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KOG
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2000 and earlier OHC V8 and V10 Fords have 4 threads in the aluminum heads. They will spit plugs. There are thread repair kits which Ford won't use as they prefer to replace the heads at your expense. This is a common, well known problem on MH chassis. Note too that they use different plug numbers for the right and left cylinder banks.
 

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Virginia Gentleman
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KOG said:
2000 and earlier OHC V8 and V10 Fords have 4 threads in the aluminum heads. They will spit plugs. There are thread repair kits which Ford won't use as they prefer to replace the heads at your expense. This is a common, well known problem on MH chassis. Note too that they use different plug numbers for the right and left cylinder banks.
The later Triton engines (up to 2003-2004 I think) have this issue as well. Two families we know both have Navigators with the 5.4L Triton. Both have spit out sparkplugs. And Ford refuses to cover this under warranty. Some had happen before the recommended change interval. Yes, Ford's fix is to replace the heads at your expense - $4,000. There is a kit that works (not helicoil).
 

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During the '80s thru mid '90s when we had a bad spark plug or a tune up, we either used original champion copper or Mopar replacements. When we used other brands, sometimes they just created more problems. Especially loved it when customers would bring their vehicles in complaining of surging, bucking, misfiring problems right after their tuned up the engine. 10 will get you 20 it was the use of different after market parts, especially loved when they use non-resistor spark plugs! That will cause a host of electrical problems!
 

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I am due to replace plugs on my Hemi and I am looking for plugs that will reduce the work you need to replacing the plugs. I know there is Champion/NGK copper that is recommended but the effort of replacing it every 25,000 miles (40,000 kilometers) is a pain already. Has anyone tried Iridium or Platinum but had not compromised its performance or at least did not have any issues? There are these comprehensive reviews of different plugs that I ran across in an article here and I know that all the reviews are too good to be true compared to anyone here who had tried it already. I am leaning towards platinum and have not decided which brand. What would you recommend and why or why not? If I can save myself from replacing the plugs every now and then that would be very helpful.
 

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Platinum plugs can certainly be problematic on wasted spark ignitions like Neons.

I think the early 5.7 Hemi Engines were wasted spark, not sure about later ones.

Thanks
Randy
 
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The Hemi later swapped to a 100k mile plug. If you were going to “upgrade” from the copper plug, I’d consider the factory NGK iridium plug as used 2011 and later, not a gimmicky one.
 
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Agreed, I would skip Platinum and go Iridium or keep the copper.

Appears the newer 5.7's are wasted spark as well.

Thanks
Randy
 
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Do 5 and 7 first. Patience is the name. I don't remember if I used my universal joint but I seem to recall that the 3/8 ratchet with the 3" extension and plug socket worked well.
 
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IC is correct - check to see what it's actually supposed to have. in the V8 models, they were all Champs through 2010, for sure.

NGK single-electrode platinums started appearing in 2011 on SRT/fleet vehicles, primarily to reduce maintenance requirements. By 2015, everything was platinum, and they had moved to the NGK single-electrode Iridium in 2017, beginning again with the SRT/fleet vehicles.

If anyone with an LD/LA Charger/Challenger/300 wants a little cheap entertainment, open your hood to a Ram or Durango owner, and show them how easy the plugs (and pretty much everything else) are on the cars.
 

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IC is correct - check to see what it's actually supposed to have. in the V8 models, they were all Champs through 2010, for sure.

NGK single-electrode platinums started appearing in 2011 on SRT/fleet vehicles, primarily to reduce maintenance requirements. By 2015, everything was platinum, and they had moved to the NGK single-electrode Iridium in 2017, beginning again with the SRT/fleet vehicles.

If anyone with an LD/LA Charger/Challenger/300 wants a little cheap entertainment, open your hood to a Ram or Durango owner, and show them how easy the plugs (and pretty much everything else) are on the cars.
I definitely noticed this when I compared my 07 Jeep to a Charger I was looking at, on the Jeep the under hood TIPM and other electrical stuff are in the middle of your way for the 2 front plugs on the driver's side, the pass side is easy. Not as bad as a Ram though. Every time I do the plugs on the Hemi I hold my breath, and recall how much I prefer engines with cast iron heads!
 

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Your post confirms my findings.

Platinum can cause issues in wasted spark ignitions.

Copper provide the best spark but wear much sooner than ideal.

Someone eventually realized saving a few cents per Engine probably wasn't a savings.

No doubt Chrysler should have run Iridium spark plugs from the very start!

Some Fords come with 3 Platinum and 3 Iridium, in the same Engine!!

Now that's bean counting at its finest (lowest)

Thanks
Randy




IC is correct - check to see what it's actually supposed to have. in the V8 models, they were all Champs through 2010, for sure.

