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Is this the engine where the distributor wiring runs under the intake manifold? There were problems with those due to chaffed wiring.
Agreed, this is a good area to look. In fact, you might also check the wiring coming off the sensors, the alternator, and just about everywhere else, for frays. This can be time-consuming, so patience is required. I had a similar problem on a Dakota (hot stalling immediately after starting, but not while driving) that was caused by a frayed wire near the connector to the throttle position sensor. A butt splice fixed it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
So I did a test on the tps to really see what’s going on . Showed 5 at rest and 7.7 with the acc on and 8.5 at idle. So Because I seen what I assume is low volts I put a spacer on the throttle cable and brought it up to 90v then when I started the car it went up to 1.02 . And a code came up as high idle. I did notice rough idle but a think that’s because I put a spacer . I removed it and it back to 8.5 . So far that’s what I got . Next is the crank sensor.
 

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These readings are bogus. The TPS voltage is about 0.7 volts at idle, increasing linearly to about 4.0 volts at wide open throttle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
So I did a test on the tps to really see what’s going on . Showed 5 at rest and 7.7 with the acc on and 8.5 at idle. So Because I seen what I assume is low volts I put a spacer on the throttle cable and brought it up to 90v then when I started the car it went up to 1.02 . And a code came up as high idle. I did notice rough idle but a think that’s because I put a spacer . I removed it and it back to 8.5 . So far that’s what I got . Next is the crank sensor.
These readings are bogus. The TPS voltage is about 0.7 volts at idle, increasing linearly to about 4.0 volts at wide open throttle.
Oops that’s .77 rest . .85 at idle . And when wot it’s 3.75
 

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Oops that’s .77 rest . .85 at idle . And when wot it’s 3.75
So, a final test would be to read the voltage while sweeping the throttle through its range (with key on, engine off). If there are no unusual spikes along the way, the TPS is good.
 

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My observations are based on having a '97 Sebring and a '99 Cirrus. The 2.5l does not like to set codes for stalling issues and makes trouble-shooting difficult.

If the stalling problem occurs only when coming to a stop, I would suspect the IAC. I have found it is not really possible to clean the IAC so a replacement is likely in order. I would not suspect the TPS at this time.

If the stalling occurs at other times, I would suspect the crankshaft position sensor or the camshaft position sensor (part of the distributor). The fact that no codes are showing points to the crank position sensor as it is responsible to detect misfires and set codes.

If replacing the distributor, cardone is the most reliable. If replacing the crank position sensor, use OEM only. I have had numerous problems with auto part store units.

Once the stalling issue is resolved, then move on to the 'odd self acceleration' issue.
 

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If you suspect the distributor (and you should), spray a fine mist of water on it when the engine is running.
It'll probably stall and send sparks all over the outside of the housing, indicating you need to replace it.
The distributor cap is also suspect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
So far I have just replaced the iac and after 6 minutes it stalled in the drive way . After that once up to temp it’s fine ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Also is it normal for this car to take a whale to warm up ?i notice that even after 10 it still was under temp
 

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mechanic says timing chain ?
Time for a new mechanic? It’s got a timing belt, not a timing chain. What makes the mechanic suspect the timing chain/belt?
 

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1966 Crown Coupe, 2016 200 S AWD, 1962 Lark Daytona V8.
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The 2.5L is an interference engine with 4 valves per cylinder. The replacement interval is every 102K miles.
This is a belt that you do not want to see fail, but I doubt that is your stalling issue.

The 2.5L is a dual-poppet thermostat. If the coolant level is OK, I would replace the thermostat. I had to replace the one in mine because my heater was only lukewarm.
 
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There are two sensors and two circuits that can (and often do) kill this car like that without leaving any codes. The CKP (Crank Position Sensor), the CMP (Cam Position Sensor), the ASD (Auto-Shutdown) circuit, and the ground circuit.

CKP and CMP are tested by process of elimination and replaced as required. Losing either one of these will activate the ASD relay and cut fuel and spark to the engine. This circuit is responsible for most "Crank, No Start" and "stalling" issues. The CKP is the most common individual component to fail, but the CMP, ASD relay, and wiring can also cause issues. The flexplate and timing belt can also cause issues with this circuit; you should at least inspect the timing belt to see how tight it is and note any wear. (Though if it jumps a tooth you'll have bigger issues than stalling.)

The final circuit that can cause these issues is the ground circuit, and on these cars, there is an odd issue that can occur and is very easy to fix. The negative battery post on the strut tower has TWO nuts on it. The top nut secures the ground cable from the battery to the post by pressing it against the lower nut. The lower nut secures the post and the main wiring harness ground straps to the strut tower. The upper nut can be tight against the lower nut while the lower nut is loose; this could allow the wiring harness (and PCM) to lose connection and can/will cause a weak ground for the whole car. To remove this issue from consideration, remove BOTH nuts and all harnesses, clean the post and terminals, and reinstall tightly.

I have the full FSM and Diagnostic Procedures Manual for a 2000 Sebring Convertible (which is basically the same car) and I also have way too much experience working on these things; let me know what I can do to help.
 

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Regarding the "warm-up issue", this car has a fail-safe t-stat design. When it fails, it allows full circulation. This greatly extends the time it takes to "warm-up."

BUT, that's usually not the issue. The coolant temperature sensor is prone to failure and will indicate a cold engine when in fact the engine is fine. Additionally, a low-coolant condition can cause a false "cold" reading.

The cooling system on these cars is hard to "burp". Checking the overflow tank isn't enough. When cool, remove the radiator cap and check the coolant level. If you can't see it in the neck, it's low. Top it off, warm it up, then check it again after it's cooled.

Assuming the coolant level is good, you can check to see if the sensor is failed easily by driving the car for a while and touching both radiator hoses. If one is noticeably warmer than the other, your thermostat is fine and your sensor is bad. If both are cool, the thermostat is bad and sensor is likely okay.

BOTH of these issues can cause drivability issues, BTW (but they shouldn't cause stalling). The engine will run rich when it is cold in an attempt to warm the engine. Eventually, it will trigger the CEL...
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
My money is on the distributor. Since alot of you guys say it’s a huge issue with the stalling . Next to the crank sensor. And the car throws no codes , that’s annoying as hell by the way .
 
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