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Discussion Starter #1
I am the guy with '92 Shadow convertible. 2.5 non-turbo automatic currently sporting the rusted shut hood noted in a previous post.....

The car was parked about 6 years ago over an old willow tree stump, and of course everthing around it washed away, leaving it propped on the back axle over the stump and 3 of the 4 tires sunk into muck, most of the car was resting on the floor pan. After a couple of days of jacking and digging, I am happy to rpeort that it now rests on its own tires, which are holding air, supported by 2x8's and cinder blocks.

We did not do anything right about prepping it for storage, of course thinking it was just a temporary situation, (but time does fly by as I get older).

I call it barn find because we did not prep it and totally ignored it for 6 years, no periodic start ups.

So the question, is, assuming I get the hood up, what steps should I take before throwing on the jumper cables and hitting the key?

The obvious to me would be cleaning out the air cleaner/indcution housing of any signs of rodent infestation, pulling the plugs and shooting some oil in, and turning it over by hand to see if it is seized.

Are there any other "must do's" before powering up?

I am guessing it would be prudent to change oil and coolant, but it isn't in a spot to get it jacked up any more than it already is. I just need to move it about 20 yards while the ground is frozen to get her to safety......
 

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You've hit all the high points, especially about pulling the plugs, squirting some oil or penetrant in the cylinders and turning it over by hand before trying to start it. You may want to see what's happening in the gas tank. That could be a problem with some really stale fuel or some combination of really stale fuel and a mix of water and who knows what else. If there's junk in there, it will probably not get past the fuel filter, or at least not for long.
I'd say give it a shot. If the fuel isn't completely turned to molasses or full of water you may be able to fill the tank with fresh fuel and get by.
As Dirty Harry once said, "are you feeling lucky ?? "
 

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Condition of the fuel is a big concern. Parked with about 1/2 a tank, suspect its absorbed a lot of water. Sigh.
Dumped some additive in just to make me feel better, don't really expect great results.

Debating on trying pump it out, but also figure that will just leave all the sludge that will get sucked in eben if I put fresh stuff in on top of it.

Once I can get it to a better place to work on it, I figure to check out the brakes and flush the fluid. Hoping that stayed sealed up, most of the brake system was replaced, only had about 3,000 miles on it when parked.
 

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The ignition system will probably also need service. New plugs, wires, cap and rotor will run you about $40-60 IIRC. These cars eat rotors, but they're only a few bucks. Transmission fluid and oil change would be a good plan as well, there's going to be condensation in the oil for sure. Transmission fluid spec for the A-413 is ATF+4. These transmissions are much less picky about their fill than the A604/41TE four-speeds; original fill spec was Dex/Merc, which was updated to ATF+3, now superceded by ATF+4. I've heard that the A-413 will tolerate Type F as well, but I stick to the ATF+4 for the torque converter clutch's sake.
Fuel lines are mild steel, and replacing the fuel filter might break them if they are very rusted. If you have to replace the quick-connects at the fuel filter, you can use hoses and clamps, as long as whatever you use is specifically rated for use with fuel injection systems.
 

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If it is any consolation, I bought an 89 Geo Metro with 21K miles that sat from 92 to 08 and all it needed to start was a hot battery and two gallons of gas in a basically empty tank. Cranked over for about three seconds and it hit. Running ever since.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
PCR, I can only hope! But it seems my close relative Murphy is making his present known with this car..... per above, I haven;t even gotten the hood open yet (and a couple feet of snow sitting on it makes even less likely right now!)

A lot was done not long before parking it, head gasket, timing belt, complete brake system, fuel filter, a few of those 3 letter doobies under the hood like the TPS.... and a complete manifold back exhaust system, which i know is at least partially shot now.
 

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At this point, if it can be pulled and rolls on its own, that's a good start, but sitting in mud up to its axles chances are good the mud made its way into the hubs and drums, but we can always hope. First things first, see if it turns over, then see if it will start. Given the plastic tanks and all, I would drain and clean the tank, you can actually get your hand in the tanks to clean them, and you could actually separately check the pump to make sure it works (tank pump or engine pump???), Either way, use a can and run the lines to see if she will start with fresh gas that way.

From there, pull each and every wheel, different sides and weather/elements can damage and not damage withour rhyme or reason.
 

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I don't think these tanks are plastic. My Spirit has a steel tank. The exhaust may have more kick in it than you would think; as Bob Lincoln pointed out in another thread, they corrode from the inside out due to a chemical reaction with the exhaust gases. The pipes are aluminized, which is similar in concept to galvanization (from what I understand, thanks to dana44 on that one) but with aluminum, so that should have offered some protection.
 

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The stock exhaust system isn't stainless like the Dakotas? I kind of figured all the tanks were plastic by '92, my bad on that. When did they all go plastic?
 

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The only car I know that changed from metal to plastic tanks is the Neon. It was a metal tank for 1995 and went to plastic in 1996 or 1997. I think all the K variations kept a metal tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Its a steel tank, no not a stainless exhaust system. Tanks are available and short money, not so sure whether its better to clean or just replace. And yes the plan will be to pull everthing wheel by wheel and address issues as needed. But first need to get the damn hood unfrozen and open!
 

