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I have a 2011 DGC "Crew" that is going through brake rotors like crazy; it's in the shop now for three warped rotors (two rear, one front), and this is not the first time it's happened. Why do the rotors keep warping? Are the brakes under-engineered on these vans? My '06 DGC doesn't go through rotors like this; appreciate any insight anyone has on this.
 

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There shouldn't be any problem with them. Where'd you get your brakes?
 

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One common cause of brake rotor warping is overtorqued lug nuts. Most mechanics slam them on with impact tools instead of hand-torquing to the spec. It's almost guaranteed that when I get a car back from service where a wheel has been off, I nearly wrench my back or break a lug trying to get it loose. Last time, I could not even get a lug nut off with a cross-shaped lug wrench. I finally resorted to a 1/2 inch drive ratchet and 19mm socket, with a handle about 20 inches long. Even at that, I nearly didn't get it, and when it turned, it made a very loud snap noise when it first moved. Mechanics are torquing them over 150-200 ft-lbs, when most are spec'd between 95 and 115 ft-lbs. This can also damage aluminum alloy rims.
 
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Agree with Bob. Over torqued lug nuts are common cause for warped rotors.

The '09-'10 DGC and Journeys did have brake issues, but by 2011 that issued had been resolved.
 

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Change dealers

The techs at that dealer are nothing more than lug nuts (pun intended).

When I had my conversion van, I had aluminum A.R.E. wheels on it. The tire/wheel shop that installed them gave me a torque stick. They said that every set of wheels they sell, goes out the door with one.

Each time the van went for service I made it crystal clear that the techs were to hand tighten the lugs, then use the torque stick. Otherwise, the dealer was going to pay for new wheels, and new rotors. I put the torque stick on the driver’s seat when I left it for wheels off service.
 

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Some aftermarket semi-metallic brake pads are hard enough of a composition to 'eat' rotors. I find that ceramic pads are generally much easier on rotors, less dust and quieter.
The Pros & Cons of Ceramic Brakes - The Advantages of Ceramic Brakes (at http://www.autoanything.com/brakes/pros-and-cons-of-ceramic-brakes.aspx )
Make sure that all 4 brakes are doing their share of braking. If 1 or 2 brakes aren't doing their fair share, the others must work that much harder to stop the vehicle. You may not notice a pull.
 

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When we had our 2012, it ate brakes - it was a base model with 16" tires.
When we bought the 2015, it had 17" as the 16" would no longer fit due to the upgraded brakes that were being used starting in 2014. After 80,000 KM, were are still on the originals, and I had done 2 brakes jobs on the 2012 before I hit this mileage.
 

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Change dealers

The techs at that dealer are nothing more than lug nuts (pun intended).

When I had my conversion van, I had aluminum A.R.E. wheels on it. The tire/wheel shop that installed them gave me a torque stick. They said that every set of wheels they sell, goes out the door with one.

Each time the van went for service I made it crystal clear that the techs were to hand tighten the lugs, then use the torque stick. Otherwise, the dealer was going to pay for new wheels, and new rotors. I put the torque stick on the driver’s seat when I left it for wheels off service.
Just because you put the torque stick on the seat, doesn't mean it gets used. YOU need to check the torque yourself. I'm not sure what the spec is on your van, but most of my Mopars in the past few years were torqued to 100 ft.lb.
 
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Discussion Starter #11
When we had our 2012, it ate brakes - it was a base model with 16" tires.
When we bought the 2015, it had 17" as the 16" would no longer fit due to the upgraded brakes that were being used starting in 2014. After 80,000 KM, were are still on the originals, and I had done 2 brakes jobs on the 2012 before I hit this mileage.
Ours is a Crew model with 16" wheels and tires. I had come across a couple of references online to some kind of an upgrade after 2013 or so, which tracks with some of the comments here. None of the wheels/tires had been off the van prior to the latest warpage, so I can't put it down to overtorquing.
 

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Ouch!

I think the "upgrade" in 2013 had more to do with the rear caliper adapters than anything else. The part number for the regular front rotors did switch from 4779783AA to 4779783AB in 2013, but that's not all that big an indicator. They also added HD brakes in 2013. There wasn't a "switch" as such, just another option. The regular brakes are by far the bigger movers.
 

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Actually, '14 and up all have the "HD brakes" hence all having 17" wheels to clear the rotors. There was a switch made during the '13 model year to where they got rid of the light duty brakes. At least that's how it's been explained to me and in more than one thread here.
 

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Yeah, 2008-2013 have severely undersized brakes.

Our rotors were all severely warped at 40,000km which is completely insane. The replacement rotors and pads have done better, but were still needing to be replaced around 80/90,000km

For the record, none of our other vehicles have eaten through and warped brakes as badly as our 2011 Caravan. And they had to deal with more severe driving conditions.

2014+ brakes are much better, and what dumbler should have put on all of the 2008+ vans.
 

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Actually, 2017 was the RT body's only model year that had the HD rotors only. It wasn't even a real model year, just an overlap year while they were running up production for the new RU minivan.
 

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Picked up two new tires today on the front for my 92 Plymouth Grand Voyager. Looked out into the shop and it looked like the tech was using either a breaker bar or torque wrench and hand tightening the lug nuts.
 

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THERE IS YOUR ANSWER! I have actually replaced aluminum oil pans because the dealer air wrenched the oil pug into the pan, which is aluminum, and shortly afterwards stripped. So.....

Two things: One, insist you visually observe the rotors being replaced, and two, make sure when the air ratchet comes out, NO!!! Lug luts do not go on with them unless it is set to 50psi and then torque wrenched correctly to torque afterwards.

Second, rotors work best when they are gently heated up and then allowed to cool. This also dresses the pads properly. Only takes a few minutes, a gentle riding of the brake for about 15 seconds at 30mph, let rest by cruising about five minutes, then do it again. Done. They seat, they are hardened, they are good to go. Been doing this for years with new brakes and they last a lot longer than anyone else when it comes to brake changes, as in five years vice three years. It's an old-timer thing.
 
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I'm wondering if there is caliper problem,sticking pistons.i have not seen rotor problems on these vans
That is also a problem on the non-HD brakes

Chrysler actually offered assistance on 2008-2010 vans at least because of the undersized rotors/brakes.
 

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As stated, all 4 brakes must work at 100% or else the ones that do work will have to work harder to stop the vehicle.
Braking = heat. Heat shortens pad and rotor life.
The customer pad/rotor assistance program at the dealers on the early RT minivans was attributed to a vendor/supplier issue. Granted, the newer brakes are larger, as are the wheels, but the factory stated that the standard brakes were sufficient and not the issue early on.
 
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