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Like Imperial noted it was back in the '60's and early '70's. When unleaded fuel became mandatory, those pumps disappeared. Eventually full service went away as well, except in NJ and OR.
In MA, some towns ban self-serve, such as Milford. So local jurisdiction can apply, too.

Some of them require all the cars to face the same way at the pumps, or the operator will shut off the pump on a vehicle facing the wrong way. The reasoning (faulty, I believe) is that they want all cars to pull away in the same direction in case of a fire. Well, in case of a fire erupting, if you are outside your vehicle, you'd better run fast, as there will be no time to abandon the hose, get in, start it up and drive away without being burned.
 

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There are a number of gas stations in my area that sell no-ethanol premium (91 or 93 octane) mainly to cater to boaters. So if I mix 87 E10 with 91 no-ethanol 50/50, I get 89 octane with 5% ethanol. At these stations, the mid -grade is labeled as up to 10% ethanol so I don't think they are mixing at the pump. . .
I gather than the problem of ethanol in gasoline for boaters was inboard (fiberglass/epoxy?) fuel tanks which were softened by the ethanol and then leaked. Is that correct? Presumably it is not the engine itself.

I wonder if ethanol-free gasoline works better than 10% ethanol in those aircraft engines (e.g., Rotax) designed for auto gasoline (called "mogas" as opposed to 100 LL avgas). ROTAX 912 914 fuel use operation | Sport Airplane Pilot Hub | Sport Aviation Center | Paul Hamilton (at http://airplanepilot.sportaviationcenter.com/light-sport-planes/maintenance-inspections/rotax-fuel/ )

What is the cost of ethanol-free gasoline compared to the 10% ethanol?
 

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Virginia Gentleman
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I gather than the problem of ethanol in gasoline for boaters was inboard (fiberglass/epoxy?) fuel tanks which were softened by the ethanol and then leaked. Is that correct? Presumably it is not the engine itself.

I wonder if ethanol-free gasoline works better than 10% ethanol in those aircraft engines (e.g., Rotax) designed for auto gasoline (called "mogas" as opposed to 100 LL avgas). ROTAX 912 914 fuel use operation | Sport Airplane Pilot Hub | Sport Aviation Center | Paul Hamilton (at http://airplanepilot.sportaviationcenter.com/light-sport-planes/maintenance-inspections/rotax-fuel/ )

What is the cost of ethanol-free gasoline compared to the 10% ethanol?
Until recently non-ethanol fuel (87 octane) was 40-50 CTS higher. Right now E10 87 octane is 2.339 and non-ethanol 87 octane is 2.439.
 

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I gather than the problem of ethanol in gasoline for boaters was inboard (fiberglass/epoxy?) fuel tanks which were softened by the ethanol and then leaked. Is that correct? Presumably it is not the engine itself.

I wonder if ethanol-free gasoline works better than 10% ethanol in those aircraft engines (e.g., Rotax) designed for auto gasoline (called "mogas" as opposed to 100 LL avgas). ROTAX 912 914 fuel use operation | Sport Airplane Pilot Hub | Sport Aviation Center | Paul Hamilton (at http://airplanepilot.sportaviationcenter.com/light-sport-planes/maintenance-inspections/rotax-fuel/ )

What is the cost of ethanol-free gasoline compared to the 10% ethanol?
While there are likely still fiberglass gas tanks around, the biggest fear with E10 in boats is phase separation. Unlike cars, the fuel sytems in almost all boats are not sealed from the atmosphere and they are kept in a wet environment. Couple that with the often infrequent use that many boats get, and there is a concern about the buildup of water in the tank.

Ethanol-free gas is usually about 10 cents per gallon more than E10 of the same octane at other stations, sometimes more, but sometimes about the same price.
 

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Virginia Gentleman
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In addition to what Bob posted, the main issue with most recreational boat engines, is they average less than a month of actual running on an annual basis. It mostly has to do with storage. Gasoline can be become "stale" or "sour" over time. Ethanol is very corrosive and many older marine engines and their fuel systems (manufactured before 1990) simply were not designed with E10 in mind. As Bob posted there is the phase separation (If E10 is used) where the ethanol and water separate and form a layer on the bottom of the tank. This usually happens when the fuel sits for a while. The best advice has been to use E0 and when storing the boat for the winter, fill it 95% full (Allow for expansion) with E0 and add a stabilizer, then run the engine for a bit to get the stabilizer completely through the fuel system. Ethanol is known to attack the plastics and rubber in the older fuel systems. A full tank minimizes the formation of condensation (water). Yes, ethanol absorbs water but there is a limit of how much it can absorb. E15 is a definite no-no for marine engines. And yes, I've already observed one station in our region that has E15 available.

Ethanol And Older Engines - Seaworthy Magazine - BoatUS (at https://www.boatus.com/seaworthy/magazine/2012/april/ethanol-and-older-engines.asp )

Ethanol gasoline can pose problem for boat motors (at http://www.charlotteobserver.com/living/home-garden/article97604942.html )

Fishermen beware: ethanol fuel is deadly for outboard motors - AllOutdoor.com (at http://www.alloutdoor.com/2013/06/25/fishermen-beware-ethanol-fuel-deadly-outboard-motors/ )
 
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