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I had always thought that they where stainless steel exhuast systems. Chrysler had been saying it was since 1985. I haven't had an exhuast system rust out yet, but I am in Florida.
 

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If you have the option, replace the tank. Be aware that you're going to run into a LOT of rust, and that will mean replacing parts/extra time. A new tank, however, will probably have a coating on the inside which should hold corrosion off. It might also be a good idea to look into fuel pumps while you're in there if you decide to replace the tank. The pump usually fails somewhere between 100-200k, often without warning. While replacing things that aren't broken isn't really a great idea, it's such a headache to have to drop the tank and replace it that proactivity might help in this case.
 

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All Daytonas have steel fuel tanks. My 92 Dakota has a polypropylene tank. I saw a 97 Breeze for sale once that had a plastic tank.

Exhausts have NOT all been stainless since 1985. Daytonas started out with stainless, but in 1989, Chrysler did a big cost reduction and switched back to carbon steel for the Daytona and possibly other cars. At some point, I believe they switched back to SS.
 

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I know all Chrysler cars and trucks for 1988 and 1989 where stainless steel. Earliest book I have in front of me shows Stainless steel on the Daytona in 87-93. Every car I have owned had been stainless steel except my 84 Laser Turbo.
 

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Your book is wrong. 92 Daytona had carbon steel exhaust from the factory.
 

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Either way and back on topic.... I've been professionally resurrecting people's long forgotten dreams for around 15 years now and most recently was the "old car guy" at a local high end european shop. I've made things run like a 56 Jag XK 140 with a C type that sat with water (eek) in the cooling system for 40 years. First to do is check that there's no contamination in the oil - old oil is fine for a few minutes of running if you're out in the field. Second and VERY IMPORTANT is to check the condition of any rubber fuel line as a leak here can cost you a car and possible some injury or worse.Fresh gas on top of a small amount of old stuff is usually fine. After that check coolant, POWER STEERING (dry pump = failure) and trans fluid - dry trans pump = failure too... Then and only then are you ready to hit it with a new battery (don't jump it or you'll fry the ECM running the dead batt on the alternator - it's to the elec system what it is to the engine to go wide open in neutral)..... This should get you over to the garage/barn/shed/whatever so you can change fluids, check brakes (change that fluid too it's hygroscopic) and chase the critters out..... Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
B10alia said:
If you have the option, replace the tank. Be aware that you're going to run into a LOT of rust, and that will mean replacing parts/extra time. A new tank, however, will probably have a coating on the inside which should hold corrosion off. It might also be a good idea to look into fuel pumps while you're in there if you decide to replace the tank. The pump usually fails somewhere between 100-200k, often without warning. While replacing things that aren't broken isn't really a great idea, it's such a headache to have to drop the tank and replace it that proactivity might help in this case.
The pump and sender were replaced within a couple thousand miles/ 6 months of parking it, but if I go the route of replacing the tank I will replace that as well..... short money and good insurance if I end going to that effort.

And if I go that effort, anyone here have any experience replacing all the lines too? Haven't found any direct fit replacements listed from the usual sources, would this be a lot of fabrication or pretyy doable?

B10alia, if you have been by my street lately, you know that on top of being in the weeds behind my garage it is also sitting behind a 10 foot snow bank the plow created, so most attempts to do anything are on hold right now :)
 

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Discussion Starter #19
gearhead2578 said:
Either way and back on topic.... I've been professionally resurrecting people's long forgotten dreams for around 15 years now and most recently was the "old car guy" at a local high end european shop. I've made things run like a 56 Jag XK 140 with a C type that sat with water (eek) in the cooling system for 40 years. First to do is check that there's no contamination in the oil - old oil is fine for a few minutes of running if you're out in the field. Second and VERY IMPORTANT is to check the condition of any rubber fuel line as a leak here can cost you a car and possible some injury or worse.Fresh gas on top of a small amount of old stuff is usually fine. After that check coolant, POWER STEERING (dry pump = failure) and trans fluid - dry trans pump = failure too... Then and only then are you ready to hit it with a new battery (don't jump it or you'll fry the ECM running the dead batt on the alternator - it's to the elec system what it is to the engine to go wide open in neutral)..... This should get you over to the garage/barn/shed/whatever so you can change fluids, check brakes (change that fluid too it's hygroscopic) and chase the critters out..... Good luck!
Thanks Gearhead.... good to know I have some latitude in getting it moved before doing all the fluid replacement. Hadn't thought of checking the PS fluid.

Tank is a little under half-full, but can't remember if any stabilizer was added when parked.....

I unfortunately missed a great window of opportunity to move/pull/push/tow/drive out of the abyss having frozen ground and no snow, hope my timing is better as spring approaches or just getting it onto pavement is going to be create a year long thread!
 

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Minor update--- snow bank melted to under 10 feet and nearly 50 degree weather let me back at it today.... got hood popped open (funny how graifying the little things can be huh?)

Much ugliness under there but mostly can be dealt with by some quality time with a shop vac, hose and lots of gloves. Obviously home to assorted critters over the years, but fluid levels were maintained, no obvoius exterior hose damage and the spark plugs are NOT frozen in, so I consider it a good day at the moment.

Time for Chinese food and beer.

Had to share with the forum since my family doesn't quite under my excitement LOL
 
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