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I was fortunate enough to recently purchase an immaculate, 2012 Avenger SXT+. The car was so well maintained and nicely detailed, the only giveaway that it was not brand new was the odometer.. More importantly, it drives like a brand new car. I have been driving full-size SUV's and econo-boxes, so it was quite a surprise to lay a patch, pulling off from a stop sign! For the first couple of days, I felt like a teenager again, but at 64 I now tend to be a little more practical. I am learning, slowly, not to squall tires on take-off (though I admit, sometimes it's a guilty pleasure).
All of this leads to my question... Will the Avenger take a 245x80R18? And would that help significantly with breaking traction on take-off? It is just a lot to get used to after getting a battleship underway, or beating all 109 dead horses to get them moving...
 

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Virginia Gentleman
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Check the sticker on the drivers door. There should be a standard tire size stamped on it. You can usually go up one size with no issue. You can also check TireRack.com. Enter in the vehicle year, make and model and it will list the tire sizes for your car.
 

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. . . . For the first couple of days, I felt like a teenager again, but at 64 I now tend to be a little more practical. I am learning, slowly, not to squall tires on take-off (though I admit, sometimes it's a guilty pleasure). . . .
You must have a V6 engine in the car. If your vehicle had the 2.4 liter 4 cylinder I don't think you could provoke tire spinning quite as easily. And since the vehicle is "drive by wire" / electronic throttle control there is less resistance in pressing the accelerator pedal compared to previous vehicles you have driven.

. . . Will the Avenger take a 245x80R18? And would that help significantly with breaking traction on take-off? It is just a lot to get used to after getting a battleship underway, or beating all 109 dead horses to get them moving...
Go to this site and put in existing vehicle tire size and proposed tire size. It will give you pertinent facts about overall tire diameter and tire width. The concern one should have with going to a larger tire size as you suggest is tire rubbing when front wheels are turned left or right. Also you could have tire rubbing the vehicle fender liner do to up and down movement of the suspension. As a general rule a tire with a wider tread (higher aspect ratio) should provide more traction and less likely to spin.

Tire Size Comparison (at https://tiresize.com/comparison/ )
 

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I'm hoping he meant 50R and not 80R on the tire profile. Can't imagine an 80R tire these days on a car.

And I've found with drive-bhy-wire that the throttle is harder to ease into, instead of gradually taking up cable slack, the pedal engages abruptly and the car leaps forward. It takes a lot of conscious finesse to control it, vs a mechanical cable. I've chirped the tires on my 2011 Chrysler 200 with 4-cyl.
 
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Virginia Gentleman
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To add to Allan's post if you go with alternate size tire you may want the TCM or ECM reprogrammed with the new tire size. I went with a larger tire (LT265/70/17) on my Ram than what it came with originally (P245/70/17). The LT265's are slightly larger in diameter and since then my speedometer is off by a few mph. According to my GPS when the speedometer is showing 55 mph I'm actually at 58 mph.
 
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Virginia Gentleman
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I'm hoping he meant 50R and not 80R on the tire profile. Can't imagine an 80R tire these days on a car.
Do they even make an 80R? :confused: I agree, if he wants more grip he needs a wider tire, not a thinner one. Or a tire with softer rubber for better grip, but the downside of that is faster tire wear. Daughter's '05 Neon (bought new) came with Good Years and within 36K miles they were worn out. Great grip in dry/wet weather, but they simply did not last. Conversely, I bought Hoosiers one time. Very hard rubber, but the grip in wet weather (dry was okay) was much to be desired when they were half worn out - was like driving on a ice rink in wet weather or at least felt like it.

And I've found with drive-bhy-wire that the throttle is harder to ease into, instead of gradually taking up cable slack, the pedal engages abruptly and the car leaps forward. It takes a lot of conscious finesse to control it, vs a mechanical cable. I've chirped the tires on my 2011 Chrysler 200 with 4-cyl.
I don't know if that is necessarily true. I've had my '06 Ram 1500 for 12+ years and it has throttle drive-by-wire and I've had no problem easing into the throttle when I needed to. Maybe it's because I'm so use to it. The '93 Aerostar we use to have had a sticky cable when first driven for the day. Once you unstuck it, it was fine for the rest of the day until it sat overnight. Short of replacing it I tried all kinds of lubricants and could never get it to not stick when first driven for the day.
 

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I'd spend more time looking at individual tire ratings in the stock size than worrying about finding a larger tire.
A high traction tire in the stock size might be better than an average tire in a wider size.

As Doug mentions, a grippier tire may have a shorter tread life. I usually end up replacing long wearing tires by the date rather than being worn out anyway.
 
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