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Automated System
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Enthusiast and car salesman Dom Pike, of Guelph’s Wellington Motors, reported that Chrysler has posted Canadian fuel mileage figures for the 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee — and that the gas mileage is “best in class.” The figures are: City L/100km Highway L/100km City/Highway Imperial mpg City/Highway US mpg EPA US mpg 3-liter EcoDiesel 10.3 7.1 27/40 23/33 21/30 3.6 liter Pentastar 12.3 7.9 23/36 19/30 17/25 5.7 liter V8 15.6 9.9 18/29 15/24 15/21 Europe and Canada officially use liters per 100 kilometers as the fuel efficiency measure; this number goes down as efficiency rises, which is somewhat counter-intuitive, but many believe the number provides a more accurate “feel” of differences between vehicles and fuel usage. Figures are also provided in miles per gallon (mpg, or as TV commercials now say, “em-pee-gee”), but using Imperial gallons. We have converted to US-standard gallons for United States readers, and provided U.S...

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...and all of this without the cost and complexity of hybrid technology!
 

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Say no to kool-aid
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As Dave said, Hybrids have their place. As do Diesels. A Hybrid would be an absolute waste of many for me, but I live out in the country. If I lived in NYC driving a car, where I'd spend more time stopped than moving, the stop / start alone would be a big benefit. Hybrids, I would expect will remain in existence, but a niche for the foreseeable future. So long as it is neither pushed as the answer to all ills by some political elements - and absolutely useless by others, I think that is fine.
 

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23/33 2WD 21/30 4WD for Grand Cherokee?

19/30 2WD 17/25 4WD

All very good numbers! Now if only I had the money for a diesel Grand Cherokee... :thumbsup:
 

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bumonbox said:
As Dave said, Hybrids have their place. As do Diesels. A Hybrid would be an absolute waste of many for me, but I live out in the country. If I lived in NYC driving a car, where I'd spend more time stopped than moving, the stop / start alone would be a big benefit. Hybrids, I would expect will remain in existence, but a niche for the foreseeable future. So long as it is neither pushed as the answer to all ills by some political elements - and absolutely useless by others, I think that is fine.
Really interested in the Peugeot air hybrid system. Simpler energy storage device no software.
 

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DaveAdmin said:
No, it has the cost and complexity of diesel technology, and gets rubbish mileage on the city cycle, you'll notice.

Hybrids are for stop and go driving.
Dave: I'll contest that from engineering standpoint that I understand. Mind you this is on the hypothetical side. The disadvantage of internal combustion engines are fuel consumption while accelerating (hence the disparity of city/highway mpg). So, it they went to a hybrid where the internal combustion engine is optimized for operating at a speed where it will recharge the batteries, that leaves the other stuff to the electric motor, where I suspect it is more efficient. Granted a droning exhaust note will thrill the Hemi & Jeep folks here as much as the CVT, but if I'm right, I think that will be where we are headed. I'm willing to listen to rational arguments against that.
 

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.. hybrid diesel? Combine them for the best of both worlds? .. or maybe the worst of them? lol
 

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suzq044 said:
.. hybrid diesel? Combine them for the best of both worlds? .. or maybe the worst of them? lol
Well if electric hybrid is too expensive, and hydraulic hybrid isn't light what about compressed air with start stop system?
In something like a compass or 500L in size, a 1.4L-2.0L crd with compressed air hybrid system to get it going from a stop. The diesel motor starts once the vehicle is rolling. A mechanical air compressor will recharge the cylinder when the car is moving. The air motor can be used to be an air compressor when diesel motor is in use. A separate output shaft (like AWD) can engage and disengage from the air motor. For a FWD car, the air motor can power the rear axle. Between each end of the air motor it can be disengaged. when it engages to the back, it provides power to the wheels, when it engages to the front it becomes an air compressor. When not needed it will be disengages from both ends. Can automatically engage when smashing petal to the floor for additional power.
An electric air compressor can be a stand by emergency unit. Thus providing power to move the car out of traffic when cylinder gets 3/4 full.
 

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Seagondollar, what exactly are you disagreeing with?

I personally like the stop-start systems -- I'd love one of those -- am constantly sitting at the freakin' light with the engine running. You know what else would be nice? Regenerative braking. I am constantly hitting the brakes due to those idiots who have no clue what a stop sign is for. And the aforementioned traffic lights though I try to time those out.

The now ubiquitous stoplight cameras aren't helping ;)
 

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guyver[this word has been banned due to its use as a pointless flame tool said:
y]23/33 2WD 21/30 4WD for Grand Cherokee?

19/30 2WD 17/25 4WD

All very good numbers! Now if only I had the money for a diesel Grand Cherokee... :thumbsup:
To be more accurate:
Canadian converted mpgs for 2WD are 23/33 and 19/30

US Mileage is:
2WD 3.6: 17/25
4WD 3.6: 17/24
2WD Hemi: 15/21
4WD Hemi: 14/20

The US mileage comes from actual window stickers. Don't have the diesel ones since neither fueleconomy.gov has them, nor do any dealers (since it's a late availability option). The MPG difference is surprisingly low in my mind regarding the difference between the 5 speed and the 8 speed. Makes me wonder why the MPG is such an improvement in the Ram vs the GC. Is it the active shutters or something else.
 

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mentalicca said:
To be more accurate:
Canadian converted mpgs for 2WD are 23/33 and 19/30

US Mileage is:
2WD 3.6: 17/25
4WD 3.6: 17/24
2WD Hemi: 15/21
4WD Hemi: 14/20

The US mileage comes from actual window stickers. Don't have the diesel ones since neither fueleconomy.gov has them, nor do any dealers (since it's a late availability option). The MPG difference is surprisingly low in my mind regarding the difference between the 5 speed and the 8 speed. Makes me wonder why the MPG is such an improvement in the Ram vs the GC. Is it the active shutters or something else.
You weren't using imperial MPG, which would be 27/40 since the imperial gallon is about 20% more than the US gallon.

I don't think we've yet seen the MPG for the Ram 1500 diesel.
 

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DaveAdmin said:
The table carries direct conversions (imperial to US) as well as US EPA figures which are from a different testing set.

Right, that is what I was pointing out. I was just correcting the statement (and adding the 4WD mileage ratings for the Hemi and 3.6):



guyver[this word has been banned due to its use as a pointless flame tool said:
y]23/33 2WD 21/30 4WD for Grand Cherokee?

19/30 2WD 17/25 4WD
This was incorrect because 17/25 MPG is the US EPA 2WD fuel consumption rating, and the 19/30 is the canadian rating converted to US gallons.
 

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mentalicca said:
Right, that is what I was pointing out. I was just correcting the statement (and adding the 4WD mileage ratings for the Hemi and 3.6):




This was incorrect because 17/25 MPG is the US EPA 2WD fuel consumption rating, and the 19/30 is the canadian rating converted to US gallons.
That you for pointing that out.

Edit: for whatever reason, I did not see the EPA ratings on my PC, but I can on my iPhone. Go figure.
 
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