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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone. I’m looking at a 66 barracuda and I live in Phoenix we’re in the summer 100+ is normal everyday so in my opinion AC is pretty important. Now I have two big options. Underdash or integrated. underdash doesn’t give me the power to dehumidify the air for a defroster. Is this necessary for it to work properly?
 

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Good question and good debate, it wasn't until recently that the dehumidify option came about, the heater did its job, the AC did its job. Phoenix has very low humidity to begin with, the older cars didn't reverse the AC to have instant defrost back in the day, and with low humidity, defrost isn't needed that much to begin with, crack a window edge and you have instant flow for that being an issue. Another thing is, can or do you have a located AC dash for the vents to replace your non-AC dash to have the integration? Can't imagine them being that available, but hey, sometimes the strangest things show up at the right time.
 

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Hey everyone. I’m looking at a 66 barracuda and I live in Phoenix we’re in the summer 100+ is normal everyday so in my opinion AC is pretty important. Now I have two big options. Underdash or integrated. underdash doesn’t give me the power to dehumidify the air for a defroster. Is this necessary for it to work properly?
You are probably thinking that an integrated air conditioning system allows for warm, dehumidified air to be directed onto the inside, lower windshield area. This would seem to be more advantageous of keeping the windshield clear of fog / moisture accumulation versus an underneath, hang on unit which only recirculates dehumidified air.

In practical terms I have found on my minivan with an integrated heat / A C system that running the mode on floor or bi-level (not defrost) at a warm comfort level with A C compressor engaged provides the best dehumidification. Dry air circulating at the floor and mid-zone level in the cabin will remove any fog on the inside windshield and side windows much more quickly than concentrated dry air placed at the base of the windshield. An underneath hang on dash unit would provide just as good moisture removal as the integrated unit.

So it really is an issue of aesthetics. Do you like the integrated look or want the aftermarket, hang on look?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I don’t really care about looks much. In fact I like the $ of the underdash unit as it’s more friendly for a high school budget. I worked at an AC shop so installing it shouldn’t be an issue. Now I’m still not sure if I can get this car I’m trying too. It needs a lot of work. Luckily I can do all of it. My dads car I fixed up for him was a 78 lil red express truck. That thing needed everything from entire cooling system to driveline. Anyways I love old mopar a and will post back here if I get this Cuda. My current classic is a 64 ford (I know not mopar ). Falcon. Thanks for for the help guys.
 

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Chrysler introduced reheat (integrated dehumidifying) systems in the 1950s, not exactly recent. GM did the same about the same time. Ford continued to use separate systems into the late 1970s. The underdash outlet on A bodies was still a reheat system, just didn't have indash outlets.

Reheat systems are far better if you live in an area with any humidity. Probably not that necessary where you live and reheats will be both more expensive and more difficult to install. I put an underdash aftermarket in a 65 Dart in 1972. Quite easy install, cooled very well. You may not need more radiator as they were pretty good stock, although with the heat you have it would probably be a good idea anyway, but you will definitely need more fan.
 
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