Allpar Forums banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
411 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This weekend I want to get a pallet full of goods that weighs 2400 lbs. Is this pushing it for a six mile trip? The thing is there's a forklift to load a full pallet. Half a pallet would need to be loaded, unloaded, loaded, unload and that would be ok if I was twenty five.
Thanks
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,365 Posts
[sub]Personally I wouldn't risk it on a 14 year old truck.[/sub]
[sub]I have no idea on the condition of the frame, brakes, suspension, steering, tires or road conditions.[/sub]
[sub]1/2 ton = 1000 lbs. 2400 lbs is almost 2 1/2 times the safe loading weight rating![/sub]
[sub]If something were to let loose, it could cause liabilities and the handling may be uncontrollable in a demanding maneuver.[/sub]
[sub]Borrow, rent or hire a HD truck for the job.[/sub]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
682 Posts
2,400 lb is too much in the truck bed. If you can get a trailer to load 'em onto you can haul it just fine.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Doug D

·
Virginia Gentleman
Joined
·
14,683 Posts
Safety first!

Your payload is only 1,000 lbs or so - that's why it's a 1/2 ton truck. If it were a 2500 HD truck I'd say no problem. I've hauled ~1,500 lbs with my '06 1500 for a short distance (about 4-5 miles).

How about borrowing or renting a trailer? 2400 lbs should be well under your max tow rating. It would also be easier to load/unload. Do you have a hitch? Even a bumper hitch will do for this as your tongue weight would only be about 250-300 lbs and a bumper hitch can usually handle up to 500 lb tongue weight.

Do you know what the GVWR is for your truck? It should be on the placard on the door. The payload is the GVWR minus the curb weight of the truck and passengers. For example the GVWR for mine is 6750 lbs. My truck without the driver, passengers and no cargo is 5100 lbs so the net difference is 6700-5100 = 1,600 lbs then subtract my weight (~200 lbs) so in theory I could go as high as 1400 lbs if I carried no passengers. Your truck is probably similar so 2400 lbs would be exceeding max payload by 1,000 lbs or so. Even a short distance with the much overweight is questionable. Remember it's not just the engine and transmission, but brakes and suspension as well. Could it do it? Probably, but you would be well over any safety margins and if there is an accident, you could be cited for being overweight.

If it were me, I'd find a suitable trailer. You'd probably need a double axle trailer and they can be rented from U-Haul for about $20-$30 for the day. 2400 lbs really is pushing it - even for a short distance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
411 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
All good points, thank you. Think I'll try to get some help. That would be cheaper.
Thanks again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
682 Posts
Optimal solution: rent a trailer. Next best? Rent a 3500 Series truck for a day.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,079 Posts
Put 50psi in the tires, recognize it will be a little light in the front end, and as long as you know the truck and know its mechanical condition, 6 miles is only a mile longer than I drove my 95 Dakota seven times with a pallet of 46 53 lb bricks (on a pallet) without any difficulty. I drove carefully, drove down a steep dirt road/alley that is 500 feet long, but, doing two trips would be safer if at all possible, depending on what you are hauling. If the tires are good, shouldn't have a problem.
 
  • Like
Reactions: awyseguy

·
Registered
Joined
·
570 Posts
From driving Dakotas for almost 15 years.. I would like to start by pointing out that very few 1/2T trucks are only rated to carry that 1000 lbs. According to http://www.edmunds.com/dodge/ram-pickup-1500/1998/features-specs.html?style=10389 That truck could have had a 2300 pound payload.. Which is actually believable; at 250,000 miles; my only concern putting 2400 lbs on the back of my Dakota would be tire condition.. It has carried as much as 3100 lbs in the past; but that did leave the steering a bit light.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
411 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
From driving Dakotas for almost 15 years.. I would like to start by pointing out that very few 1/2T trucks are only rated to carry that 1000 lbs. According to http://www.edmunds.com/dodge/ram-pickup-1500/1998/features-specs.html?style=10389 That truck could have had a 2300 pound payload.. Which is actually believable; at 250,000 miles; my only concern putting 2400 lbs on the back of my Dakota would be tire condition.. It has carried as much as 3100 lbs in the past; but that did leave the steering a bit light.
I was reading a couple old posts of mine and have something to add here. Last fall I hauled a pallet full of coal, 2000 lbs, about 40 miles. We drove home on back roads,35mph, nice and easy without a problem. A worker at the coal dealer said people overload their trucks all the time. Next time I think we'll make it in two trips tho, 1 ton was pushing it.
 

·
Virginia Gentleman
Joined
·
14,683 Posts
Seems like the Dakota is every bit as capable carrying a load as the 1500?
I believe they are very similar in payload capacity. Theoretically, I could carry up to 1400 lbs in my 1500 with just me in the cab. Payload is determined by the difference between the gross vehicle weight rating and the curb weight of the vehicle - subtract driver and any passengers to obtain the safe payload.

Just because people overload their trucks "all the time" doesn't make it safe or legal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,689 Posts
2400 pounds? Only 6 miles? Hell, I've had that back of my '97 at times, for longer durations. Check your tires, go slow, stay out of overdrive (maybe even shift to "2" to limit the truck to 1st and 2nd), and brake early! I'd be the most worried about brakes. Second most about tires. You might be sitting on the bump stops, so expect a rough ride and avoid uneven ground, as there won't be any give. You should be okay if you aware that you're pushing it, and treat everything as so...

Or, find a trailer. Trailering the load would be the best solution.
 

·
Virginia Gentleman
Joined
·
14,683 Posts
Jerry - it's still not legal. Doesn't matter if it 6 miles or 600 miles.

In that situation, I would agree on renting or somehow obtaining a trailer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,689 Posts
I'm not sure about that. It's a pickup, not a commercial vehicle. The trip is not for commercial gain. Etc. Besides, to be fined, they'd have to weigh you, which means you have to pass a DOT scale or they have to have a mobile one. The legality of this operation is the last thing I'd have on my mind. The demands on the truck would be much more of a concern for me.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,365 Posts
I would be more concerned with the safety of the other motorists using the public highway.
A mechanical breakdown can hurt or kill people. Or simply just being unable to stop or maneuver an overladen or unsafely loaded vehicle in an unexpected emergency situation.
If a violator gets ticketed and fined even when no accident has occurred, that is OK by me.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
31,989 Posts
It's stupid and inconsiderate of others' safety to overload any vehicle. A Dakota can tow that weight, but not carry it as a payload. Trailer it or have it delivered, or make multiple trips. And you most certainly can be cited for it, and prosecuted if anything happens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
628 Posts
My biggest concern would be liability in event of a collision. A ticket/breakdown will have limited consequences. Pay the fine, fix the rig, your insurance may go up. But that's it.

Found liable for someone's injury/death......morally and to a lessor extent, financially..... is it worth it to save a trip?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
628 Posts
I would be more concerned with the safety of the other motorists using the public highway.
A mechanical breakdown can hurt or kill people. Or simply just being unable to stop or maneuver an overladen or unsafely loaded vehicle in an unexpected emergency situation.
If a violator gets ticketed and fined even when no accident has occurred, that is OK by me.

Very much agree.

I have some experience hauling heavy loads......in a collision......ANY question of overloading will be investigated by commercial enforcement inspectors in my state. A very thorough inspection. And if it's a weighed load.....no tolerance.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top