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Discussion Starter #1
Did a cam/belt swap a while back and noticed the factory cam seals were leaking, so I replaced. Now doing a head upgrade and notice oil seepage again at the lower passenger side of block, just like before when the cam seals were leaking. I used a socket that fit the seal diameter to push into the cap after cam install. Is it possible I pushed in to far to cause a seal to leak? I read in the SRTForums were someone started the seal and then let the cam gear push it in to the correct depth has the tighten the cam bolt. Any ideas would be appreciated.

thanks
tom
 

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There should be a lip on the inside to prevent the seal from going too deep. I fear letting the cam gear push the seal in only as far as the cam gear goes could lead to early failure due to the cam sprocket running against the front of the seal. This is one of those cases where wiping a thin film of silicone sealer around the outside edge of the cam seal may be needed even though they don't normally leak, there have been a few cases. Ensure there isn't any knicks or scratches on the front of the cam seal surface and that the front cap isn't loose or any dirt within the two surfaces which would prevent if from clamping down against the outside properly.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
dana44 said:
There should be a lip on the inside to prevent the seal from going too deep. I fear letting the cam gear push the seal in only as far as the cam gear goes could lead to early failure due to the cam sprocket running against the front of the seal. This is one of those cases where wiping a thin film of silicone sealer around the outside edge of the cam seal may be needed even though they don't normally leak, there have been a few cases. Ensure there isn't any knicks or scratches on the front of the cam seal surface and that the front cap isn't loose or any dirt within the two surfaces which would prevent if from clamping down against the outside properly.
Yea, I'm thinking the same thing.
 

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If this is a higher mileage engine, A groove could be worn into the cam seal journal where the seal lip rides. If minor, they can be cleaned up. If major, a speedi-sleeve can offer a fresh metal wear surface.
While the head is off, make sure that the oil galley plugs are secure.
A dab of RTV should be applied at the front journal cap corners where the valve cover sits.
I have never heard of pressing the seal in with the cam sprockets and can't see how this could be a recommended method.
Use a blunt cylindrical arbor to drive them in straight or find the special tool:
http://www.autotoolworld.com/product.asp?itemid=156641&gclid=CN-F_4bP3rQCFSXNOgod5HwALQ
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'll try this tool and see what happens. Would like to get this fixed right. Cams were new and have no wear on the seal journal.

thanks
 

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Do an extremely good check for where the oil is leaking. New cams rarely leak through the seal unless it wasn't oiled when installed, or the oil hole that feeds the back side of it is partially covered or restricted in some way. After that, it has to be the outside edge, not the seal edge, that is leaking. Use some 600 grit to flat sand the bolting surfaces of the cap to ensure there isn't a burr or something. 600grit/wet/dry won't remove enough material to cause it from being too tight, it's a clamping surface, not a bearing surface.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Got to the seals on Sunday, exhaust cam seal dry and intake cam seal wet on outside edge that seals to cam cap. Not a bad leak just slow seepage. I'll try a little RTV wiped around the seal edge on the install. I'm doing a head swap so there is a big unknown with that.
 
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