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DO NOT FEED THE TROLLS!
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Curtis Redgap said:
Partially.........more that Iaccoca felt it was the wrong car sending the wrong message at the time.
Sad thing of it is, the GM and Ford competitors lived for a very long time. A buddy of mine, after driving my '95 Impala, lamented Chrysler discontinuing his St. Regis so early. Had they kept it and continued development, Chrysler could have had an equivalent to the Impala SS or the Mercury Marauder in the nineties as opposed to waiting until 2005 for the 300 to come out.

The Impala has a lot of faults, even lowered compared to the Caprice and given sportier suspension it still wallows through the turns, and its fuel economy ranges between 15mpg and 18mpg depending on how aggressively I'm driving, but it's a very comfortable car for the mostly straight-line driving that my commute requires. The Cordoba I have that I used to drive daily was the same way as far as comfort, and I expect that the St. Regis was similar given their shared suspensions and similar wheelbases.
 

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TWX said:
Sad thing of it is, the GM and Ford competitors lived for a very long time. A buddy of mine, after driving my '95 Impala, lamented Chrysler discontinuing his St. Regis so early. Had they kept it and continued development, Chrysler could have had an equivalent to the Impala SS or the Mercury Marauder in the nineties as opposed to waiting until 2005 for the 300 to come out.

The Impala has a lot of faults, even lowered compared to the Caprice and given sportier suspension it still wallows through the turns, and its fuel economy ranges between 15mpg and 18mpg depending on how aggressively I'm driving, but it's a very comfortable car for the mostly straight-line driving that my commute requires. The Cordoba I have that I used to drive daily was the same way as far as comfort, and I expect that the St. Regis was similar given their shared suspensions and similar wheelbases.
TWX: I agree with you but between Chrysler between being in a world of hurt ca. 1979-81 and the very slow sales of the R body, something had to give. What also didn't help the R body's cause was the F-M-J platform family still being extant.
 

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Not disagreeing with anything either of you are saying. Iaccoca was given a fully loaded "R" body Chrysler when he arrived at the company as the new CEO. He did not like it, rejecting it out of hand from the first day. Later on when addressing the now infamous "rejects per 100 cars" that was projected for the "K" platform, he was incensed! That........ is when he also found that the percentage of rejects for the "R" body had been floating along at a percentage HIGHER than the robitically built "K" cars. He lit up like an out of control blow torch. Already not liking the "R" it simply sealed the doom of it by poor build quality. Failing sales was but a symptom of the already entrenched public perception. Fleet sales are by no means any measure of success of a particular car. They are but a small percentage of the overall sales needed to make a vehicle a viable commercial gain. Chrysler fleet had a very annoying and particularly aggravating attitude of ignoring complaints........as well as complete indifference to getting engineering changes to fix anything, despite heated interjections to them. Again, endorsing what Dave Zatz has said over the years; "that Chrysler must have built pretty good cars, despite themselves ........ because they were always shooting themselves in the foot."
 

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TWX said:
Sad thing of it is, the GM and Ford competitors lived for a very long time. A buddy of mine, after driving my '95 Impala, lamented Chrysler discontinuing his St. Regis so early. Had they kept it and continued development, Chrysler could have had an equivalent to the Impala SS or the Mercury Marauder in the nineties as opposed to waiting until 2005 for the 300 to come out.

The Impala has a lot of faults, even lowered compared to the Caprice and given sportier suspension it still wallows through the turns, and its fuel economy ranges between 15mpg and 18mpg depending on how aggressively I'm driving, but it's a very comfortable car for the mostly straight-line driving that my commute requires. The Cordoba I have that I used to drive daily was the same way as far as comfort, and I expect that the St. Regis was similar given their shared suspensions and similar wheelbases.
In the 1973 model year, Chrysler took a decided turn to "softer" suspensions, and "mushy" feeling Torqueflites. There was a very discernible difference in operation of our 72 Fury and Polara pursuit models and the 73 Fury that we got in the state bid. There was no real engineering reasoning for this, other than trying to appeal to the Chevrolet/Ford crowd. It didn't work. The '74 models, decidedly redesigned, and junk, did, however, have a better handling suspension, even with the exhaust failing off at every tar strip and concrete slab divider. GM and Ford always had a larger customer base, whereby faults were just accepted by the uninitiated. Not knowing any difference, that, for them, is just the way it is. Fleet managers tend to be a opinionated lot, resistant to changes and yes, subject to keeping as much dollars in their budgets as they can. Moreover, politics can often play hardball in localities obtaining vehicles outside of the "best bang for the buck."

