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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
cleaning my tank found 2 quater size holes...no way to fix...building a ratrod so not wanting to spend 300 on a new tank or put a keg in the back..just something close that fits
i heard 65 mustang tanks...
90s s10 tanks....
just really dont know which way to go..
i know i will need to fab something thats not a problem just dont know what will work the best....
 

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The fuel tank for a 1965-66 Ford Mustang formed the floor of the trunk. So it probably could be adapted for your truck. I would imagine that you would mount it between the rear axle and rear bumper area of the truck? That is NOT the safest location as it could be compromised in a rear end collision. The fuel filler neck points upward and that could be challenge if mounted against the underside of the truck bed.

Why not use a tank from the 1987-90 short bed Dakota truck? Those models used a smaller 15 gallon tank mounted on the inside of the frame rail and along side and above the driveshaft. That would provide greater collision protection and might be a slight bit easier to retrofit versus the Ford trunk mounted tank.

Here is a video of the fuel tank on a short wheel base Dakota. It shows the tank assembly with the bed removed.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The fuel tank for a 1965-66 Ford Mustang formed the floor of the trunk. So it probably could be adapted for your truck. I would imagine that you would mount it between the rear axle and rear bumper area of the truck? That is NOT the safest location as it could be compromised in a rear end collision. The fuel filler neck points upward and that could be challenge if mounted against the underside of the truck bed.

Why not use a tank from the 1987-90 short bed Dakota truck? Those models used a smaller 15 gallon tank mounted on the inside of the frame rail and along side and above the driveshaft. That would provide greater collision protection and might be a slight bit easier to retrofit versus the Ford trunk mounted tank.

Here is a video of the fuel tank on a short wheel base Dakota. It shows the tank assembly with the bed removed.

I tried to look up the measurements for the tank didn't find any..as whay I see even on ebay there's none...my old tank is 41 1/2 x 16 x 9
 

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I tried to look up the measurements for the tank didn't find any..as whay I see even on ebay there's none...my old tank is 41 1/2 x 16 x 9
I have access to a 1991 Dakota long bed truck. Tomorrow I will check the measurements of the fuel tank and report back to you. It has the 22 gallon tank so it will have greater length but the width and height should be identical to the 15 gallon variation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have access to a 1991 Dakota long bed truck. Tomorrow I will check the measurements of the fuel tank and report back to you. It has the 22 gallon tank so it will have greater length but the width and height should be identical to the 15 gallon variation.
Cool thanks for the help
 

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I measured the 1991 Dakota 22 gallon fuel tank. L = 42 in; W = 18 in; H = 19 in. The additional 7 gallons between the small and large tank would be found in additional length. Doing the math the additional length of the 22 gallon tank is 4.5 inches. So the approximate dimensions on the 15 gallon tank:
L = 37.5 in; W = 18 in; H = 19 in.

.. . . . .my old tank is 41 1/2 x 16 x 9 . . . .
Looks like length would not be an issue. Width is close and might fit???? Height is an issue at it seems the 15 gallon Dakota tank might have to sit with partial exposure below the frame rail??? That might require some additional metal reinforcement around the bottom of the tank for protection??

Today I was thinking about this and there is a different fuel tank from an older Chevy pickup that is closer to your original tank dimensions. The 1973 - 87 Chevy C10 / GMC 1500 short wheelbase 1/2 ton trucks used a side-saddle outside the frame mounted fuel tank. Maybe that would be easier to retrofit into your Dodge. Here is a link to a picture of one of these tanks. Maybe you could find one of these at a salvage yard. It was mounted on the short bed / 6.5 foot bed trucks and had 16 gallon capacity. Connecting the fuel filler would be a challenge.

1979 Chevy C10 Truck Front of Rear Axle Mounted Gallon Fuel Tank at 1A Auto.com


3-81 GM Truck Fuel Tank. New. This high quality replacement tank is a direct replacement for your damaged or leaky original. This tank mounts in front of the rear axle.

