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Discussion Starter #1
Looking for some guidance......

Apparently the transmission in the 93 Daytona, 2.5 N/A, that I drove for a year or so without any problems and then gave to my daughter to drive has major issues. Long story on what she and her Mom did, but not relevant, I guess.

My question, I have the auto trans. that came out of a 90 Caravan that donated its engine to my 91, is that the same trans? The Caravan was a turbo, so I suppose I will have some axle issues, but probably cheaper than rebuilding the trans that's in it.

I have 2 extra axles for the 91 Daytona turbo that the engine went in, will that solve the axle issue?
 

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Well, back at it this morning doing some more research, looks like they both should be A413's, but should and is can sometimes be different.

Do the auto's have the little round identification tag on them? The spare trans is out in storage and the car is 15 miles away.

And after doing some more thinking, the turbo axles I have from the 91 are for a manual transmission, so that probably won't work either.

Wondering if the reason the turbo axles are different, is for strength and not how the go into the transaxle, maybe?
 

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manual transes hav a tag-mark on top of trans,close to engine. And yes swaping is almost always a cheaper solusion than repairing. Axles you will always get someway.
 

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Plumkrzy3;

The axles for turbo and non-turbo are the same on the driver's side; on the passenger side in a non-turbo, the axle is one piece and longer than the driver's side axle (refered to as unequal). In a turbo, the driver's side axle is the same length as the driver's side, (hince it is refered to as an equale length axle) but utlizes an intermediate shaft with a carrier bearing to support them, additionally the intermediate shaft/carrier bearing are supported by some bracketry.

You can use the equal length turbo type on a non-turbo but will need the intermediat shaft, carrier bearing and supporting brackets. You can also use the unequal length axle on a turbo, it will not require the intermediate shaft, carrier bearing or supporting brackets.

After removing an axle you may need to perform the engine centering proceedure.

Where you need to excersive awareness is with the axle size change in either 87 or 88, when a larger diameter axle shaft replaced the older style. As I understand, you should probabely not mix the 2.

The
 

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To the best of my knowledge, the auto and manual axle are the same, the van axles are different from the car axles.
 

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Yes, the axle sizes did change around 1987 or so, and have a different number of splines, so they will not fit in the hub and transaxle that is not compatible.
 

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Axles are no problem but the 1990 Turbo Caravan trans does not have a lockup torque convertor. Not really a problem just one difference.

Thanks
Randy
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you for all the responses.

Finally got to drive the car over the weekend. The problems started with a leak in a cooler line and running it low on trans. fluid and her still trying to get it home. Got that fixed and it drove just fine, although it probably did shorten it's life considerably. Then a week later, her Mom got it stuck in the snow and even though I told her not to, rocked it back and forth trying to get it out. Dumb, dumb, dumb.

Anyway, now sometimes, when you take off or when it shifts into second, it shudders pretty bad, so I'm assuming the clutch packs are on their last legs. If you take off slow and are not under heavy throttle when it shifts, it doesn't do it, so I am going to let her run it until it gives up completely or until it gets warmer and then I'll throw in the other transmission.

Sounds like it should be a pretty straight forward swap.
 
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