Unfortunately, Chrysler was in a sort of swamp financially with no clue how to drain it for themselves. Development of fleet vehicles was furthest from the minds of engineers. My 75 Cordoba had a 360. It was not an economy job. However, everyone praised it for the ride/handling qualities. I liked the style of it, handling as well. We could get in it, head out, and put 700 miles on it in a day without being or feeling "beat." The oil cartel loved the mileage. Given that, the first '79 Newport we received in fleet service was a suburb handling car. I can not relate it to my Cordoba. Police package suspension on that '79-81 R was even better than the smaller 78 Plymouth we used.
 

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Yup, Rick Ehrenberg has done some articles on upgrading R-bodies to the pre-'73 suspensions ;)

With you on the 'doba.

As to Prius, I am not at all surprised it does well as a taxi. What is really tested as a cab? Well, you have all those starts and stops. Prius uses electric regeneration -- so a lot of braking is done by turning the motors into generators. In NYC they must get over 90 mpg! Then the starts are aided by the motors, saving wear on the transmission (CVT). The batteries would do well without excess cold temps since the cars never cool down much. Suspension parts would be replaced regularly regardless, but I'd think you'd save enough on brake pads and fuel to pay for a lot of other repairs.
 

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Wondering too about the real, real....long term of the Prius. What about the battery life, and replacement costs as well as disposal of the old units? Taxi? Roomy enough? Well, I guess if they are using them..... but still sort of a skeptic.

Standard model upgrades......or for all of them, police and "trailer towing" as well? I know one of our fleet mechanic had an '80 Newport with the 225 slant six and Torqueflite. Nice car! But, a bit mushy especially when compared to the police units he worked on. When a couple of our "R" jobs were involved in wrecks, as total write offs, he made a deal with the Sheriff to capture some suspension bits for his Newport. You could color him very happy after installation! Wish I had that car! Six was surprising in power.
 

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While I was musing..........heh........can afford to do that..... a lot......... we seem to spend too much time focusing on the STATE level of cop cars. The real back bone goes down to the County, Township levels, as well as the big cities. Like Chicago for instance. Ford has a big assembly plant..........and the PD does have the new Taurus & Utility......however, they also have brand new Hemi powered Chargers ........ how many other places in the USA are just like that? You are more likely to see your friendly, local, neighborhood cop than a State type. Get out those cameras and send the shots in!
 

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DO NOT FEED THE TROLLS!
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With its solid steel no-longer-isolator bushings for the front subframe, big antisway bars, big torsion bars, police hangers, and towing package leafsprings, we'll see how the Cordoba handles once it's back together. I don't expect a lot of body roll...
 

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DO NOT FEED THE TROLLS!
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That car will be lucky to see 1,000 miles a year once it's reassembled. Collector's insurance restrictions and all...
 

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DO NOT FEED THE TROLLS!
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Hagerty actually doesn't have a mileage limit, but they do mandate no "business" driving, only pleasure driving or for getting the vehicle serviced. So no commuting, which is where most of my miles go.
 

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Curtis Redgap said:
Will you look at that car..........WOW...........a 2008? With only 118K on it?

Thanks for the story. Sure could use more like it!
118k miles on an island that is 35 miles long and about 6 miles wide at its widest point is a lot of stops and starts but few long trips. Mileage seems correct to me. Probably spent most of its time sitting at the radar traps that are on that island. 20k live in Oakville (also home of a naval air station) out of 58k total.
 

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moparmodelfan said:
Just wait until the AWD Charger police package comes out. It will blow the doors off that Taurus.
Along with a VM 3.0L crd AWD pursuit charger.
Waiting for Management to wake up.
Offering the VM3.0L crd to have a switch, to start with diesel and be able to switch to natural gas for in town use then switch back to diesel for highway use and a combination of both for hard acceleration.

Just like I waited and still waiting for a diesel PT cruiser to be sold in the USA. They could bring back the PT cruiser using the Fiat 500L platform, but there is no desire.
 

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Oh No!! So you mean to tell me all those Movies I watched in the 1980's, didnt use real cop cars?

The Chicago cops didnt chase the good Ol Blues Bros Boys in 1974 Monacos in 1980?

And the LA cops didnt chase Kyle Reese from Terminator with 1978 Plymouths, in 1987!!!

Oh No!!!

Apparently the 70 Coronet squads in 1974's Gone in 60 Seconds were real cops, and cop cars.
So the legend goes.
Dont blow that fantasy on me (not to mention Vanishing Point and Crazy Larry Dirty Mary, surely that 70 Dodge's cop car's top speed was "Unlimited"!!!!)
 
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