Specifications:

· Capacity: 16 Gallons

· Dimensions: 42-7/8 X 14-1/8 X 10-1/2 inches

· Small Filler Pipe: 1-1/4 inch inside diameter

Includes the lock ring and the gasket for sending unit.

This tank is Department of Transportation (DOT) and Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) approved.

And thinking back to your original question about using a fuel tank from a 1965 - 66 Ford Mustang, here is a video link to a R & R on that fuel tank. It gives a good visual picture of the tank orientation and the challenges of the fuel filler neck location and fuel pickup.

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I measured the 1991 Dakota 22 gallon fuel tank. L = 42 in; W = 18 in; H = 19 in. The additional 7 gallons between the small and large tank would be found in additional length. Doing the math the additional length of the 22 gallon tank is 4.5 inches. So the approximate dimensions on the 15 gallon tank:
L = 37.5 in; W = 18 in; H = 19 in.



Looks like length would not be an issue. Width is close and might fit???? Height is an issue at it seems the 15 gallon Dakota tank might have to sit with partial exposure below the frame rail??? That might require some additional metal reinforcement around the bottom of the tank for protection??

Today I was thinking about this and there is a different fuel tank from an older Chevy pickup that is closer to your original tank dimensions. The 1973 - 87 Chevy C10 / GMC 1500 short wheelbase 1/2 ton trucks used a side-saddle outside the frame mounted fuel tank. Maybe that would be easier to retrofit into your Dodge. Here is a link to a picture of one of these tanks. Maybe you could find one of these at a salvage yard. It was mounted on the short bed / 6.5 foot bed trucks and had 16 gallon capacity. Connecting the fuel filler would be a challenge.

1979 Chevy C10 Truck Front of Rear Axle Mounted Gallon Fuel Tank at 1A Auto.com


3-81 GM Truck Fuel Tank. New. This high quality replacement tank is a direct replacement for your damaged or leaky original. This tank mounts in front of the rear axle.

Specifications:

· Capacity: 16 Gallons

· Dimensions: 42-7/8 X 14-1/8 X 10-1/2 inches

· Small Filler Pipe: 1-1/4 inch inside diameter

Includes the lock ring and the gasket for sending unit.

This tank is Department of Transportation (DOT) and Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) approved.

And thinking back to your original question about using a fuel tank from a 1965 - 66 Ford Mustang, here is a video link to a R & R on that fuel tank. It gives a good visual picture of the tank orientation and the challenges of the fuel filler neck location and fuel pickup.

Thanks for the help the mustang tank would have to go to the back of the frame I would have to move 2 of major frame rail supports not trying to do that...I would need something in front of the axle mounted to side driver frame rail so it would miss the drive shaft because I lowered the truck
 

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cleaning my tank found 2 quater size holes...no way to fix...building a ratrod so not wanting to spend 300 on a new tank or put a keg in the back..just something close that fits
i heard 65 mustang tanks...
90s s10 tanks....
just really dont know which way to go..
i know i will need to fab something thats not a problem just dont know what will work the best....

is your stock tank behind the seat in the cab?I have a 1947 fargo and that's where it is located.have a 1964 jeep cj5,the gas tank is under the front seat.How much will you be driving this truck?Are you concerned with the safety of where this tank would be located?
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
is your stock tank behind the seat in the cab?I have a 1947 fargo and that's where it is located.have a 1964 jeep cj5,the gas tank is under the front seat.How much will you be driving this truck?Are you concerned with the safety of where this tank would be located?
It's located under driver cab...attached to side frame rail...only driving it local I'm just really trying to find one that's close to my original the filler hoke is behind driver door out side of cab
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The c10 tank Allan is talking about is a good size but the filler hole is in a weird spot goona be tough getting that to work. ..the 85 s10 looks to be good too but all the sending units are electric and expensive. ..I will need a basic one I'm running a poly 318
 

