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Automated System
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The most popular cars in Europe, by far, are the small hatches, running on little diesels with stick-shifts, which are able to easily make their way through undersized streets and alleys, avoid punitive engine-size taxes, and sip expensive fuel rather than gulping it down. Yet, the most popular Chrysler vehicle in Europe now appears to be the relatively large Fiat Freemont, also known as the Dodge Journey. This fact may be one reason why Fiat allegedly intends to bring over the Dodge Durango, albeit with the smaller 3-liter engine mentioned earlier this week. The timetable for the Durango is uncertain, but it would almost certainly be a niche vehicle, given that it is a moderately high-end vehicle even in the United States, with pricing varying from $29,495 to $39,995 depending on model (without including options). The combination of size, luxurious interior, and relative economy with the eight-speed automatic may..

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American cars had a nice appeal in Europe and I think it's worth to reserve a niche for them in the future. As a matter of fact Chrysler 300, PTT and Dodge Nitro had a little success.
But of course they should keep an eye below the line...
 

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There probably is a market in Europe for the Durango. I've known Europeans who like to tow stuff, and they like American vehicles for that purpose (despite their huge expense there and relative size on tiny, 500 year old streets).

But it makes a whole lot more sense if they stick the Diesel that's going into the Grand Cherokee into it first. I'm hoping that 3.0L imentioned in the news brief s actually a DIESEL 3.0L for Europe...is it as difficult/expensive to certify the diesel in a Durango for Europe as it might be to do the same in the US? Expense is the main reason I've heard that we're NOT getting the diesel in the US Durango.

Making a Dodge "American Muscle" brand in Europe also might make sense. It's only a problem if one is trying to convey a unified Dodge brand worldwide. Dodge would clearly be a luxury brand in Europe, but it clearly isn't in many other parts of the world.
 

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codypet said:
Would that imply the Durango isn't gonna die anytime soon?
As weird as this may seem, I envision it becoming a Lancia in Europe.

before you think I'm completely looney...
current front clip is probably not euro crash friendly and needs crash tested anyway, so a Lancia grille rework would be doable.
It's definately too upmarket for being a Fiat.
The supposed cancellation of the Chrysler/Lancia 7pass CUV DUSW that was on the 'plan' .
Lancia-Jeep dealers are mostly dualed now, so service depts are Jeep Grand Cherokee friendly already.
 

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What if they just move the Durango to Ram and sell it with the Ram 1500 crd in Europe?
 

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I think it would/could make sense and decent sales both as a Fiat (as a VW Touareg, Citroes C-crosser, Opel Antara alternative) or as a Lancia (where it could command higher prices and be pitched against Audi Q5, Q7 and BMW X5).

But regardless of the badging and he consequent pricing strategy it will need Euro engines.

that means.

3.0 V6 diesel and 3.0 V6 Pentastar as a MUST-DO requirement.

And potentially, if technically feasible, entry level 2.0 L4 diesel (Fiat JTD, already on Freemont) and 2.0-2.4 L4 petrol (WGE). These latter two would allow it to get some better sales.


I for one would support Durango coming over to Europe, as I like it in design, interiors and capablities.
My question is: do they need to launch it in Europe? isn't the plant already running at capacity with all those GC sales'

unless, here's a wild thought, they plan to build it from knock-down kits in Turin alongside the Maserati Levante which shares its architecture and, I assume, much of its components.


66coronet said:
What if they just move the Durango to Ram and sell it with the Ram 1500 crd in Europe?
mmm, RAM 1500 could make sense in Iveco stores.
 

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Dan Minick said:
As weird as this may seem, I envision it becoming a Lancia in Europe.

before you think I'm completely looney...
current front clip is probably not euro crash friendly and needs crash tested anyway, so a Lancia grille rework would be doable.
It's definately too upmarket for being a Fiat.
The supposed cancellation of the Chrysler/Lancia 7pass CUV DUSW that was on the 'plan' .
Uhm no I think that would make very confusing the Chrysler-Lancia identity as a single brand.
Fiat could rebadge it, it's not too upmarket because in Europe the concept of premium is a bit different: it's not about how big or expensive it is, but how expensive it is relatively to the other cars in its class.
Considering the other offers in this class are all from premium brands it would be an unexpensive choice overall.

