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The Magnum SRT8 manual doesn't specify how often the brake fluid should get changed. Most German manufacturers recommend doing it every 2 years. So does Goss from Motorweek. My service advisor at my dealership said it should just be checked but doesn't necessarily need to be changed. Any advice?

Also, I am only driving the car about a 1000 miles/year. Should a yearly oil change be good enough? Especially since it is using synthetic? Thanks!
 

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Maybe a brake fluid flush every 4 yr/ 60K would be good. Drain at all 4 wheels until it runs clear. This also keeps the bleeder screws free.
Power steering, coolant, transmission and rear axle changes may also be a good idea every 60K.
The engine oil would barely darken at 1000 miles and should be fine as long as the car is stored in a fairly temperate and dry area.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks! Should power steering, coolant, transmission and axle fluid be changed after let's say 6 years or so? Or do these never go bad when just sitting?
 

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Fluid does age, but maybe less so with daily temperature changes like driving. Brake fluid does absorb moisture from just sitting (hydroscopic?).
 

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Brake fluid I personally really like the DOT5 fluid which is silicon based and does not absorb moisture. I have it in all our cars except for the Challenger SRT - even the old beater Intrepid. On the SRT 6 spd there is no way to bleed out the hydraulic clutch which shares the brake fluid reservoir and not good to mix it. What i plan to do on the Challenter is use a synthetic hi temp DOT3 and every year bleed a cup or two through the system to keep it fresh at every wheel. I used to have trouble with calipers seizing on the Daytona when I first started storing it winters ( I assume due to moisture in the fluid and rusting up the caliper) until I changed to DOT5 - no issues since - and whenever i have checked the fluid has been clear have not flushed it in years. With brakes being aluminum and stainless now that's less of an issue.
On oil changes - when I bought the Challenger I wrote Chrysler to ask about their 6 month max oil change interval if I am storing the car 6 months or more a year - they would not back off on it so I change mine every 6 months - just so happens it has 6 months to drain very completely while it is stored :). I would average
 

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DOT 5 is NOT, I repeat, NOT compatible with DOT 3 or DOT 4 fluids and seals. If you put DOT 5 in a car that was designed for DOT 3 or DOT 4, you're screwed. DOT 5 will quickly ruin the rubber parts in the system and destroy it. Essentially you have to replace everything.


DOT 5.1, however, is compatible with DOT 3 and DOT 4. So make sure you are VERY careful to select the right fluid. DOT 5 can only go in a car that was originally made for DOT 5, and a Daytona is WAY too old a car for that.

With brakes being aluminum and stainless now that's less of an issue.
I have no idea what this means. Can you explain? What is now made of aluminum and stainless that wasn't before?
 

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DOT 5 is NOT, I repeat, NOT compatible with DOT 3 or DOT 4 fluids and seals. If you put DOT 5 in a car that was designed for DOT 3 or DOT 4, you're screwed. DOT 5 will quickly ruin the rubber parts in the system and destroy it. Essentially you have to replace everything.


DOT 5.1, however, is compatible with DOT 3 and DOT 4. So make sure you are VERY careful to select the right fluid. DOT 5 can only go in a car that was originally made for DOT 5, and a Daytona is WAY too old a car for that.

I have no idea what this means. Can you explain? What is now made of aluminum and stainless that wasn't before?
IMHO DOT5 doesn't need to be called DOT5. That implies it supersedes DOT3&4 which it does not... It would like GM coming with a new version of Dexron fluid called ATF+5.. Not compatiable with any Chrysler fluid, just for comparison sake...
 

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DOT 5 is NOT, I repeat, NOT compatible with DOT 3 or DOT 4 fluids and seals. If you put DOT 5 in a car that was designed for DOT 3 or DOT 4, you're screwed. DOT 5 will quickly ruin the rubber parts in the system and destroy it. Essentially you have to replace everything.


DOT 5.1, however, is compatible with DOT 3 and DOT 4. So make sure you are VERY careful to select the right fluid. DOT 5 can only go in a car that was originally made for DOT 5, and a Daytona is WAY too old a car for that.

I have no idea what this means. Can you explain? What is now made of aluminum and stainless that wasn't before?
I have had the DOT5 (maybe its 5.1... will check) in the Daytona since 1997 - have drained / flushed a little since but always clean - never completely flushed it again - have not replaced a caliper since - before that every 2-3 years one. Master Cyl still original too. I did rebuilt the drum rears cause they were getting tight after 20 years but the seals showed no unusual signs.

The metals I was refering to - in the Daytona the calipers are cast iron I believe and they do rust outside and inside if you get moisture in teh fluid in my experience - I think the pistons were composite not sure - maybe steel too. On the Charger the calipers are aluminium - and I assume the pistons aluminum also or composite. On the Challenger its all stainless steel. So my point was if they are Al or stainless then water absorbtion in the fluid causing rust and seizure of calipers as I used to have on the Daytona with iron calipers - not so much an issue.

I use the DOT5 on my 1982 Gold Wing too - have rebuilt the calipers on it just to be sure they are ok twice as you can no longer buy them so I rebuild them to make sure they stay new - seals also look fine there and no issues with any seals.
 

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So my point was if they are Al or stainless then water absorbtion in the fluid causing rust and seizure of calipers as I used to have on the Daytona with iron calipers - not so much an issue.
That's not correct for aluminum. Aluminum oxide forms readily in the presence of moisture and heat, and it's a white, powdery substance that I'm sure you've seen on underhood brackets, etc. That would most assuredly cause problems if it formed in the brake fluid system.
 

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That's not correct for aluminum. Aluminum oxide forms readily in the presence of moisture and heat, and it's a white, powdery substance that I'm sure you've seen on underhood brackets, etc. That would most assuredly cause problems if it formed in the brake fluid system.
Good point - seen it mainly on aluminum rims esp if they have seen winter miles.
 
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