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Discussion Starter #1
I have put about 9,000 miles on this car since June, now 124K. . Thanks to this forum, I fixed a hot engine cutout by changing the distributor and crank sensor. No problem since then. The other day, I went to start the car and it cranked but wouldn't fire. I seem to have no spark. This is the first car I have had with digital odometer. I flicked the key three times and did not get any result. Maybe I did something wrong? SO, I bought an inexpensive code reader and got a "NO LINK" reading. Does this mean the PCM is bad or?????
 

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Some scan tools have a hard time reading early OBD II. Try another scan tool if you can.
Make sure that both distributor connectors are secured to the distributor. Make sure that the distributor rotor is turning while cranking.
Check over fuses and any obvious underhood components/connectors being unplugged.
Does your 'ck eng' warning light illuminate with the key on?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
No check engine light. I sold my old "brick" because I didn't think I needed it I will try and borrow another scanner.

I parked it in my spot, went to go out the next day. and it just cranked.. Pulled a plug wire and got no spark. Will check all the fuses as soon as our "Frankenstorm" is over.

Thanks as usual
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Now I'm really in a bind with this car. Thinking it was OBDII, I originally bought a cheap scanner that obviously wouldn't read it. Now I have a better unit: Autoxray 5000 that reads OBD I and II, but not this car as it apparently is a one off oddball. I have both OBD II and GM OBDI cables (config OBDII) and I get no reading. I am stranded 2 weeks tomorrow. I get no check engine light, no spark. What's the possibility the aftermarket BWD crank sensor has gone bad again in 9,000 miles? I would need to have AAA tow the car 50 miles to a friends to work on it. Once there, if that is not it, I am really in a mess Thanks Again.
 

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Not a solution, but...in your searching for a solution, don't just look for Cirrus and Stratus with the 2.5L V6 - check Avenger and Sebring as well - pretty much the same engine with just minor differences (like manifolds).
 

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Avenger and Sebring (and Talon) were DiamondStar (Mitsubishi) body wiring/diagnostic connector(s) . Is there a 2nd underdash diagnostic connector near the OBD 2 data link connector? This may be above the gas pedal area and rectangular in shape.
Can you find an OEM crank sensor to try?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
TY I C You are invaluable. The OBD II connector is by the kick panel/hood release, I will look for the other one. I will buy an OEM, but I have the replacement and it is free. My problem is working on it. I am in the parking lot of my apartment and can't work on it there.
 

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If the 'ck eng' light doesn't even come on for a bulb-check when the key is turned on to 'run', there is another problem. A power or ground or a short-to-ground in either of the 5 or 8 volt sensor supply lines will put a 'good' PCM into protection instead of the possibility of damaging it. It will also keep the vehicle from starting and from communicating with your scan tool.
I checked the 1995 Powertrain Diagnostic Procedures book and there should be just the one OBD2 DLC underdash connector for domestic JA (Cirus, Stratus and Breeze) vehicles. The FJ DiamondStars had the 2 underdash scan tool connectors and a DRB adapter was needed to access the DiamondStar/Mitsubishi PCM.
If you Google for issues reading fault codes and connecting to PCM's on 1995 OBD2 vehicles, you will find more information.

while earlier poster is correct that OBDII was not available untill 96
some 95 had it. Try coding your car as a 96 not 95. That is what I
(and the dealer) do on my 95 Neon.




This chapter explains how to test 1994–later OBD-II vehicles. Most vehicles are equipped with
two testing modes: Generic OBD-II and Enhanced OBD-II. The EPA requires all 1996–later
vehicles sold in the USA to meet OBD-II standards.
Some 1994–95 vehicles may appear to be OBD-II equipped, they may not be fully compliant.
Check the VECI label to determine if a 1994–95 vehicle is an OBD-I or OBD-II model.
The following information and procedures are specific testing in Generic OBD-II mode. For
general scan tool testing information, see the user’s manual for your diagnostic tool.

