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A question here. Someone said the Barracuda convertible frames were weak and when both doors were opened the car would sag. I have always understood that convertible frames and undercarriages were beefier than hardtops so this would not happen. Who is correct?? I had a 1967 Barracuda ragtop and it seemed just fine. Answers??? Thanks.

Duane
 

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There is no "frame" on a Barracuda. They were unibody cars. There is extra bracing added to make up for some of the rigidity lost without a steel roof. Other makes, which may be body on frame or unibody may have had worse flex.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There is no "frame" on a Barracuda. They were unibody cars. There is extra bracing added to make up for some of the rigidity lost without a steel roof. Other makes, which may be body on frame or unibody may have had worse flex.
Thanks for the reply. What you stated is exactly what I thought and had read before.
 

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They are pretty stiff but the roofed ones are stiffer, this can generally be said about conv vs coupes.
The 2 door post is usually stiffer than a 4 door post and after that comes 2 door ht..4 door ht and last the conv.
This is one reason a conv doesent make a good race car.
 
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"valiant67" - "There is no "frame" on a Barracuda. They were unibody cars. There is extra bracing added to make up for some of the rigidity lost without a steel roof. Other makes, which may be body on frame or unibody may have had worse flex."


How many times have we read ads after ads claiming (such and such) MOPAR, with uni-body, has undergone a 'frame-up' or worse - a 'frame-off'' resto? :confused: Almost as annoying is someone referring to a Sure-Grip diff. as a Posi.
Such is life, I suppose, so eventually I may get used to it.
Worked on '69 Barracuda Rag a decade ago and it was beefed-up pretty good in rocker-panel areas. Couple other ways to stiffen would be via a roll-cage ( but the 'esthetics' would be brutal) and of course the durable and more discrete frame connectors.
 

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Worse still, some call an Engine a motor!!

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Randy
 
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Worse still, some call an Engine a motor!!

Thanks
Randy
Thanks for that one, Randy. I always thought motor referred to the electrical type and not internal combustion engines! Drives me crazy too.
 
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Worse still, some call an Engine a motor!!

Thanks
Randy
If you are a firefighter, an engine is a truck that is designed to pump water. The power source is its motor.
 

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If a furnace man ever tells me I need a new ENGINE for my furnace fan I will take note.

Until then I will respect the difference between an Engine and a motor.

Somewhat annoys me that many mechanics and car buffs can't tell the difference but a furnace man can !!

For me its a matter of respect for Engines as I love Engines!!!

Thanks
Randy
 

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And so do i!

Engine1.jpg
 

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This FIRE ENGINE ad says its powered by a 300 H.P. Engine!!

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Randy

 

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Yup. That's all you need. It's the torque that launches it. These motors don't go over about 2400 RPM, but those trucks do fly. Even the ones I drove that were made in the 1960s and 70s.
BTW, that's a VERY old ad, at least 25-30 years.
 

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Exactly, Detroit builds motor cars mostly powered by Engines, just like Fire Engines.

To motor is to drive, if Detroit only made Engines, it might be Engine City.

Happy motoring means happy driving, strangely many car guys get it wrong.

As mentioned, furnace guys never call a furnace motor a furnace Engine!!

If someone needed a heater motor imagine the response if they asked for a heater Engine.

Or, I need a starter Engine for my Barracuda, unibody, 12 V ..

Thanks
Randy


Detroit is called motor city.
 
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Make sure you use the proper words when talking about a firefighter vs a fireman, also. ;)

A firefighter puts out fires.
A fireman stokes a furnace.
 

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Appreciate the education!!

I like to learn correct terms.

EG: wheel/rim

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Randy
 

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Its just you and me Chuzz, standing up for the Internal Combustion Engine !!!

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Randy

Thanks for that one, Randy. I always thought motor referred to the electrical type and not internal combustion engines! Drives me crazy too.
 

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Its just you and me Chuzz, standing up for the Internal Combustion Engine !!!

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Randy
That's okay with me, Randy. I've always marched to the beat of my own drum. And it's always been a little off cadence with everyone else's!
 

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Back in 1959 to 1962 when I was in high school automotive classes we were taught that a "Motor" needs an external power source (example electricity) to operate where as an engine produces it's own power to operate. Also, after running race dynos for 25 years using electric dynos we would "motor" the engine using the dyno to do so and get it up to speed (800 rpm) and then turn on the gas and electric so the engine is running and therefore powering the dyno. This causes the dyno to become a generator and the power would go to a outside source. After the power run was completed we would shut off the gas and electric so that the dyno was motoring the engine and we would motor the engine up through the speed range and record the friction horsepower at all the points. Therefore we would graph the the power produced by the engine (BHP) against the friction of the engine (FHP) to see where improvement could be made.
 
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