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Discussion Starter #1
Interesting read: Pickup sales approach new highs

However, what that bar chart doesn’t say is that the full-size pickup segment usually was 5th or 6th in sales volume. It is now 2nd in volume in the US and Canada, as sedans wither away and crossovers fragment into multiple segments.

Pickups traditionally gave you more bang for your buck. For instance, the Tacoma TRD Off-Road I just got, with standard rear locker, crawl control, Bilstein shocks and Kevlar reinforced All-Terrain tires had a sticker $20,000 below that of a comparably equipped Wrangler Unlimited.

I wonder if consumers are doing the math at a time when affordability has become an issue.
 

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I don't have statistics to back it up, but if what I heard on the radio is correct, the midsize category is now the fastest growing segment of the pickup market (I'm too lazy to look it up and verify). And FCA's caught with what most people will see as a severely overpriced entry in that segment. Any "Dakota" in whatever form (and it is still being talked about, even if not coming from Toledo sharing a line with Gladiator) is still years away.
Yes, Gladiator will probably sell enough units at a good enough price to be a "success" but they will be missing out on the "mainstream" portion of the market where there will be more volume. And "volume" isn't necessarily bad. You can't completely separate volume and profitability.
Not to mention, there's a strong possibility the "smaller than midsize" truck segment may be coming back as well.
 

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Sticker prices don’t mean much anymore, There are discounts available on most every vehicle. Even the Wrangler.
Stickers mean squat if you buy a Ford, GM, FCA or Nissan. They still have meaning if you buy a Toyota, Honda or Subaru. These three Japanese try to maintain sales in relative alignment with market demand. When we measure consumer demand and compare it to sales, these three automakers keep the two metrics well aligned.

The Big 3 and Nissan focus more on hitting internal sales targets so that they can collect their big fat bonuses. When you compare demand vs sales metrics, these automakers consistently sell well above demand. Those extra sales, however, do not come free: they come at the cost of dealer discounts, factory incentives, and ongoing brand erosion.

Wrangler MSRPs had meaning until a couple of years ago. Unfortunately that’s now history.

With the exception of Lexus and Acura, MSRPs in the luxury field are a complete joke.
 
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