NGK single-electrode platinums started appearing in 2011 on SRT/fleet vehicles, primarily to reduce maintenance requirements. By 2015, everything was platinum, and they had moved to the NGK single-electrode Iridium in 2017, beginning again with the SRT/fleet vehicles.

If anyone with an LD/LA Charger/Challenger/300 wants a little cheap entertainment, open your hood to a Ram or Durango owner, and show them how easy the plugs (and pretty much everything else) are on the cars.
 
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Virginia Gentleman
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Do 5 and 7 first. Patience is the name. I don't remember if I used my universal joint but I seem to recall that the 3/8 ratchet with the 3" extension and plug socket worked well.
For the 4 plugs under the brake booster on my Ram I found a plug socket with a universal joint, 3" extension on a 3/8 ratchet worked best. For the rest a regular plug socket and 6" extension was fine. Also found it helpful to remove the air cleaner box and hose to give more working access on the passenger side.

And pack plenty of patience. You're pretty much working blind when removing the bolts holding the coils under the brake booster. To replace those 4 plugs took almost half the time I spent changing the plugs. The passenger side was a breeze by comparison.
 

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For universal joints, I have found those designed for impact tools to be much better. The swivel action is very smooth and transfers the torque much more precisely.
 

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The Hemi later swapped to a 100k mile plug. If you were going to “upgrade” from the copper plug, I’d consider the factory NGK iridium plug as used 2011 and later, not a gimmicky one.

Iridium added to my voting list. Thanks.
 

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Dealer wanted $650 to change plugs in my 2014. I purchased original NGK iridiums and a magnetic spark plug socket for about $120 and did them myself. I used 3/8 inch flex head, universal and and an extension about 4 inches. No real problems and it took be about 2-3 hours but I am old and slow. I tried to use a torque wrench but it was hard to do on the back ones, so I used the one in my head. I really liked the magnetic spark plug socket. It made getting the plugs out and into the tubes easy.
 

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Dealer wanted $650 to change plugs in my 2014. I purchased original NGK iridiums and a magnetic spark plug socket for about $120 and did them myself. I used 3/8 inch flex head, universal and and an extension about 4 inches. No real problems and it took be about 2-3 hours but I am old and slow. I tried to use a torque wrench but it was hard to do on the back ones, so I used the one in my head. I really liked the magnetic spark plug socket. It made getting the plugs out and into the tubes easy.
I agree with you, I'd be getting the magnetic spark plug socket. (for convenience) I'll check it online.

Another vote for Iridium. Thanks bud.
 

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You want some interesting stories, Bosch platinum plugs in a Ford 5.0L (302) iron head V8, missfire, erratic running all grades of fun. I agree with Bob Lincoln, when I had my shop I stocked AC plugs for GM, Champion for Chrysler Motorcraft (after Ford sold Autolite to Fram) for Fords, Bosch for German cars (Brits used Champions) and NGK for Japanese. If an owner wanted something different it was his choice, but if it didn't work he was going to pay to have them changed. I would not install "gimmick" plugs, period.

On the dual plug hemi, such a concept, Ford was doing that on the 2300 Rangers, and Nissan (actually Datsun at that time) on their 4 cyl trucks quite a while ago. I would still bet putting 16 plugs in a new generation hemi beats changing 8 in a 440 in an intermediate body, especially if it was hot (third degree burns anyone?). As for access, the #8 plug on my 460 is a bear, it is partially under the brake booster and hidden by the EGR tube. A short extension is needed and once it is loose you need to remove the ratchet as you can't unscrew the plug far enough with it on, even then the extension hits the firewall just as the plug clears the threads, #7 is almost as bad since it is hidden by the coil and vacuum valves bracket. The EFI 460 was obviously a stopgap to keep a big gasoline workhorse available (still torquier than my son's V10 Excursion).
 

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KOG
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My favorite is the right rear plug on a Firebird 400. I only ever did one of those, customer car. It had three different brands of plug in it at 50K, the right rear was still an original AC. Took me over a hour to do that one plug, took socket, box end and open end to get it done.

I just really don't have any use for stuff like that. Just did the plugs on the 02 T&C 3.8 for the second time. Some groping in the dark on the rear bank and that's with it on the lift. Not easy, but possible.
 

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Virginia Gentleman
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My favorite is the right rear plug on a Firebird 400.
Try the right rear plug on the 265 cu in V8 installed in the Monza's. It required lifting the engine to replace. From what I read even dealers wouldn't change them - they'd replace the other 7 and charge the customer for changing 8. Fortunately the '79 Monza I had was equipped with the 2.5L Iron Duke.
 
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