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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm doing my own alignment. There's an issue of a slight pull to the right, not too bad but I prefer not to have to push slightly left on the steering wheel all the time. It takes about 3 seconds on the freeway for it to start wandering over the line if I just let go of the wheel (one of the standard alignment tests)

Normal driving on cambered roads, so first of all I should probably reduce the camber on the right wheel slightly. The front wheels are at about 0.6° positive camber and 0.14° toe in.

Also, I've noticed the left rear is about -1.6° camber the right is about -0.6. Is there something I can do I n the front to compensate for this or does the rear camber even matter? the only way I can change it is to replace the 3rd member or take it off and bend or something, unless there's such a thing as shimming where the spindle bolts to it? The left rear bearing has been a little bit noisy for years ever since I got the car, now I believe this may be why.
 

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There are shims for the rear suspension to correct issues there.
 
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. . . .I'm doing my own alignment. There's an issue of a slight pull to the right, not too bad but I prefer not to have to push slightly left on the steering wheel all the time. It takes about 3 seconds on the freeway for it to start wandering over the line if I just let go of the wheel (one of the standard alignment tests) . . . .
I would suggest exchaning wheels at the front (LF to RF; RF to LF) and test again. Sometimes radial tires will wear in such a fashion to cause a slight pull to one side. If pull disappears or moves in the opposite direction, then side pull is atributable to tires and not necessarily suspension alignment specifications.
 

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1966 Crown Coupe, 2016 200 S AWD, 1962 Lark Daytona V8.
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On the assembly line, robots set the wheel alignment. This 'net build' will slide the crossmember around until the cross-camber & cross-caster is within specs. Build tolerances, for the most part is within a mm.
If the cross member is loosened or removed anytime during the vehicle's life, it is very important to put it back where it was. I do this by lining up the bolt washer marks (the holes are slightly slotted to allow adjustment).
If Caster or Camber is off, look for bent or worn parts.
Tire cross-switching (left to right) is allowed, even with radial tires to negate a 'pull'. All tires have some degree of 'conicity'. Swapping wheel positions can negate this.

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I replaced the original rims and tires a couple months ago. The used but near new condition tires and rims behaved exactly the same.

Tire Wheel Car Land vehicle Vehicle

I've now adjusted the left rear with a 1-1/4° shim as it was the only thing out of spec and adjusted the front camber a little less, close to 0.4° each side, feels better, still goes slightly left or right on canted roads but I believe it is where I want it in normal range, however, I may still tweak the front camber maybe to zero or 1/16° negative to get better cornering sometime in the future.
 

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1/8 negative and zero toe works on almost anything. Certainly works well on all FWD Chrysler products. I've been using that on minivans for 25 years. Wears tires flat, improves steering response, has no adverse tracking effects.
 

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You could try to increase caster angle, that will increase its straight line stability but itll make it harder to turn.
- try to find a copy of the "green brick valiant" build by Richard Ehrenberg. Its amazing what they did with a valiants roadholding capabilities.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
That 1/8 negative makes sense bc of the way the control arms operate, I've noticed these 80s and older chryslers some of them tend to really lean in the turns. Since we're on the subject, maybe a strut bar would help? Just a thought, idk if I would actually fabricate one
 

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KOG
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You could try to increase caster angle, that will increase its straight line stability but itll make it harder to turn.
- try to find a copy of the "green brick valiant" build by Richard Ehrenberg. Its amazing what they did with a valiants roadholding capabilities.
Caster is NOT adjustable on any of the FWD strut suspensions. I also have a Valiant with some front suspension mods ala Green Brick.
 
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