The only problem I see is that it's not by chance that only premium brands offer this type of vehicle in Europe and sell few of them anyway.

Unfortunately I don't think there is demand for it.
 

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66coronet said:
What if they just move the Durango to Ram and sell it with the Ram 1500 crd in Europe?
This would be one way...
But as a rebadged Lancia, no way.
Chrysler, Dodge or all the us cars have a low quality perception in europe
but when compared to the reputation Lancia, Alfa and Fiat have well..it works as long as the dealer can convince the customer
that it is a just a rebadged tank.
 

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AC TC said:
but when compared to the reputation Lancia, Alfa and Fiat have well..it works as long as the dealer can convince the customer
that it is a just a rebadged tank.
Lancia I'm not even sure has a reputation anymore, Alfa's brand has a huge appeal but it is in a sort of "pause mode" with only 2 cars in the lineup right now. Regarding Fiat you have to distinguish the 500 lineup from the "standard" one: the first one sells very well outside of Italy and it is spurring similar efforts across other brands, the second one is much more Italy-centric.

Anyway what happened with the Journey/Freemont teaches us that the "standard" Fiat lineup works well in case of rebadging, I guess because it is perceived as a sort of work in progress brand.
 

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DaveAdmin said:
I think Freemont's success compared to Voyager, Thema, and Flavia speaks to two factors --

1) Lancias are simply more expensive, the base Lancias have trim equal to or better than the top Chryslers.
2) There are fare more Fiat dealers and owners.
I think a couple other factors as well:
Fiat Freemont, in my opinion really is currently replacing 3 models in the lineup. Multipla & Ulyssee & Chroma. With all three gone, Freemont is set to get the bulk of what those would have been.

Lancia is complicated. Old Lancia dealers are now trying to sell rebadged Chryslers, which may not be a good fit. Old Chrysler-Jeep dealers are now trying to sell Lancia badged cars to former Chrysler customers, which again may not be a good fit.
I, personally think the Lancia-Chrysler blend CAN work, but it needs to start with product development that reflects both brands.
 

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It's unlikely that the Durango will be sold in Europe, as the Freemont (journey) is equipped with a 2.0 multijet diesel which is much more efficient, and so sales are likely to be extremely close to the Grand Cherokee, which will then create further problems if both were to be around as they are very similar products.
 

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Pasta_Bowel said:
It's unlikely that the Durango will be sold in Europe, as the Freemont (journey) is equipped with a 2.0 multijet diesel which is much more efficient, and so sales are likely to be extremely close to the Grand Cherokee, which will then create further problems if both were to be around as they are very similar products.
Fiat dealers are separate from Lancia-Jeep dealers.
 

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It needs a 3.0 diesel and have to fill the price gap between Freemont and Grand Cherokee. If it's not a good deal, sales will disappoint.

They can go after a Nissan Patfinder, Mitsubishi Pajero, Toyota Prado and Volvo XC 90 buyers. And if it's really good deal maybe it can even attract some MB, BMW and Audi customers or the buyers of a smaller SUVs - Sorento, Santa Fe, XC 60, Outlander, CX-7,etc.

Fiat Freemont is between 27k and 36.5k euros ($35k - $47.5k)
The base Grand Cherokee (4wd, keyless entry, HID, electric seats start, uconnect touch) starts at 43.5k euros ($57k).
 

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Bran said:
It needs a 3.0 diesel and have to fill the price gap between Freemont and Grand Cherokee. If it's not a good deal, sales will disappoint.

They can go after a Nissan Patfinder, Mitsubishi Pajero, Toyota Prado and Volvo XC 90 buyers. And if it's really good deal maybe it can even attract some MB, BMW and Audi customers or the buyers of a smaller SUVs - Sorento, Santa Fe, XC 60, Outlander, CX-7,etc.

Fiat Freemont is between 27k and 36.5k euros ($35k - $47.5k)
The base Grand Cherokee (4wd, keyless entry, HID, electric seats start, uconnect touch) starts at 43.5k euros ($57k).
agreed. and fitting the slot between F & GC makes sense. trim levels would need to be slightly below GC, but more upmarket than Freemont. Which, makes the Lancia brand seem to make some sense, weird as it might be. Lancia lineup in euro doesn't have to equal Chrysler in USA. (which it doesn't anyway completely).
 
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