector pinouts, splices, grounds and harness routing information.
There is probably nothing wrong with your old O2 sensor and hopefully nothing wrong with your intake manifold runner (swirl) valves or stepper (control) motor.
 

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The Calibers are known to have wiring problems where the main harness that's UNDER THE BATTERY TRAY, goes through a hole in the drivers side fender. Apparently they didn't leave enough slack in the harness and over time, wires in that bundle can chaff and rub the insulation off and cause a bare wire to start grounding out. In some cases, the wires have just broken and a new piece will need to be soldered in and heat shrink used. I'd suggest you pull the battery and battery tray, and start checking those wires.
 

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Thank you both for the information. I had some time today so i took the manual and a multi-meter and descended with vengeance on the wiring harness. I looked under the battery tray and found one wire that was burned out but i believe that was from the turn signal or lights. I soldered a new piece in a nice shrink tube and continued looking. Unfortunately noting else was visibly busted. I did both the voltage and resistance test on the O2 connector and IMRC and all was good. I know the O2 sensor is good as it is new and thus the only thing left in the manual is the PCM. So at this point I am thinking both you guys said ground issue so why is the manual saying nothing about it. With a rising feeling of suspicion I flip a few pages back to the O2 voltage low and find that the first thing to check for that code is pin one in the O2 harness to 12v. I look at the pin and it is for ground so i realize that this is the first thing I should have checked. I get the probe out, darkness, i get the multi meter to measure continuity and crickets, no sound no movement. At this point I am pretty sure you guys were right on the money so i grab a piece of 20ga and stick it in the female side of pin one of the O2 sensor and with an alligator clip attach it to the heat shield. I plug the sensor in, check the codes, reset them and when i try to start the car it won't turn. All kind of things go trough my mind, I shorted something out, burned the computer, nothing good. I go disconnect my wire and try again. The car won't start but it feels like it is the battery as it click and doesn't have enough power. I look at the negative battery connection and it has a crack in it. I replace it and get portable jumper connected, car starts and I feel very lucky. Now, I have a suspicion that my O2 ground rigging was not the cause for the car not starting. So I redo it, I reset the codes, refresh to make sure nothing else is wrong and start the car. No codes. I turn it off, I turn it back on and still no check engine. The wife comes out and I tell her that the codes are gone. She says is the AC working? I turn it on and hit to button, blessed cold air comes through. Now I am drinking a beer and writing this because next week I will have to track down the broken wire in the harness. Being that all 3 issues went away I can at least assume that the wire is broken before it hits the first connector. So it's just a matter of finding where that ground comes from. Thank you guys again. I will update if anything else pops up.
 

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I love to hear a success story. You did an excellent job of tracking the problem. Keep up the good work and let us know what you find. I've always hated doing electrical work. I just don't have the patience for it. Keep in mind too that these cars with the TIPM are very sensitive to voltage changes. If your battery is the least bit weak or drained, it can cause problems. If you have time, make sure it's fully charged to 12.5 volts and then have it load tested somewhere. Make sure they look at the CCA and put them in before testing it too. Some of those clowns never look and will tell you your battery is okay, even when it's not.
 

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I know that this is a pretty old post, but I'm hoping the OP is still around. I have a 2007 Jeep Patriot which recently had the exact same codes (P0032 and P2010) and an A/C that wasn't blowing cold air all pop up at the same time. I found this forum post and was hopeful that my issue could have the same root cause. Unfortunately, I'm not mechanically skilled, so I first called a mechanic I recently used and had some trust level with, but the receptionist/guy I spoke with suggested that for diagnosing electrical wiring issues I was probably best off to bring it to a Jeep dealer.

So I set up an appointment with my closest Jeep dealer for this morning. I printed out this forum thread and even highlighted some key sentences. When I got to the dealer, the initial guy pulled the codes and I told him that I suspected it being a wiring issue. When I asked him to pass along the info I printed out to the mechanics he told me to leave it on the front seat. I didn't get a great feeling that they were going to really explore this avenue.

A couple of hours later I get a call back rattling off a number of things I needed to replace (A/C compressor, things related to the two codes mentioned - intake manifold and O2 sensor, and some other things), all to the tune of about $2300. So now I'm going to pick it back up, pay them the $220 diagnosis fee, and try to bring it to someone who will hopefully explore the possibility of it being a wiring issue.

If anyone can provide me with a clear couple of sentences that will summarize what this issue could be and what they should look into, I would greatly appreciate it. Otherwise, I guess I'll just have to resort to printing this thread out again and hoping that one of these mechanics will actually take the time to read it.
 

