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Has anybody replaced this on their 2.2 or 2.5? My front seal is leaking pretty good and I'm looking at Alldata and it shows a removeal tool and installer. Is it really necessary to have these tools or can somebody suggest an alternative method.
 

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Has anybody replaced this on their 2.2 or 2.5? My front seal is leaking pretty good and I'm looking at Alldata and it shows a removeal tool and installer. Is it really necessary to have these tools or can somebody suggest an alternative method.
It is not too hard to replace, especially if you have the timing belt off. After you remove the 18 mm sprocket to camshaft bolt (impact wrench recommended), you can gently tap the sprocket off. The seal will be visible and you can drill a tiny hole in the steel flange of the seal (try to get a dimple punched in the steel of the seal to prevent the drill bit from moving off center). Once you got the hole drilled, screw in a small sheet metal screw a few threads deep and use a vice grip or pliers to yank the seal out by pulling on that screw. A stuck seal may require more than 1 hole and more than 1 attempt.

I have changed these without removing the timing belt by setting the engine at TDC, zip tying the belt to the sprocket and while keeping the belt and sprocket under tension moving it away from the engine front and supporting the belt/sprocket from above with a bungy cord. It is a little tricky and you have to have a bungy cord with the S-hook wire end. The is a hole in the hood support channel that allows you to suspend the sprocket with belt attached. I had this method perfected a few years ago and could often replace a seal in under an hour without dealing with the timing belt removal. I have also installed repair sleeves the same way. If you replace the seal and find that it still leaks, you may need a repair sleeve.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It is not too hard to replace, especially if you have the timing belt off. After you remove the 18 mm sprocket to camshaft bolt (impact wrench recommended), you can gently tap the sprocket off. The seal will be visible and you can drill a tiny hole in the steel flange of the seal (try to get a dimple punched in the steel of the seal to prevent the drill bit from moving off center). Once you got the hole drilled, screw in a small sheet metal screw a few threads deep and use a vice grip or pliers to yank the seal out by pulling on that screw. A stuck seal may require more than 1 hole and more than 1 attempt.

I have changed these without removing the timing belt by setting the engine at TDC, zip tying the belt to the sprocket and while keeping the belt and sprocket under tension moving it away from the engine front and supporting the belt/sprocket from above with a bungy cord. It is a little tricky and you have to have a bungy cord with the S-hook wire end. The is a hole in the hood support channel that allows you to suspend the sprocket with belt attached. I had this method perfected a few years ago and could often replace a seal in under an hour without dealing with the timing belt removal. I have also installed repair sleeves the same way. If you replace the seal and find that it still leaks, you may need a repair sleeve.
So what do you install it with a socket or something? how hard is the front crankshaft seal? Napa sold me the wrong seal a while back, might as well do it if it isn't too much trouble.
 

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A large socket or something similar will work. I have the factory installing tool for mine but thats more out of convenience than anything.

The crankshaft seal is a little more involved, the timing belt has to come off and the sprocket is pressed on very tightly and if you dont use the right tool or make one to grab it properly it will fracture since its powdered metal.
 

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Nice tips from John Wood, thanks.
I'd like to get the correct seal. They state somewhere "front" or "rear", does that have something to do with dual cam (which is in this case irrelevant) or what? You know there is a seal in the timing end and a cam plug on the driver's side...
Due to shipping issues I'd like to get this one, could you check if this will fit to my ride, thanks:
Fel-Pro TCS45495
 

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Nice tips from John Wood, thanks.
I'd like to get the correct seal. They state somewhere "front" or "rear", does that have something to do with dual cam (which is in this case irrelevant) or what? You know there is a seal in the timing end and a cam plug on the driver's side...
Due to shipping issues I'd like to get this one, could you check if this will fit to my ride, thanks:
Fel-Pro TCS45495
I can't say if that will fit your car or not since I don't know the make/model or year (presumebly your 89). You want the engine front cam seal if that is what you are replacing. The rear seal was used on 2.2's with the rear driven smog pump on the older carb engines.. The 2.5's use a plug for the rear cam seal.
 

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Seal replaced succesfully without removing timing belt, using the "zip tying and bungy cord" -method. Took about half an hour. I used 2 mm drill and a single 3 mm screw with washer. Then I happen to have a large flat end screwdriver which I modified years ago to have a U-shaped groove, used that to the screw to swing out the old seal. New seal goes in without any special tools, just remember to clean and lubricate the surfaces.
With most of the jobs you face something unexpected or use more time than planned, this one was one of those rare "straight forward" cases... :)
 
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