Many aftemarket/generic OBD2 scan tools had trouble reading these early OBD2 vehicles. The DRB III would be certain to get into the PCM (if it has the ability to communicate) and find the problem. I hate to suggest a tow and diagnostic by the dealer, but it may give you your answer.
 

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I have not had good success with non-oem crank sensors for these motors. I had one that was causing misfires
right outof the box. Replaced it with a dealer sensor and no more problems. Rarely does a failed crank sensor
throw a diagnostic code. My suggestion is to replace the crank sensor.

Hope this helps,

Gerry G.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I am going to bite the bullet and buy a PCM. I bought another car, but still need to get this running. The big issue seems to be if I have or don't have firm feel suspension/steering How do I tell if I have it and will a computer made for it work if I don't? Without firm feel they are twice the price for some reason. I still have some hair left, but not much!
 

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"I flicked the key three times and did not get any result."It's not clear to me that you performed this correctly. To read codes with the key, you turn the ignition to ON, then OFF, then ON, then OFF and then ON - and *leave* it on the third time. You should see a Check Engine light and also some message on the digital odometer. If the Check Engine light flashes, you count the pulses, keeping in mind that they are two-digit codes, so there will be a number of flashes, short pause, more flashes, then a slightly longer pause before the next two-digit sequence.Please try this again before buying a PCM.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I tried getting a code with no luck. Nothing is easy. The battery was dead and the car was in a spot where I couldn't reach the terminals with jumper cables. Finally I got it moved. Turned the key to both on positions for the sequence specified. The first position did not show the box around the transmission position, the second did. still no codes following the instructions. BTW: The check engine light comes on as a check, but goes right out when the key is left on.

My question on this computer is I have found a remanufactured one at Advance Auto for $170 Does this have to be programmed? If so, how? Only a dealer! :-( Also back to the original question Does it matter about the steering/suspension control? Computers without the provision are much more expensive.

Thanks again for your help.
 

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Any fault codes would have been erased with a dead battery. Some cars can't do the key-dance and can only be accessed by a scan tool, which hasn't been easy yet either.
I would really hate to condemn the PCM and not have that be the problem. Replacing it at this point is a gamble as I don't think that it can be returned after trying it. It could be programmed with the VIN and mileage, but these aren't necessary to have it run the engine. I don't know if your Cirrus has the speed proportional steering or not. I may be able to tell with the last 8 of the VIN. Is there a small black, plastic module with a 4 or 5 wire connector going to where the power steering lines go into the rack? Not to be mistaken for the 2-wire connector is the p/s pressure switch that they all have.
The dealer DRB is the only tool that I can think of that might produce a more confident diagnosis that would lead to a one-shot answer and save you money in the long run...or not.
Do you have the 5 or 8 volt power supply from the PCM to the crank sensor supply terminal with the key on?
 

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russ300h said:
Turned the key to both on positions for the sequence specified. The first position did not show the box around the transmission position, the second did. still no codes following the instructions.  BTW: The check engine light comes on as a check, but goes right out when the key is left on.
It's confusing to me what you did, but I think you did the sequence wrong. You should turn the key to ON, back to OFF, then ON, then OFF and then leave it ON, *all within 5 seconds*. If you delay this ON-OFF sequence too much in any position, you do not get the codes flashing. The fact that the bulb lights does indicate that it's working and probably communicating. Please try it again.
 

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The 1st key position from off may be an 'unlock' and not really an 'off' position. Try it in both combinations, sweeping the key past unlock to off and back to run 3 times within 5 seconds. Then unlock to run 3 times.
If anything shows up, it may be by the flashing 'ck eng' lamp or P-codes in the digital odometer.
A cluster self-test may also produce a code. With the ign off, press and hold in the trip odometer reset button, then roll the key to on and release the button. The gauges and VF digit segments should do their little dance. Watch for any codes in the odo display during and after the test.
If nothing comes up, then I have to think that the DRB is the answer for fault codes?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Just a dumb thought Can I remove the computer and bring it somewhere to be tested? If so, probably a dealer, but soemwhere else maybe?
 

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Probably not. Did you perform the code test again?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
yes nothing does this suspension option matter to just get the car running?
 
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