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If you don't want to re-purchase the OEM shock, my recommendation is to use the Bilstein 5100 series.
The caveat is: unless you get the shocks tuned to your specific vehicle, the performance will not match the factory OEM shock. The key word being match. The aftermarket shock will be different, either firmer or with a different jounce and or rebound performance, but it will not necessarily be better.
Aftermarket shocks such as Rancho are not tuned for a specific application and yet some like the feel of the Rancho, because the 9000 series is adjustable, therefore it feels "different".
The Bilstein 5100 series is tuned to the 9th degree lift, only when it comes with the lift.
Off the shelf shocks are not tuned. For that reason, I'd use the OEM shock on a stock, un-modified Wrangler. Placing a performance shock on a stock, on-road Wrangler, will accomplish little and flatten your wallet, for no discernible gain.
 

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drew54 said:
Just to cover some ideas I had, lets get into hypothetical specifics here.

Do any of our parts guys know if the factory shocks are the same for Sport/X/Sahara models? Do they use the same springs. Also, what about model years. Would the factory replacement shocks now the same as what are on the 2013s?

We know the Rubicon shocks are different than the lower trim levels. Those take offs would offer different ride than the X originally had. If the springs are the same between all models, then you would theoretically end up close to the same feel as a Rubicon.

*Just to update, there are many different part numbers listed for shocks and springs on Mopar.com
There are different shock/springs for 2 doors and 4 doors and different shock/springs for Rubicon's. so at least 4 different combinations.
2007 to 2014 are interchangeable.
 

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drew54 said:
I have seen many TJ owners using this shock on other forums. It does have 9 settings so I suppose one could really fine tune to their opinion of ride quality. I do not know anyone personally that has run them, how is the durability of the shock? It always seems to me these aftermarket shocks are nothing but rust in about 3 years in the midwest.
The Rancho shock has different settings for pressure and valving, but it's not a "tuned" shock.
Shocks are tunable to your spring rate and vehicle rate, by using a shock dyno and selecting the proper valving for jounce and rebound, in conjunction with the spring rate and weight of the vehicle.
So it can't really be fine tuned in the technical sense, but can get close, in some, but not all parameters.
Most OEM shocks are built by the same companies that make aftermarket shocks, so longevity is similar, unless you are really bottom feeding by price alone.
I last ran Rancho's in the 1990's, that's all, I'll say about them. ;)
On my daily driver I use tuned Bilsteins, on our race Jeep we use Fox.
 
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