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The c10 tank Allan is talking about is a good size but the filler hole is in a weird spot goona be tough getting that to work. ..the 85 s10 looks to be good too but all the sending units are electric and expensive. ..I will need a basic one I'm running a poly 318
Nice engine choice.I am sure you have thought of this..can you get anyone to fix your tank?Is it completely rotten or is there meat left that could be welded or brazed to?
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Nice engine choice.I am sure you have thought of this..can you get anyone to fix your tank?Is it completely rotten or is there meat left that could be welded or brazed to?
It has a small hole try to mig weld it made a bigger hole then took it to a radiator shop he tried to brazed it and more holes show up ..only on the side the top and bottom is soild
 

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On the car shows I've seen some amazing stuff. The trick is you have to know where to go. With the new computer control "printing" you can take the old part in like your tank. The computer copies it and then makes a duplicate of it. Sometimes its cheaper then you think and sometimes not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
On the car shows I've seen some amazing stuff. The trick is you have to know where to go. With the new computer control "printing" you can take the old part in like your tank. The computer copies it and then makes a duplicate of it. Sometimes its cheaper then you think and sometimes not.
Yep it looks like the s10 is gonna be my best option just need to figure which sending unit will be best to use
 

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. . . . Yep it looks like the s10 is gonna be my best option just need to figure which sending unit will be best to use . . . .
Follow this link to the discussion about fuel gauge sending units. Are you going to use the stock 1954 instrument panel with fuel and temperature gauges or use an aftermarket custom gauge set?

Universal Fuel Sender Questions and Troubleshooting

If you use the 1985 Chevy S10 tank, I would suggest you use the S10 fuel sending unit that fits this tank. Now one problem you will have is how the GM analog gauge works versus Mopar fuel gauge. On analog GM gauges as the tank float rises (empty to full) the resistance in the circuit increases (0 - 90 ohms). On a Mopar analog fuel gauge as the tank float rises the resistance in the circuit decreases (73 - 10 ohms). Since the circuit is DC you can reverse the leads for the fuel gauge at the tank (sending unit and ground) and that should resolve that issue.

I am assuming that you are using a more modern powertrain in this truck with a 12 volt electrical system. I would think that if you are using the original 1954 instrument panel (6 volt gauges) then you would need a voltage limiter to bring the 12 volts down to about 6 for the gauges??? Also since the 1954 instrument panel was designed for 6 volt, positive ground, some wiring polarity reversal at the gauges might be in order for a modern 12 volt, negative ground system so the 1954 gauges would function properly???
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Follow this link to the discussion about fuel gauge sending units. Are you going to use the stock 1954 instrument panel with fuel and temperature gauges or use an aftermarket custom gauge set?

Universal Fuel Sender Questions and Troubleshooting

If you use the 1985 Chevy S10 tank, I would suggest you use the S10 fuel sending unit that fits this tank. Now one problem you will have is how the GM analog gauge works versus Mopar fuel gauge. On analog GM gauges as the tank float rises (empty to full) the resistance in the circuit increases (0 - 90 ohms). On a Mopar analog fuel gauge as the tank float rises the resistance in the circuit decreases (73 - 10 ohms). Since the circuit is DC you can reverse the leads for the fuel gauge at the tank (sending unit and ground) and that should resolve that issue.

I am assuming that you are using a more modern powertrain in this truck with a 12 volt electrical system. I would think that if you are using the original 1954 instrument panel (6 volt gauges) then you would need a voltage limiter to bring the 12 volts down to about 6 for the gauges??? Also since the 1954 instrument panel was designed for 6 volt, positive ground, some wiring polarity reversal at the gauges might be in order for a modern 12 volt, negative ground system so the 1954 gauges would function properly???
Yes I was hoping you use the gauges in the truck but it wouldn't make a difference if I used something aftermarket and I have to rewire the truck but I'm only doing a basic wiring job headlights,taillights,turn singals,fuel gauge, and whatever I need for the motor not going to be a everyday driver just weekends..
 
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