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I would have no faith in a dealership going on any advice they found in a forum post.

Wiring issues, in my opinion, are the kind of thing you really want to try and find yourself. They're a pain to deal with no matter how long you've worked on cars or how much training you've had, since they can be time-consuming to find. A local mechanic might charge less than the stealership wanted to shotgun parts at it, but it probably won't be cheap either way.

For starters, the Patriot and the Caliber share a platform, so I would not be surprised if you had an issue at the location chuzz mentioned. Take the battery out (you'll probably need a ratchet with deep-well metric sockets) and see if you can see anything wrong with the wire bundle underneath it. If you can't, get yourself a cheap multimeter with alligator clip leads so you can start diagnosing the wires and components. But your first step is just having a look.

With regards to not having any mechanical ability: Working on a car is fundamentally doing a series of simple tasks in a particular order. There are manuals and guides available for pretty much anything you would want to do on a vehicle, and 90% of the repairs you'll do can be accomplished with a basic set of sockets and screwdrivers and a multimeter. Online resources like this forum are great, there are a lot of guys on here who work/worked in the industry or as mechanics, and many more of us who didn't, but have learned how to work on vehicles by just going out and trying it. People learn best by doing. Don't be afraid to get your hands dirty. Nobody was born with a wrench in their hand.

This would be a good project for a beginner. It's not difficult (although it can be time-consuming), there's very little that you could damage, and you can get some familiarity with basic electrical and mechanical tools. At the very least, you can become more familiar with your vehicle so you can get a better sense of an expensive but necessary repair vs. getting raked over the coals when you do go to a shop.
 
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Why don't you try a reset of the TIPM to start with, CT-Scott? It's very simple. You disconnect your ground cable from your battery and then the positive cable. You clamp them, tape them or hold them together for 15 minutes. While you're waiting, clean both battery posts and when it's time to put the clamps back on, clean them too. Put the positive cable on the battery first and snug it, then the ground cable and snug it. This will reset the TIPM and if it's just a loose or dirty connection at the battery, you MIGHT be good to go. While you have the cables off the battery, take a good look at them and make sure neither one is cracked or corroded. The green corrosion on a cable will indicate a problem and the cable may need replacing. Get your battery load tested somewhere too. These TIPM's are extremely sensitive to voltage drops and can cause you all kinds of headaches when sometimes all you need is a new battery.
 

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I just fixed this exact issue today on my 2008 Jeep Patriot. It ended up being corroded wires on the G110 ground connector. This connector is located on the chassis near the bottom of the engine coolant reservoir tank. Most of the ground wires on this point had been nearly corroded completely through, causing the poor connection that caused both P2010 and P0032 codes, along with my A/C compressor not working.
 

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Thanks for the replies and encouragement. The thread I started at jeeppatriot.com didn't get much action. Here's an update:

I called back the other mechanic that I had a better trust level with and explained the situation again and asked if there was any chance that they could take a serious look into my theory of it being a wiring issue. It was late on a Friday but he told me to stop by with a copy of this forum thread and the mechanics there would give it a read. When I stopped by, I was able to speak directly with the owner / head mechanic (FWIW, it's my understanding that he used to be the head mechanic or something like that at an Audi dealer for a number of years). He's a very personable guy who doesn't mind taking the time to have a lengthy conversation with his customers. He agreed that the fact that I was having multiple unrelated issues firing at once made the wiring theory sound pretty reasonable. I dropped it back off on Sunday night for them to look at Monday morning.

BTW, another issue that I had had for a while which I told him about (in case it was related) was that the parking brake light wouldn't go off.

Apparently they were pretty busy that day...when he called me at the end of the day he said that he only had about an hour to look into it, but he did think it was wiring related. Another indication of that was the fact that he was unable to clear the codes.

The next day he told me that they confirmed it as a ground issue but couldn't track down the specific location of the issue and that it could be costly to try to do so, but that they were able to create a new ground which appeared to fix the issue and allow them to clear the codes. He said that the parking brake light was now functioning correctly again, too. All told, he was going to charge for 2 hours of labor (around $180-190).

Unfortunately, there was some bad news...the A/C was pretty much out of freon and there was an A/C "pipe" (?) that was leaking. I asked about the dealer's claim that I needed a new A/C compressor and he said that he couldn't be certain, but from some sort of test he did (I forget the specifics) it seemed like it was probably fine. At this point it was the end of the day again, so I told him to keep it another day and also to look into an issue that the dealer claimed I had: a transmission fluid leak which they said would require re-sealing the pan (?) and new transmission fluid, and to price out fixing the A/C.

