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2014 Jeep Compass
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True enough. I'm still wondering about that. The equipment that absolutely needed protection should have had what just about every data center has: batteries for ten minutes and Cummins generators for the next months, with a two-week fuel supply plus natural gas input.

Perhaps they didn't weatherproof their backup power? That happened to Liquidweb years and years ago; they had a power failure in the middle of winter and their Cummins generators refused to start. Cummins sent a bunch of people over and they figured out some solutions and redesigned their generators (well, patched them, anyway).
I don't understand why they wouldn't spend money they'd make back handsomely to prevent losing money. They may be in Texas, but even Maine & Alaska have nearly hit 100* fahrenheit before, so you'd imagine they'd always think & prepare for the worst.
 

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1974 Plymouth Valiant - 2013 Dodge Dart - 2013 Chrysler 300C
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I don't understand why they wouldn't spend money they'd make back handsomely to prevent losing money. They may be in Texas, but even Maine & Alaska have nearly hit 100* fahrenheit before, so you'd imagine they'd always think & prepare for the worst.
All of Texas was like that, and I can only think that it was one of these:
"it can never happen here (again)"; or
"how dare the Feds tell us what to do!" (which seems likely); or
"I'll have retired before this happens again"; or
"I'll get my bonus now, and if everything fails later, I'll get another bonus for fixing it"; or
"That would be admitting that climate change is accurate, which my party and my contributors have already said must never, ever, ever be admitted."

At the plant level, if could be that they did have preventive measures in place, which did not work. Like I said, that happened to Liquidweb years and years ago, when they were a pretty small but very well managed company, and it really blindsided them. (Now they're a very large and I think far less customer-focused company, unless you happen to be an "Enterprise" customer.)
 

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This might make me sound a little crazy, but is there anyone else with a slight suspicion that this chip shortage might be a bit like an artificial scarcity? Fewer vehicles to sell is less of a problem when there is no room to negotiate for price for the buyer. Basically, a shortage of supply will drive up prices. Just a thought, with no proof or evidence to back it up.
Not a chance. It's affecting everything with electronics. We make analytical instruments and systems, and we are just now feeling the crunch. When you see 51-week lead time, you know it's real. When you see 99-week lead time, you know that the vendor doesn't even know when they can deliver (because they just entered the highest number possible in the 2-digit field).
 
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Ford made it personal in 2015.

Maybe they should have apologized for their poor product that almost killed me. Their corporate reaction to blame ME for THEIR known poor quality product that should have never hit the market. Read about the fiasco that was the Ford Focus.

My schadenfreude is at 11 with them.

Ford workers are missing a golden opportunity to get Ford.

Ford has violated the UAW/Ford contract of 2019 by moving product to Mexico.

One strike and Ford is done.

I will certainly help swing a sledgehammer to tear down their plants.
Based on your logic, I should never buy another GM product or Subaru ever, nor an FCA product. The only vehicles I have ever experienced a catalytic converter failure were Mopars, a 1987 Horizon with the

carbureted 2.2L that the converter internally disintegrated and parts of it would block the outlet and a 2005 T&C that the flex joint cracked on. Both ended up being out of pocket even though they should have

been emission covered. On the GM, I have owned 2 Oldsmobiles, two Chevrolets (Corvairs) one Pontiac and one Buick, one Oldsmobile was a Jetfire, the first US turbocharged car (beat the Spyder by

about 1 month). All the other GMs were Diesels and I got extremely proficient at rebuilding Roosamaster injection pumps. Both Oldsmobiles liked to eat transmissions, the Jetfire had the Roto-Hydramatic

model 5 and the Delta 88 had the THM200. My first LeBaron convertible was a 1985 with the 2.6L Mitsubishi engine, due to the crappy electronics the feedback carburetor might or might not enrich the

mixture for power when needed, so it was a crapshoot if you stomped it as to whether it would quickly or sluggishly. Once it cracked the head in 3 of 4 combustion chambers, I put a 2.2L TurboII in it.

The Subaru was just a problem waiting to happen, and happen they did, I replaced it after a year with a used Taurus that I kept from late 2009 till last September.
 

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People don't understand how BAD these cars were and how BAD Ford was treating it's customers.

I had that exact delay movement turning left one day. It stopped in a intersection with a large tractor trailer bearing down on me.

Ford purposely put a death trap vehicle on the road.

It's personal.
Lol... You need help. Seriously, get some counseling.
 
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