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Yes. I believe you need snap ring pliers to get the clip out.
 

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Hi,

It would help you to have a shop manual to see what is involved in removing the clutch. You can use the belt tension and engine load to keep the clutch from turning to remove the clutch retaining nut. You will need apuller to remove the front clutch plate and as Bob said a snap ring pliers to remove the whole clutch assembly from the compressor. I should ask why you need to remove the clutch. If the clutch itself is bad or the front shaft seal of the compressor is leaking you will likely find it about as cost effective to replace the whole compressor. The price of a replacement clutch comes close to the cost of a compressor.
 

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He may still have R-12 and not want to lose the refrigerant charge.
 

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As a side note, the clutches usually go bad because the compressor front seal seeps refrigerant oil and eventually causes the clutch plates to slip. Once they start slipping, the hub overheats destroying the hub bearing over time.

You can get a complete kit with the clutch plate, pulley, hub bearing, and clutch coil..... but if the front seal has been seeping, your work and investment will be wasted, since the same problem will occur over a few months period. I've been there and done that.

One time I had a hub totally lock up on the Interstate. For the first few moments, I didn't know what was going on as I heard horrible screaching sounds followed by smoke and an acrid burning smell. When I got the hood opened, the clutch hub was cherry red and belt (amazingly not broken yet) was smoking and smelled bad. I simply cut the belt with a knife and went on my way. You couldn't do that on a 3.3/3.8 since there is not a seperate AC belt.

Unless you are dead sure the compressor seal is holding (you have to disassemble to find out), I would replace the entire compressor. Also, avoid 4 Seasons, and Factory Air rebuilt compressors. That is what most chain stores sell and they have a bad reputation.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The clutch started making alot of noise, took the belt off and you could feel the clutch binding when disengaged. The car has R134 in it so that is not a problem. What year compressor fits this car I was thinking of going to a wrecking yard and finding a good one ( I am cheap) pulling the old and replacing is no problem for me.
 

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What engine do you have? You probably can go 2-3 years forward with the same engine. There should be a tag on the old compressor with the model # on it (probably on the end of the unit).
 

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can the clutch on the a/c be removed and if it can do you need any special tools ?
Chrysler used the C171 compressor as standard issue with factory air conditioning systems in 1987. To remove the AC clutch (which can be done with the system charged with refrigerant) you have to remove a 13 mm nut on the compressor shaft and then use snap ring pliers to remove an internal snap ring. There are threads on the inside surface of the exterior clutch plate that mate with a special puller and allow the clutch plate to be removed. You could check an auto parts store and its loaner tools and maybe find the special puller. Don't attempt to use a hammer or screw drivers as a pry removing tool. Once the exterior clutch plate is removed there is another snap ring that holds the clutch electromagnetic coil to the AC compressor body.

You probably have either the 2.2 liter or 2.5 liter 4 cylinder engine as the power plant in your New Yorker. Starting in 1991 Chrysler phased in the usage of a Denso compressor in anticipation of the switch from R12 refrigerant to R134a refrigerant. I would suggest upgrading the compressor to the Denso type. You need to locate a 1991 - 1995 Acclaim, Spirit, Sundance, or Shadow with AC and the 2.5 liter 4 cylinder to find the correct parts. 1991 was the transition year so you need to make sure the donor vehicle is using the Denso compressor and not the C171.

To use the Denso compressor you will need the engine mounting bracket, belt pulley idler bracket, belt pulley idler, and drive belt. On 4 cylinder engines the AC drive belt for the Denso compressor was 1 inch shorter in overall length than the drive belt used with 4 cylinder engines on the C171 compressor.

You will also need the suction and discharge hoses from the Denso compressor as the mounting boss for each hose to the compressor suction and discharge ports are different from the C171 compressor. The suction hose mounting at the expansion valve and the discharge hose mounting at the condenser are the same between the 2 different compressors.

Also keep in mind that through the 1993 model year the Denso compressor had the suction port on the compressor manifold head. Starting with 1994 models the suction port was moved to the suction line. You have to watch this or you can end up with a configuration of year mis-matched hoses and Denso compressor with no suction port and capability of charging refrigerant into the system.

These were the issues I encountered in changing a C171 compressor on a 1989 Plymouth Acclaim to a Denso compressor retrieved from a 1993 Acclaim. Retrofitting a later model compressor is doable but not quite as simple as one would think.
 

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I made the same change on my 91 Sundance which still had the C171 compressor and ran into the same thing when I put in a used 1994 R134a Denso compressor. I had to go back to the junk yard and retrieve a compressor manifold from a R12 1992 vehicle that had the suction port. Your description of the change over is right on the money including the shorter belt requirement.

Actually, there are still a lot of C171 compressors (new and remanufactured) available in the aftermarket. That would be the easiest solution, even though the Denso compressor is a better unit IMHO.

I also should mention that the 1991 model year AP vehicles (Sundance and Shadows) had not switched over to the Denso compressors. That was done in 1992.


To OP:
If you pull up the PDF at this link, it will tell you a lot about your compressor including how to replace the clutch plates:

https://www.google.c...NVFKMEiJQiPtkcQ
 
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