The next day (yesterday) he told me that there was indeed a transmission fluid leak, and that the engine also had a minor leak (engine fluid?). And if I wanted him to deal with all of that, he'd have to drain the oil, so I may as well do an oil/filter change. The total cost for everything (including the grounding wire issue) was going to be about $1000. He wasn't sure if he'd get all of the parts that day, but I told him it was fine to keep it since we could get by this week without it.

I wasn't happy about putting another $1000 into this Jeep because I had already had to fix so many other issues in the 2 years we've owned this (bought used - 2007), but if everything was hopefully going to be working well, it was worth the $1000 versus trying to unload it and buy another used vehicle which would have its own set of problems. And that $1000 sounded a lot better than what the Jeep dealer quoted me (and they didn't even think there was a wiring issue - so they would have probably called me back later once they realized that and added more to the repair quote).

I haven't heard back from him yet today, but I'm anticipating it being finished sometime today. Hopefully he didn't discover any other issues. :)

The other thing now is whether I can have any success getting the Jeep dealer to give me back any of the $220 diagnosis fee they charged me. The fact that there was a legitimate transmission fluid leak might make that even more difficult (if I even had a chance to begin with), but I'm looking at it from the perspective that I gave them a specific request to confirm whether I had a wiring/ground issue and they obviously didn't follow those instructions.
 

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With how crowded engine compartments are these days, creating a new ground point rather than repairing the original makes a lot of sense. I did that with a headlight problem in my '05 Pacifica.
 

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So I have the Jeep back and all codes are clear. The "fixed" parking brake light is actually still broken, but in the opposite way (it's always off now), so I'll follow up on that.

Now I need to get my (already very late) emissions test done before any new codes pop up. ;)

Anyone know the drive cycle I need to run through to get the Patriot "ready" for emissions testing? I have a Bluetooth code reader and an iOS app, but I found out later that this particular reader isn't compatible with the OBD Fusion app (one of the premier apps for iOS), so I have to use a lower-quality app (iOBD2), and while it does have a "Readiness" section, it's a bit confusing to interpret.
 

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I just fixed this exact issue today on my 2008 Jeep Patriot. It ended up being corroded wires on the G110 ground connector. This connector is located on the chassis near the bottom of the engine coolant reservoir tank. Most of the ground wires on this point had been nearly corroded completely through, causing the poor connection that caused both P2010 and P0032 codes, along with my A/C compressor not working.
Hallo Dan I 'm from Switzerland and my Jeep Patriot has the same I have the P2010 P0032 A/C Not working and the Handbrakelight on. I changed Batterie, cleaned Manifold Runner. Car runs great without mechanical Problem. I'm sure it is the ground connector to. To get to The G110 how you do it. What you have to remove.
were is it exactly locatet? Would Be great when you have a Foto. Thank you very much for helping. The Jeep Dealers here are likely the Same Type as in your Country. Best Regards
 

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Thank you very much for your answer with the picture. You have to replace the whole wire assembly? When yes do you have a Retail Number.
Or what did you do to fix it. In electrical things I'm not that good.

Thank you for taking your time to saving my time. (And sorry for my English Gramma)

Best Regards
 

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You should not have to replace the wiring assembly. See what the connection situation is first.
Remove the nut and terminal from the stud to visually inspect for corrosion, looseness or other physical damage. I have seen a layer of paint on a contact area cause a poor connection as well (generic image):
images
Clean and reassemble the ground, then see if the electrical problems have been remedied. G110 is a ground point for the A/C compressor, right headlamp and ABS module. These all need a good ground.
Inspect and clean the battery terminals in the same way. Many times the connection can look good on the outside, but corrosion can form between the battery posts and insides of the terminal clamps that you can't see until you take them off the posts. Rinse the top of the battery with clean water if needed.
aid2930975-v4-728px-Clean-Battery-Terminals-Step-3.jpg
Sometimes the corrosion is a hard scale deposit that has to be scraped off down to the shiny metal. Reassemble and tighten the terminals. Reset your clock.
 

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Thank you very much for your help. I just saw the Second page with your descpricion. So i will try it and see if it works. I'm very grateful having a help this way. I will inform you when it's done.
Best Regards
 

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That's exactly the picture Ralf77. It's a little tricky to get to but enough space to work on it. I had to really examine the connector to notice the wires had corroded. I tried to clean the connection a time or two and it actually caused by right turn signal to dim and my hand brake light to flicker as if it was on (as they share this same grounding point). I ended up having to cut the wires below where they were corroded, re-strip them and crimp them down in a new connector that I reattached to the ground point. Sorry for the late response and thanks Imperial for the diagram.
 
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